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Irish Pub

NEWS
October 28, 1994 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delilah's Dolls, the Conchester Highway nightclub whose topless dancing spurred pickets, lawsuits and ultimately a court injunction, is about to be replaced by an Irish pub. Grogan's Pub could open as early as tonight, said operator Michael Grogan, 58, of Brookhaven. He said that he had signed a five-year lease for the property and that his Irish-style pub would include televised sporting events, a game room and weekly live music. "I'm not going to do anything like they did," Grogan said, alluding to the topless acts at Delilah's.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Top of the evening to you, lads and lasses. It's time to take a wee bit of a stroll along the Shore's Irish pub circuit. Interestingly, the two best Erin-go-bars are located just a Blarney stone's throw from each other. The oldest is McGuire's Erin Bar, South Tennessee Avenue and the Boardwalk, Atlantic City; 609-345-9607. The 85-year-old landmark, with its no-frills decor and friendly ambience, actually is more than just a bar. "This also is a social welfare center for European students," explained bartender/entertainer Mairti O'Sligeach, who hails from the Emerald Isle.
NEWS
August 6, 1993 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
Another fun weekend at the Shore is here, and the club scene is hotter than ever. But if you happen to feel like chilling a bit, the Downtown Bistro at the Irish Pub (St. James Place at the Boardwalk, Atlantic City; 609-344-9063) has some cool offerings. The adorable outdoor patio, where even the trash cans are cute, recently became the site of weekly karaoke nights, now Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9 to midnight. (No cover charge.) T-shirts and souvenir mugs are awarded to everyone willing to get up and make complete fools . . . er, sing their favorite tunes.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Brittingham's on Germantown Pike is more than just a seafood restaurant and Irish pub. It's a piece of history, in continuous use since 1743. Some swear that the place is haunted. Legend has it that the devil himself used to peer in the window whenever there was any card-playing going on. Then there are the stories about how the place was a watering hole for George Washington, the Marquis de Lafayette and their platoons of Continental soldiers during the Revolutionary War. Brittingham's, now observing its 250th birthday with events throughout the year, was called The Trooper at its birth.
SPORTS
March 18, 1993 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It's official: With 21 games remaining in this seemingly endless season, the 76ers have run out of excuses for losing. "I have nothing to say," guard Hersey Hawkins said after last night's ugly, 94-89 loss to the Washington Bullets, the Sixers' 18th loss in their last 21 outings. "I've said it all before. This game was nothing new or different. "We've had a million excuses for why we've lost games. If you guys (reporters) come up with a new one, let me know. " Hawkins then was told that coach Fred Carter said the Sixers lacked the "will to win. " "Have we used that one before?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The poster at the rear of the small, nearly empty room, a place that might be a down-at-the-heels Welsh country church or the cheap lodgings of an old trouper with a story to tell, reads "The Fantastic Francis Hardy, Faith Healer. One Night Only. " Just the facts. The room is the setting for the four monologues that make up the whole of Brian Friel's Faith Healer, which opened Wednesday and runs through Feb. 14 at the People's Light & Theatre Company. And the poster, with its flat, unadorned statement of Who and When, provides virtually the only information that will go unchallenged in this fascinating, enigmatic play.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | By Alissa Wolf, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Irish Pub, an Atlantic City landmark for 20 years, is more than just a bar. With its warm wood-and-brass decor, collection of antique memorabilia, selection of reasonably priced imported beers, hearty food, friendly service and overall good vibes, it's the next best thing to winging your way to the Emerald Isle. And it's more than deserving of its reputation as a beloved Shore institution. For years, the Pub avoided change, seemingly remaining frozen in time and space.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1992 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For those who feel that St. Patrick's Day is too grand a holiday to be limited to one day or even one weekend, once again the Erin Express will be getting a jump on the big celebration - observed officially on Tuesday, March 17 - by hitting the "Green Route" tomorrow and again next Saturday. The course of the Green Route takes celebrators to and from a number of saloons (Irish in fact or Irish in spirit) in West Philadelphia and Center City. Five buses will transport folks along the route between 2 and 6 p.m. Reservations are not required and the service is free.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | By Alissa Wolf, Special to The Inquirer
Granted, most towns have Gaelic-style watering holes. But, the offerings at the Shore are in a class by themselves. A MCGREAT CAFE. McGuire's Greater Pittsburgh Cafe is a no-nonsense, no- frills Irish bar. The pub doesn't have any special beers on tap. The decor isn't exactly elegant, to put it mildly. There's really not much food, except for a stray ham or cheese sandwich. And the crowd is pretty quiet. But the pub does offer a mean game of darts, a jukebox stocked with all your traditional Irish favorites, Irish folk singers three nights a week - Mickey Boyle, Peter McDonald and Martin Beck - and lots of Irish patrons.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Miller was in the Irish Pub less than 30 minutes when his car was broken into and a canvas bag containing his valuable law school books and class notes was stolen. Parked - illegally, he admits - under a street lamp at busy 12th and Walnut Streets, he figured he was more likely to get a ticket than get ripped off. But what surprised him more than the theft was that his books and notes were recovered with the help of 22 people - make that 22 strangers - who came to his rescue.
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