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Iron Curtain

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NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
The wall has fallen. The kids are wearing Levis and Nikes. The Eastern bloc is thirsty for anything American - and rock and roll is the drink of choice. "Nick said he could book us in Russia, but I really didn't believe him," said Chris Kish, lead vocalist and guitarist of the West Chester rock band VHF. "Like everything else in this business, you just say, 'Yeah, right, go ahead.' I didn't think he was serious. " VHF manager Nick Norris booked the dance-rock trio for eight summer nights behind the tattered Iron Curtain - two in Moscow, two in Leningrad, two at summer resorts along the Black Sea and two in Romania.
NEWS
June 25, 1989
Romania, whose government seems to have lost all concept of civilized behavior, is building a barbed wire fence on its border with Hungary. A Dutch diplomat called it "a new iron curtain in the heart of Europe. " The purpose of the fence is to prevent the escape of tens of thousands ethnic Hungarians whose villages the demented Romanian leader Nicolae Ceaucescu is destroying in his effort to repress their culture. But this ugly barrier symbolizes the end of the old Iron Curtain.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | By John P. Rossi
The shadow of the Cold War - the defining geopolitical event of the last half of the 20th century that divided the world into "East" and "West" - vanished with the fall of communism in the Soviet Union in 1991. When the Cold War started among erstwhile allies in the fight against fascism is still debated. But America's first realization that a dark cloud was settling over the West's relations with the Soviet Union took place a half-century ago tomorrow when Britain's wartime prime minister, Winston Churchill, evoked another famous image to characterize the political shifts going on. In a speech at Fulton, Mo., he spoke of an "Iron Curtain" descending in Eastern Europe, bifurcating the continent among those free and those not free.
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
A couple of American entrepreneurs have already started marketing pieces of the Berlin Wall, but so far nobody has figured out how to make a buck out of the Iron Curtain. "A slice of the Iron Curtain might be just the thing for one of those suburban activity rooms," I told my wife. "You could use it to screen off the wet bar. " "The Iron Curtain is not really an iron curtain," my wife said. "Well, the wet bar's not really wet, either," I said. "And there's not actually much activity in activity rooms these days.
NEWS
October 2, 1986
Thank you for the Sept. 21 Review & Opinion article by Frank Greve regarding the relationship between the CIA and reporters. As he says, no evidence has been "offered" that Nicholas Daniloff spied for the CIA. (It would be surprising if such an "offer" were made by anyone on this side of the Iron Curtain.) Persons who should know scoff at the idea that he spied for the CIA. Yet as Mr. Greve shows, there have always been strong ties between reporters and the CIA. Since the CIA and its administrators and agents are, supposedly, masters of the art of deception, one must suspect their version.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
George Bush, vowing to "continue to campaign as an underdog," glided in stately, almost presidential style across Missouri yesterday and predicted that the end of the Cold War was in sight. Looking beyond the Nov. 8 election to a Bush presidency, the Republican nominee offered a vision of a more peaceful world relatively free of East-West tensions and the burden of the arms race. "My generation has lived in the shadows of war - World War and Cold War," Bush said in a speech to students at Westminster College, the site of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill's famous "Iron Curtain" speech in 1946.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Saying that "the Iron Curtain has begun to part," President Bush yesterday took two new steps to help bring East and West closer by speeding up efforts to cut conventional armed forces in Europe and by rewarding Hungary's shift toward a free-market economy with a package of limited U.S. aid. The moves were announced as Bush wrapped up a four-day trip to Eastern Europe that combined symbolism and diplomacy to demonstrate that the gap between...
