CollectionsIron Men
IN THE NEWS

Iron Men

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rules of the gospel road were unforgiving. No outside women could ride in the Dixie Hummingbirds' car. "If there was a woman," says James Davis, "she'd better be your wife. " Come in five minutes late for rehearsal, best bring your $5. And forget whiskey, because the 'Birds sang in pulpits. Image was so important that no member could be seen playing anything on the jukebox other than the Lord's music. It was Davis, the vocal quartet's founder and steadying hand, who wound up paying the only fine for a jukebox transgression.
NEWS
June 10, 1986 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
Ask an ironworker in the skeleton of a skyscraper how to dress for success and he'll say dress to survive. It's a combination of macho and careful planning, from the top of those colorful plastic hardhats with the Ironworkers Local 401 decal to the steel- reinforced toes of the $80 work boots. "Steel's sharp up there," said foreman Charles Roberts during a recent lunch break from One Liberty Place, under construction at 17th and Market streets. "Everything up there's hard on your clothes, hard on your body, hard on your shoes.
SPORTS
February 3, 1995 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 76ers' annoying medical woes arose again yesterday, the morning after their first victory in six games, and this time the subject didn't include rickety center Shawn Bradley. Rather, point guard B.J. Tyler strained a stomach muscle at practice, prompting coach John Lucas to consider getting another player. Lucas said that shooting guard Jeff Malone, who has been out for almost two months, was going to seek a new opinion on his aching right heel later yesterday. If Tyler is unable to play next week, Lucas cannot make do without both players.
SPORTS
April 23, 1997 | By Bill Iezzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George School coach Scott Spence calls him the Iron Man. Teammates embrace him as their iron man and most artful dodger. However he is described, junior Adam Decker, the top point scorer on the boys' lacrosse team, is the spark that fires up the Cougars during the entire 40 minutes of play. Decker wasn't always as resilient as he is now, so he had to rely on his wits to get the ball past the goalkeeper. As a 5-foot-8, 145-pound freshman, the Solebury Township resident played varsity crease attack, a position in which a player takes a pounding around the net. Sneakiness enabled him to score 27 goals that year, he said, because he had learned how to view the net before catching the ball and flinging it past the goalie as he was about to be hit. As a 5-10, 155-pound sophomore, Decker played attack and a little midfield, where he shed his sneaky shoes for those of a dancer, dodging defenders on his way to the net. He soon learned that as a midfielder he had to do a lot of running in order to play defense and offense, and that was where his soccer skills came in handy.
SPORTS
January 28, 2004 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coach Ken Hitchcock called it a "best-case scenario. " Flyers right winger Tony Amonte could miss 10 to 14 days with a partial tear of the medial collateral ligament in his right knee. An MRI late Monday confirmed the tear. Amonte was plowed into by teammate Radovan Somik minutes into Sunday's 4-1 win at Washington. Somik was cross-checked from behind by Capitals defenseman Brendan Witt so hard that he crashed into Amonte, buckling Amonte's knee at an awkward angle. It could have much worse had Amonte not been able to free his knee quickly.
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Starting strong safety Leonard Smith, who was unable to play in January's Super Bowl because of a mysterious knee infection, failed his physical yesterday and was waived by the Buffalo Bills. Smith's recovery from the infection has been slow, and he wasn't expected to be ready for the opening of camp. Still, his dismissal was a surprise to him. Coach Marv Levy said the Bills felt that it would be a long time before Smith was able to play - if at all - and that the team couldn't wait.
SPORTS
May 10, 1996 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mikael Renberg had just one goal in eight playoff games before last night, so he should have been happy after scoring a pair of goals at Miami Arena. But the gutsy right winger couldn't celebrate, because the Flyers lost to the Florida Panthers, 4-3, in overtime of Game 4 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Renberg led all scorers in the game despite playing with a painful strained pelvic tendon. "We should have won," Renberg said glumly. "Some games are better than others for me. I got to play a lot in this game, so maybe the stomach was a little warmer.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How does one roast a gospel 'Bird? Tenderly. The R & B singer Bobby Womack, in black hat and brim, had the first opportunity to flame the Dixie Hummingbirds last night at their 70th anniversary gala and could do nothing but praise the iron men of the Lord's music. "I don't have the seniority to roast them," said Womack, 54. Albertina Walker, the great gospel singer, stepped to the podium next. Her toughest shot: "They were such gentlemen. " Years ago, when Walker was managing the Chicago group the Caravans, she found herself on the road with the 'Birds, so she asked their leader and founder, James Davis, how he managed to keep the guys in line when everyone else was running around.
SPORTS
November 5, 2004 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kyle Korver really didn't mind being on the basketball court for the entire fourth quarter in the 76ers' season-opening, come-from-behind win over the Boston Celtics. "Tired? It's the first game of the season. No one's tired yet," Korver said yesterday at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, where the Sixers reviewed the Boston game and prepared for tonight's home opener against Phoenix. Sixers coach Jim O'Brien didn't make a single substitution in the fourth quarter Wednesday night against the Celtics.
