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IN THE NEWS

Iron Man

SPORTS
July 30, 1999 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
He has now played 101 games. Rico Brogna has played more games than any other Phillie this season. More than grit-and-guts Scott Rolen, more than steady-as-she-goes Doug Glanville, more than even Bobby Abreu. One hundred one games. Forced to sign one-year contracts because of a spinal arthritic condition known as ankylosing spondylitis, Brogna was out there again yesterday, under sunny skies, in soupy conditions, diving and twisting and running on a surface just slightly more giving than your driveway.
NEWS
April 30, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Tony Stark, a most dissolute and disarming arms manufacturer, builds flamethrowers in the basement. For kicks. The bucks aren't bad, either. Sporting wit (and goatee) sharp as a survival knife, Robert Downey Jr. is the billionaire bon vivant in Iron Man , the fast, funny and deliriously entertaining flick based on Marvel Comics' self-made superhero. Unlike genetic and environmental supers, this weapons whiz gives himself superpowers. A hard-drinking inventor/playboy/businessman, Tony is a hybrid of Howard Hughes and Hugh Hefner, 1950s fantasy figures gene-spliced for 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
MICKEY ROURKE brings a Russian accent and electrified whip to "Iron Man 2," a franchise that gets goofier as it goes along. Director Jon Favreau isn't much for special effects, but he likes eccentric performances and gets them from Rourke, Robert Downey Jr. and Sam Rockwell. The story? Who remembers, but the cast has a lot of fun, and so did audiences. The DVD has few perks - most of the featurettes are packed into the Blu-ray edition. You get more extras on the DVD for "Get Him to the Greek," a rollicking spinoff of "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" featuring Jonah Hill as a worshipful PR guy shepherding a drug-crazed musician (Russell Brand)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IT WAS a big weekend for two indestructible superheroes. Despite lesser reviews than its predecessor, "Iron Man 2," starring Robert Downey Jr. as Marvel's gadget-happy billionaire with real abs of steel, earned $133.6 million domestically on its opening weekend, according to Paramount Pictures' estimates. The opening rocketed past the 2008 original's $98.6 million debut and became the fifth-biggest movie-opening weekend of all time. Having taken in $194 million overseas since it began playing in many international markets last week, IM2's worldwide now exceeds $327 million.
SPORTS
April 26, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Baltimore's iron man will be allowed to rust a little this season, Orioles manager Mike Hargrove has decided. Third baseman Cal Ripken, who set the major league record for consecutive games played, will play between "two to five times a week," to give more time to backup Mike Kinkade. Ripken started last night at Detroit and hit a three-run home run, his first homer of the season, in Baltimore's 6-4 victory. Ripken's three-run homer came in a five-run fifth inning off knuckleballer Steve Sparks.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Lindstrom won his second straight club championship Saturday at Riverton Country Club, defeating Ross Hagstoz, 7 and 6, in the scheduled 36- hole finals match. Lindstrom gives his occupation as steelworker but will admit that he actually doesn't climb the high iron anymore; he's a superintendent for the family steel erection business in Cinnaminson. A one-handicapper who's been playing 10 years, Lindstrom was 2 up at the turn after shooting in the neighborhood of 76, which is 5-over.
SPORTS
April 23, 1997 | By Bill Iezzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George School coach Scott Spence calls him the Iron Man. Teammates embrace him as their iron man and most artful dodger. However he is described, junior Adam Decker, the top point scorer on the boys' lacrosse team, is the spark that fires up the Cougars during the entire 40 minutes of play. Decker wasn't always as resilient as he is now, so he had to rely on his wits to get the ball past the goalkeeper. As a 5-foot-8, 145-pound freshman, the Solebury Township resident played varsity crease attack, a position in which a player takes a pounding around the net. Sneakiness enabled him to score 27 goals that year, he said, because he had learned how to view the net before catching the ball and flinging it past the goalie as he was about to be hit. As a 5-10, 155-pound sophomore, Decker played attack and a little midfield, where he shed his sneaky shoes for those of a dancer, dodging defenders on his way to the net. He soon learned that as a midfielder he had to do a lot of running in order to play defense and offense, and that was where his soccer skills came in handy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
As Iron Man - and his alter-ego, Tony Stark - get set to wow the masses at cineplexes this weekend, it is worth noting that the hero is approaching nearly five decades of thrilling comic book readers. So what has allowed the character to not only stand out but thrive while being published almost nonstop since 1962? "The basic elements of classic tragedy are in his story - a guy who has it all, loses it and regains it," said Danny Fingeroth, author of "Disguised as Clark Kent: Jews, Comics and the Creation of the Superhero.
SPORTS
June 2, 2002 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Call it a midlife crisis at 200 m.p.h. Ricky Rudd had paid no mind to the gray hair, the crow's feet, and the minor aches in his joints. Still, when he turned 45 in September, Rudd looked in the mirror and suddenly confronted his own mortality. "I think in the back of my mind I had set a goal for myself, that before I turn 50, I won't be in the race car anymore," he said. "I've got a young boy at home, 7-year-old Landon, that would like to have his dad go watch him play his baseball games and stuff.
SPORTS
July 11, 1993 | By Dave Caldwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cal Ripken Jr. is not a very big fan of Cal Ripken Jr. these days. Ask him how he feels about starting his 10th All-Star Game, before 46,000 adoring home-town fans who have made him a civic treasure, and the owner of a .216 batting average will stand silently at his locker in a corner of the Baltimore Orioles' clubhouse, frown, then pick out words not usually associated with Cal Ripken. Words such as embarrassed. Lucky. Backed in. "Personally," he said softly, "I'd feel a lot better about myself if I would have been playing better than I have been.
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