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Irishman

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"I'll spare you the sordid details," says the young Irishman, quaffing a pint and lighting a cigarette. He thinks for a moment, then adds: "My life is one long sordid detail. " By the end of the story he proceeds to tell, it's hard to argue. The story is an hour-by-hour account of a three-day bender, a modern-day Ulysses measured out in glasses of lager and whiskey. The subject is the Irishman himself. He is 26, with a wife and two small girls. He lives in a depressing housing complex and works at a depressing job in some sort of government office.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
When Jim Holland arrived in Philadelphia from Ireland in 1949, he had a wife to support and needed a job. But many potential employers made it clear they didn't want to hire him.   "No Irish Need Apply" signs often greeted him. But Jim was not one to be put off by that largely forgotten prejudice. He persisted and landed a job with a construction company. He then had one other obstacle to overcome: his wife. When the former Anna Duggan realized that her husband's job took him high up into tall buildings, she was horrified.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Not 15 minutes into Kill the Irishman and Cleveland dockworker Danny Greene has already slapped two guys silly and punched another out cold. Tough? You bet. If Brando's Terry Malloy could've been a contender, Ray Stevenson's Greene - a real-life stevedore turned union boss turned mob-connected Cleveland folk hero - definitely was one. But comparisons to On the Waterfront can stop right there. Kill the Irishman , from director Jonathan Hensleigh ( The Punisher )
SPORTS
July 23, 2007 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, as the gloaming settled over the coast of the North Sea last night, Padraig Harrington became the first Irishman in 60 years to hoist the Claret Jug. But it was not a tidy finish to the 136th British Open. There was Sergio Garcia, the leader through three rounds, squandering a 3-shot lead. There was all manner of comers and near-misses. There was Harrington suffering a double-bogey at the 18th in regulation that was so calamitous it conjured images of Jean Van de Velde in 1999.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The nicest gift that anyone could give the Philadelphia Theater Company in this holiday season is the benefit of the doubt. In the spirit of goodwill to all, we can go along with the company's belief that there is a play hidden in The Voice of the Prairie, as long as we don't have to say either that we enjoyed it or even that we understood it. There is always the possibility that someone will do both. The production, which opened last night at the Plays and Players Theater, was seen for review at the Tuesday evening performance.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Wilson Goode, an Irishman for the day, and Thomas J. Gibson, a lifelong Irishman, will lead the way at tomorrow's St. Patrick's Day Parade along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. More than 17,000 marchers and 60 organizations are expected to parade in this annual tribute to the patron saint of Erin. The parade is sponsored by the St. Patrick's Day Observance Association. The parade will begin at 1:30 p.m. at 20th Street and the Parkway and move east toward Independence Hall via 17th Street and Chestnut Street.
NEWS
December 2, 1999
This just in: Police Commissioner John Timoney is Irish. To some, apparently, that means he talks funny and drinks. Timoney does indeed talk funny, if a brogue sounds funny to you, but as far as we've heard, there's nothing extraordinary about his drinking habits. Ethnic prejudice being what it is, however, he was called a "drunken Irish carpetbagger" by (are you ready for this?) someone named McNeill. Which just goes to show you how insidious bigotry can be, when even "your own" accept the defamatory stereotypes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Sean Patrick Finnegan is dead before his time, or maybe just at the right time - the day his wedding to the comely Katherine O'Shea was scheduled to take place. But before he goes into the ground, he will have to endure a slew of just-short-of-censored Irish one-liners and as many ethnic stereotypes as the dozen-member cast of "Finnegan's Wake" can purvey. Atlantic City casinos have been trying all permutations of entertainment of late to attract varied clientele. Over the last year, the Showboat has been the most transformative.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Bing Mark FOR THE INQUIRER
What does the brain want? Chaos or order? Stimulus or calm? Pig Iron Theatre Company's luminously beautiful Shut Eye responds to these questions in both its subject and structure. Conceived and directed by Pig Iron's Dan Rothenberg and the renowned theater director Joseph Chaikin, Shut Eye lays out a handful of interwoven situations where a central character has troubled sleep. It begins with Judy, who sleeps fitfully in a hospital chair, tending to her brother, Matthew, who lies in a coma after a car accident.