NEWS
April 27, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James B. Davis Sr., 90, founder of the Philadelphia gospel group the Dixie Hummingbirds, the iron men of the Lord's music who inspired stars as disparate as Jackie Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Bobby Bland and the Temptations and won a Grammy in 1974 for "Loves Me Like a Rock," died of heart failure Tuesday at Hahnemann University Hospital. He lived in Fairmount. "We made pure joy music," said Ira Tucker Sr., 81, lead singer who joined the quartet in 1938 when they were touring churches throughout the Southeast.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James B. Davis Sr., 90, founder of the Philadelphia gospel group the Dixie Hummingbirds, the iron men of the Lord's music who inspired stars as disparate as Jackie Wilson, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Bobby Bland and the Temptations and won a Grammy in 1974 for "Loves Me Like a Rock," died of heart failure Tuesday at Hahnemann University Hospital. He lived in Fairmount. "We made pure joy music," said Ira Tucker Sr., 81, lead singer who joined the quartet in 1938 when they were touring churches throughout the Southeast.
SPORTS
November 5, 2004 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kyle Korver really didn't mind being on the basketball court for the entire fourth quarter in the 76ers' season-opening, come-from-behind win over the Boston Celtics. "Tired? It's the first game of the season. No one's tired yet," Korver said yesterday at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, where the Sixers reviewed the Boston game and prepared for tonight's home opener against Phoenix. Sixers coach Jim O'Brien didn't make a single substitution in the fourth quarter Wednesday night against the Celtics.
SPORTS
January 28, 2004 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coach Ken Hitchcock called it a "best-case scenario. " Flyers right winger Tony Amonte could miss 10 to 14 days with a partial tear of the medial collateral ligament in his right knee. An MRI late Monday confirmed the tear. Amonte was plowed into by teammate Radovan Somik minutes into Sunday's 4-1 win at Washington. Somik was cross-checked from behind by Capitals defenseman Brendan Witt so hard that he crashed into Amonte, buckling Amonte's knee at an awkward angle. It could have much worse had Amonte not been able to free his knee quickly.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How does one roast a gospel 'Bird? Tenderly. The R & B singer Bobby Womack, in black hat and brim, had the first opportunity to flame the Dixie Hummingbirds last night at their 70th anniversary gala and could do nothing but praise the iron men of the Lord's music. "I don't have the seniority to roast them," said Womack, 54. Albertina Walker, the great gospel singer, stepped to the podium next. Her toughest shot: "They were such gentlemen. " Years ago, when Walker was managing the Chicago group the Caravans, she found herself on the road with the 'Birds, so she asked their leader and founder, James Davis, how he managed to keep the guys in line when everyone else was running around.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rules of the gospel road were unforgiving. No outside women could ride in the Dixie Hummingbirds' car. "If there was a woman," says James Davis, "she'd better be your wife. " Come in five minutes late for rehearsal, best bring your $5. And forget whiskey, because the 'Birds sang in pulpits. Image was so important that no member could be seen playing anything on the jukebox other than the Lord's music. It was Davis, the vocal quartet's founder and steadying hand, who wound up paying the only fine for a jukebox transgression.
SPORTS
April 23, 1997 | By Bill Iezzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
George School coach Scott Spence calls him the Iron Man. Teammates embrace him as their iron man and most artful dodger. However he is described, junior Adam Decker, the top point scorer on the boys' lacrosse team, is the spark that fires up the Cougars during the entire 40 minutes of play. Decker wasn't always as resilient as he is now, so he had to rely on his wits to get the ball past the goalkeeper. As a 5-foot-8, 145-pound freshman, the Solebury Township resident played varsity crease attack, a position in which a player takes a pounding around the net. Sneakiness enabled him to score 27 goals that year, he said, because he had learned how to view the net before catching the ball and flinging it past the goalie as he was about to be hit. As a 5-10, 155-pound sophomore, Decker played attack and a little midfield, where he shed his sneaky shoes for those of a dancer, dodging defenders on his way to the net. He soon learned that as a midfielder he had to do a lot of running in order to play defense and offense, and that was where his soccer skills came in handy.
SPORTS
May 10, 1996 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mikael Renberg had just one goal in eight playoff games before last night, so he should have been happy after scoring a pair of goals at Miami Arena. But the gutsy right winger couldn't celebrate, because the Flyers lost to the Florida Panthers, 4-3, in overtime of Game 4 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Renberg led all scorers in the game despite playing with a painful strained pelvic tendon. "We should have won," Renberg said glumly. "Some games are better than others for me. I got to play a lot in this game, so maybe the stomach was a little warmer.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | By Cathy Young
The battle over the Virginia Military Institute, which reached the U.S. Supreme Court last week, may have appealed to many feminists as a simple, old-fashioned women's rights cause: crashing the gates of an all-male institution. But the issue, it turns out, isn't all that simple. The opposition now includes not only conservative groups like the Independent Women's Forum, but bona fide feminists like legal scholar Susan Estrich. Forcing VMI to go coed, they say, would imperil America's 87 surviving single-sex colleges and universities - 82 of them women's schools.
SPORTS
February 3, 1995 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 76ers' annoying medical woes arose again yesterday, the morning after their first victory in six games, and this time the subject didn't include rickety center Shawn Bradley. Rather, point guard B.J. Tyler strained a stomach muscle at practice, prompting coach John Lucas to consider getting another player. Lucas said that shooting guard Jeff Malone, who has been out for almost two months, was going to seek a new opinion on his aching right heel later yesterday. If Tyler is unable to play next week, Lucas cannot make do without both players.
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Starting strong safety Leonard Smith, who was unable to play in January's Super Bowl because of a mysterious knee infection, failed his physical yesterday and was waived by the Buffalo Bills. Smith's recovery from the infection has been slow, and he wasn't expected to be ready for the opening of camp. Still, his dismissal was a surprise to him. Coach Marv Levy said the Bills felt that it would be a long time before Smith was able to play - if at all - and that the team couldn't wait.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|