NEWS
December 21, 1989
The one place that seems to be crying out for a superpower to invade is Romania. The horror stories about the weekend massacre of protesters in the city of Timisoara are sickening. The casualties may number in the thousands, worse than Tiananmen Square. Such news is being gathered second-hand because Romania's unhinged dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, has sealed his borders - the last remnant of the iron curtain - to outsiders. But reports by phone and from departing travelers speak of mass shootings, bayonetings, and bodies dumped into mass graves and rivers.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I work in a professional office where nearly all my co-workers are married and live rather uneventful lifestyles. I was divorced a few years ago and have not remarried. I have dated a lot of women, and it has become an issue with my co-workers. They insist on hearing about the dates I go on and ask for the details of what took place, and I usually oblige them. Lately, there has been more and more gossip about my so-called "wild lifestyle," and I have become the talk of the office.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By EDWIN YODER
Mikhail Gorbachev's speech at Fulton, Mo., was a fascinating exercise in punctuation - a sort of ritual end of the Cold War. And on one score the former president of the former Soviet Union is absolutely right. Its end is a "victory" for no one and for everyone. In other respects, Gorby's speech suggests that the Russians, and not they alone, are still struggling to get their history straight. He was speaking at Westminster College, where Sir Winston Churchill in March 1946 observed, to the dismay of many a pacifist heart, that an "Iron Curtain" had descended across Europe, isolating the "ancient capitals of Central and Eastern Europe" from the benefits of recovery and freedom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The wind blows cold and hard in the East German backwater, where the title character of Barbara , a Berlin doctor in exile, finds herself. Watched over by the secret police, by nosy neighbors, by the staff at the bare-bones hospital she has been reassigned to, Barbara (an amazingly composed Nina Hoss) smokes her cigarettes and sees her patients and bicycles back and forth from her drab apartment to work. And quietly, she plots her escape. Christian Petzold's masterfully hushed, suspenseful thriller percolates with dread.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I work in a professional office where nearly all my co-workers are married and live rather uneventful lifestyles. I was divorced a few years ago and have not remarried. I have dated a lot of women, and it has become an issue with my co-workers. They insist on hearing about the dates I go on and ask for the details of what took place, and I usually oblige them. Lately, there has been more and more gossip about my so-called "wild lifestyle," and I have become the talk of the office.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By John P. Rossi
Margaret Thatcher was the most remarkable female political figure of the 20th century. The longest-serving prime minister in a century, the Iron Lady - as the Soviets named her for her opposition to the Iron Curtain - Thatcher left an indelible mark on British and world politics. A new film about Thatcher, however, is unfortunately typical of modern filmmaking. Despite having a great true story to tell, its writer and director preferred instead to contrive a fanciful tale that is politically and culturally correct.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2005 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Bricklin, who introduced America to the Subaru and the Yugo, with different results, has a new project: importing cars from China. If all goes as planned, the first Chinese cars ever exported to the United States would arrive in 2007, brought here by Bricklin's Visionary Vehicles L.L.C., of New York, and manufactured by Chery Automobile Co., of Wuhu, China. Bricklin, who was born in Philadelphia and prides himself on thinking big, expects to sell 250,000 vehicles the first year.
NEWS
March 4, 1996 | By John P. Rossi
The shadow of the Cold War - the defining geopolitical event of the last half of the 20th century that divided the world into "East" and "West" - vanished with the fall of communism in the Soviet Union in 1991. When the Cold War started among erstwhile allies in the fight against fascism is still debated. But America's first realization that a dark cloud was settling over the West's relations with the Soviet Union took place a half-century ago tomorrow when Britain's wartime prime minister, Winston Churchill, evoked another famous image to characterize the political shifts going on. In a speech at Fulton, Mo., he spoke of an "Iron Curtain" descending in Eastern Europe, bifurcating the continent among those free and those not free.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Traditionally in movies, lovers separated by the tide of great events do their tear-filled parting while a war is going on. The farewell in Margarethe von Trotta's The Promise takes place while a wall is going up. As the defining and infamous symbol of the hatreds of the Cold War, the Berlin Wall has been slow to attract the interest of filmmakers since it finally came tumbling down in 1989. The Promise is too ambitious in its scope to fully live up to its promise, but von Trotta has made a fascinating and provocative portrait of an arbitrarily divided city.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | By RICHARD REEVES
The last time I saw Berlin, less than a year ago, it was pleasantly boring. The wall and the tension were down, the feeling that perhaps tomorrow we die was gone, and the "capital" of a unified Germany was coming back down to earth after more than 40 years as a "flashpoint" or "tinderbox," the place where World War III would begin. So President Clinton was in the wrong place at the wrong time last week to get what he wanted (and needs): a flashy rhetorical foreign-policy triumph that might have reminded Americans of the dangerous excitement when President Kennedy looked over the wall between West Berlin and East Berlin in 1963, or even the lesser moment in 1987 when President Reagan shouted that Soviet Premier Gorbachev should tear down the wall.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | By LEON SULLIVAN
The lack of human rights is the greatest problem in the world today and any efforts to promote justice and equality must be encouraged. These men (Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk who received the Philadelphia Liberty Medals July 4) and those who work with them are trying against the greatest odds to advance human freedoms and liberty in an environment where many have said it is impossible to do so. They are faced with the awesome challenge of changing South Africa. These men, and those who work with them, must create a new country.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By EDWIN YODER
Mikhail Gorbachev's speech at Fulton, Mo., was a fascinating exercise in punctuation - a sort of ritual end of the Cold War. And on one score the former president of the former Soviet Union is absolutely right. Its end is a "victory" for no one and for everyone. In other respects, Gorby's speech suggests that the Russians, and not they alone, are still struggling to get their history straight. He was speaking at Westminster College, where Sir Winston Churchill in March 1946 observed, to the dismay of many a pacifist heart, that an "Iron Curtain" had descended across Europe, isolating the "ancient capitals of Central and Eastern Europe" from the benefits of recovery and freedom.
NEWS
May 8, 1992
In Missouri's heartland, from the podium where Winston Churchill gave his galvanizing "Iron Curtain" speech in 1946, Mikhail Gorbachev reminded America this week that history hasn't ended with the Cold War's demise. Indeed, he said, new tensions are rising, fed by an untenable disparity between rich and poor nations: Conflict looms now not between East and West, but North and South. It is a speech that George Bush should have given. It is the challenge confronting the United Nations' Earth Summit conference in Rio, the challege of the 1990s.
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