NEWS
December 1, 1999 | by Mark McDonald , Daily News Staff Writer
A Fraternal Order of Police lawyer reportedly called Police Commissioner John F. Timoney a "drunken Irish carpetbagger" and mocked his accent during an arbitration hearing. Timoney, a native of Ireland who had a brilliant career as a New York City cop before coming here in the spring of 1998, last week fired off an angry letter to FOP President Richard Costello, protesting the slur. "I cannot overstate the humiliation and disappointment caused to me by these remarks," Timoney wrote of the comment allegedly made by FOP attorney Richard C. McNeill Jr. "He [McNeill]
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NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE Irish Memorial was dedicated on Penn's Landing in 2003, Jack O'Connell, a member of the board that commissioned the sculpture, happily pointed out convincing evidence of how the Irish have prospered in America since the deadly famine of the 1800s. "All the committee members are overweight," joked O'Connell, himself a big man. In contrast, the 35 figures on the 30-foot-long monument show in their faces the ravages of a famine that killed millions when the Irish potato crop failed between 1845 and 1850, causing a massive migration to America.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph P. Lamb Sr., 94, of Drexel Hill, a proud Irishman who never forgot his Philadelphia roots, died Friday, Sept. 26, of respiratory failure at Springfield Hospital in Delaware County. Born and raised in Southwest Philadelphia, Mr. Lamb was a 1937 graduate of West Philadelphia Catholic High School for Boys. While there, he played football, baseball, and basketball for the Connell Spades. He was a resident of Briarcliffe, a neighborhood of brick rowhouses in Glenolden, before moving to Drexel Hill in 1969.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ireland - British prosecutors have charged a 61-year-old Irishman with the 1982 IRA attack on the queen's cavalry in Hyde Park, a nail-bombing at a London tourist attraction that left four soldiers and seven horses dead. Wednesday's surprise arraignment of John Downey in a London court came on the 15th anniversary of the ratification of the Good Friday peace accord for Northern Ireland, which sought to end three decades of bloodshed over the disputed British territory. British authorities declined to explain why they arrested Downey as he arrived Sunday at London's Gatwick Airport nearly 31 years after the attack.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the usual for the tightly knit Irish and Irish- American community in the area - tragedy strikes, the phones ring, and fund-raising begins. This time, it was for Charlie Dunlop of Havertown. The 46-year-old electrician, who had emigrated from Northern Ireland, dropped dead in his kitchen. His wife and young son walked in to find Dunlop sprawled on the floor. For many in the Irish community and beyond, Charlie Dunlop's death more than a year ago felt like a direct hit. The cliche seemed to fit - everybody knew Charlie.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
When Jim Holland arrived in Philadelphia from Ireland in 1949, he had a wife to support and needed a job. But many potential employers made it clear they didn't want to hire him.   "No Irish Need Apply" signs often greeted him. But Jim was not one to be put off by that largely forgotten prejudice. He persisted and landed a job with a construction company. He then had one other obstacle to overcome: his wife. When the former Anna Duggan realized that her husband's job took him high up into tall buildings, she was horrified.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Not 15 minutes into Kill the Irishman and Cleveland dockworker Danny Greene has already slapped two guys silly and punched another out cold. Tough? You bet. If Brando's Terry Malloy could've been a contender, Ray Stevenson's Greene - a real-life stevedore turned union boss turned mob-connected Cleveland folk hero - definitely was one. But comparisons to On the Waterfront can stop right there. Kill the Irishman , from director Jonathan Hensleigh ( The Punisher )
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com215-854-5992
In an era when even low-budget movies have slick digital presentation, the infectiously crude "Kill the Irishman" is a tonic of knocked-out teeth. The movie looks like it was made by two guys, one holding a 16 mm camera, another chasing the actors with a boom mike (to capture dialogue that wavers indiscriminately between good and bad). I felt like a kid at the drive-in watching Joe Don Baker bash guys with a board in "Walking Tall," except that "Irishman" is a strictly urban affair - based on the actual exploits of a guy named Danny Green, who instigated a mob war in Cleveland in the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Sean Patrick Finnegan is dead before his time, or maybe just at the right time - the day his wedding to the comely Katherine O'Shea was scheduled to take place. But before he goes into the ground, he will have to endure a slew of just-short-of-censored Irish one-liners and as many ethnic stereotypes as the dozen-member cast of "Finnegan's Wake" can purvey. Atlantic City casinos have been trying all permutations of entertainment of late to attract varied clientele. Over the last year, the Showboat has been the most transformative.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By ELLEN GRAY Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
The historic streets of Philadelphia may have been passed up for Virginia reproductions in the HBO miniseries "John Adams," but at least we can claim George Washington. David Morse, the versatile Philadelphia-based actor who spent two seasons driving a cab here in "Hack" shows up in a white wig and a nose and accent not his own in the second of two episodes premiering Sunday. Just know that he fought for the nose. "I had to convince them," he said last month during an interview in HBO's New York offices.
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