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Irish Whiskey

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
WELCOME to Cheap Buzz, where we eavesdrop as sommelier Marnie Old attempts to teach the joys of wine and fine spirits to Buzz, a guy with no sophistication and not much money. Here's their latest conversation: Buzz: So Marnie, Saturday is St. Patrick's Day. Are you a green-beer gal? I bet you'd look great with a green tongue. Marnie: Very funny, Buzz. I prefer Irish whiskey. It's getting more popular every year, and not just in March. People are discovering it's a milder, softer style of whiskey than scotch or bourbon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
IRISH WHISKEY is perhaps the smoothest, most approachable whiskey in the liquor store, and it offers great values. Five of my eight recommendations cost less than $50. Although there are some outstanding Irish single malts, such as Connemara and Bushmills 16-year, they're a little pricey. I generally enjoyed the blends just as much as the single malts, and they were significantly more affordable. In the name of value, I veered toward blends rather than single malts, though I do include one "pure pot still," Redbreast, which is a unique "single" made from a mix of malted and unmalted barley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
INSIDE the booze industry, there's a lot of talk about "recruiting" newbie drinkers to try more complex spirits. What these insiders mean is that they're hoping to grab young drinkers whose juvenile palates now gravitate toward, say, whipped-cream vodka, and persuade them to try the stuff people euphemistically say is "an acquired taste. " Certain drinking "holidays" now take the form of informal Booze Recruitment Drives. Think of all the tequila talk around Cinco de Mayo, for instance.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey Marnie, I need to stock up on Irish whiskey for St. Patrick's Day. Which brand is authentic? Marnie: They all are, Buzz. If it's labeled "Irish whiskey," it must be made in Ireland. Buzz : An Irish buddy told me not to be caught dead drinking the wrong one. I sure don't want to offend anyone. But I forget which is which. Marnie: Oh, I see. For decades, two Irish whiskey brands dominated from opposite ends of Ireland. Irish-Americans often signaled their political allegiances in the conflict over Northern Ireland by their brand of choice.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Smooth Irish whiskey is rolling in Pennsylvania, where sales of the most popular brand, Jameson, grew by 20 percent last year. But with a discount and free shipping on the PLCB website in March, this is the month to explore some of the Emerald Isle's finest spirits. Here's a pair that's worth your while. Scotch lovers will be interested in the peat-smoked single-malt from Connemara - atypical in a country whose whiskeys are normally not smoked. It's still distinctly Irish at its honeyed heart, though, with a drier, less medicinal smoke than the sea-tinged malts of Islay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009
Somehow, I'm not surprised when Tir na Nog manager Elaine Moffitt takes a whiff of Tyrconnell and declares: "Oh, I don't like the smell of that!" After all, the Mayo-born Moffitt is a Jameson-and-water gal, a devotee of the soft, vanillin charms that epitomize the classic big brands of Irish whiskey. And there's nothing wrong with that. But Tyrconnell is anything but typical - in fact, it's an Irish whiskey a Scotch drinker could like. To be sure, it's not quite peaty like Connemara (a gem TnN also occasionally stocks, at $7 a shot)
FOOD
March 15, 1995 | By Margaret M. Johnson, FOR THE INQUIRER
"Cream - rich as an Irish brogue. Coffee - strong as a friendly hand. Sugar - sweet as the tongue of a rogue. Whiskey - smooth as the wit of the land. " A bit of Irish eloquence, perhaps, but when chef Joe Sheridan first blended cream, hot coffee and whiskey to warm the cold and weary passengers who arrived from the United States on the Flying Boats at Foynes, in County Limerick, he struck on a recipe that would forever change the drinking habits of the world. The year was 1943.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
D ONAL McCOY, 47, of Southwark, has owned the Old City restaurant Serrano and the music venue upstairs, Tin Angel, since 2005. The native of Belfast, Northern Ireland, a former bartender, curates the liquor collection for both businesses. He also co-owns, with Neil Laughlin, the nearby bar Sassafras. Q: Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom. Do you feel Irish? A: Northern Ireland is part of the island of Ireland. I can speak the Irish language and was educated by Christian Brothers, so, yes, I'm very Irish.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Inspired by "Taming of the Stripes," a new Norma Bessieres exhibit in the lobby, Executive Chef Jim Coleman of Sofitel's Liberté Lounge (120 S. 17th St., 215-569-8300, libertelounge.com) has created an African-themed menu with a French spin. Try Ghana Soup Shooters, Uganda Veal with Bananas and Ginger, or Nigerian Pancakes with Smoked Shrimp, among other dishes. Green beer?! Gag. We celebrate St. Patrick's season right - with Irish whiskey and in our own time. McCrossen's Tavern gets that and is avoiding the Sunday hordes with a Totally Awesome Irish Whiskey Dinner starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here are the answers to our St. Patrick's Day true-false quiz. 1. TRUE. St. Patrick, perhaps born in Wales or Scotland, was taken to Ireland as a slave. 2. FALSE. St. Patrick was born Maewyn Succat. 3. TRUE. March 17 is the day St. Patrick supposedly died. 4. TRUE. Other big islands with no native snakes include Iceland, New Zealand and Greenland. 5. FALSE. New York City is where Irish soldiers held the first St. Patrick's Day parade in 1762. 6. TRUE. kissing the Blarney Stone is supposed to make one more eloquent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloody delicious  The most complicated thing on the menu at Brick & Mortar may be the Bloody Mary, made from general manager Len Wood's own personal recipe. The 22 secret ingredients include 15 spices, including ginger and turmeric, three hot sauces, soy sauce, horseradish, and fresh juice from celery, roasted red peppers, lemons and limes. It's available by the bottle at the restaurant, and will keep for three weeks or longer, according to Wood, who advises mixing it with Irish whiskey.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
D ONAL McCOY, 47, of Southwark, has owned the Old City restaurant Serrano and the music venue upstairs, Tin Angel, since 2005. The native of Belfast, Northern Ireland, a former bartender, curates the liquor collection for both businesses. He also co-owns, with Neil Laughlin, the nearby bar Sassafras. Q: Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom. Do you feel Irish? A: Northern Ireland is part of the island of Ireland. I can speak the Irish language and was educated by Christian Brothers, so, yes, I'm very Irish.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey Marnie, I need to stock up on Irish whiskey for St. Patrick's Day. Which brand is authentic? Marnie: They all are, Buzz. If it's labeled "Irish whiskey," it must be made in Ireland. Buzz : An Irish buddy told me not to be caught dead drinking the wrong one. I sure don't want to offend anyone. But I forget which is which. Marnie: Oh, I see. For decades, two Irish whiskey brands dominated from opposite ends of Ireland. Irish-Americans often signaled their political allegiances in the conflict over Northern Ireland by their brand of choice.
SPORTS
March 18, 2013 | By Drew McQuade, mcquadd@phillynews.com
Real Irishmen never drink green beer unless it's the only foam on tap. So grab a Guinness or an O'Doul's, and toast St. Paddy's Day with us in the first, possibly annual, definitely incomplete, Irish Athletes with Philly Ties List. (Add your own Hall of Famers to our All-Irish team at philly.com/IrishAthletes.) Cornelius McGillicuddy Sr. Better known as Connie Mack, he was born in East Brookfield, Mass., three days before Christmas in 1862 to Irish immigrants, Michael McGillicuddy and Mary McKillop.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
Inspired by "Taming of the Stripes," a new Norma Bessieres exhibit in the lobby, Executive Chef Jim Coleman of Sofitel's Liberté Lounge (120 S. 17th St., 215-569-8300, libertelounge.com) has created an African-themed menu with a French spin. Try Ghana Soup Shooters, Uganda Veal with Bananas and Ginger, or Nigerian Pancakes with Smoked Shrimp, among other dishes. Green beer?! Gag. We celebrate St. Patrick's season right - with Irish whiskey and in our own time. McCrossen's Tavern gets that and is avoiding the Sunday hordes with a Totally Awesome Irish Whiskey Dinner starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Smooth Irish whiskey is rolling in Pennsylvania, where sales of the most popular brand, Jameson, grew by 20 percent last year. But with a discount and free shipping on the PLCB website in March, this is the month to explore some of the Emerald Isle's finest spirits. Here's a pair that's worth your while. Scotch lovers will be interested in the peat-smoked single-malt from Connemara - atypical in a country whose whiskeys are normally not smoked. It's still distinctly Irish at its honeyed heart, though, with a drier, less medicinal smoke than the sea-tinged malts of Islay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
WELCOME to Cheap Buzz, where we eavesdrop as sommelier Marnie Old attempts to teach the joys of wine and fine spirits to Buzz, a guy with no sophistication and not much money. Here's their latest conversation: Buzz: So Marnie, Saturday is St. Patrick's Day. Are you a green-beer gal? I bet you'd look great with a green tongue. Marnie: Very funny, Buzz. I prefer Irish whiskey. It's getting more popular every year, and not just in March. People are discovering it's a milder, softer style of whiskey than scotch or bourbon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
IRISH WHISKEY is perhaps the smoothest, most approachable whiskey in the liquor store, and it offers great values. Five of my eight recommendations cost less than $50. Although there are some outstanding Irish single malts, such as Connemara and Bushmills 16-year, they're a little pricey. I generally enjoyed the blends just as much as the single malts, and they were significantly more affordable. In the name of value, I veered toward blends rather than single malts, though I do include one "pure pot still," Redbreast, which is a unique "single" made from a mix of malted and unmalted barley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2012
INSIDE the booze industry, there's a lot of talk about "recruiting" newbie drinkers to try more complex spirits. What these insiders mean is that they're hoping to grab young drinkers whose juvenile palates now gravitate toward, say, whipped-cream vodka, and persuade them to try the stuff people euphemistically say is "an acquired taste. " Certain drinking "holidays" now take the form of informal Booze Recruitment Drives. Think of all the tequila talk around Cinco de Mayo, for instance.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here are the answers to our St. Patrick's Day true-false quiz. 1. TRUE. St. Patrick, perhaps born in Wales or Scotland, was taken to Ireland as a slave. 2. FALSE. St. Patrick was born Maewyn Succat. 3. TRUE. March 17 is the day St. Patrick supposedly died. 4. TRUE. Other big islands with no native snakes include Iceland, New Zealand and Greenland. 5. FALSE. New York City is where Irish soldiers held the first St. Patrick's Day parade in 1762. 6. TRUE. kissing the Blarney Stone is supposed to make one more eloquent.
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