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NEWS
April 29, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Richard Hauptschein's 11-year-old son, Jeff, a swimmer and baseball player, told him a year and a half ago that the father needed to do something competitive, Hauptschein wasn't about to let the challenge go unanswered. After all, the 48-year-old Kennett Square resident and manager for the DuPont Co. had been a swimmer for Columbia University for four years, and was good enough to win a triathlon (biking, swimming and running) in Massachusetts, which qualified him for the Ironman competition in Hawaii in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | Inquirer photographs by Rebecca Barger
It takes an iron will to compete in the Ironman, the ultimate triathlon, in Hawaii. Russell Schwartz, 29, a Center City jeweler who lives in Mayfair, has forged himself into an athlete equal to the Ironman: a 2 1/2-mile ocean swim, a 112-mile bike race and a 26.2-mile run (a full marathon).
NEWS
June 27, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After her second fall in as many weeks of Ironman bike training, Maria Simone could hear the Voices. Fortunately, the Rowan University associate professor - who is blogging and raising scholarship money as she prepares - listened to her husband instead. "He told me to be an Ironman," Simone, 36, recalls. "And something about that got in my head. I got back on the bike, and we finished the ride. " Simone and her husband, John Jenkins, 37, live in Absecon and are training for the July 25 Ironman triathlon in Lake Placid, N.Y. It's one of 24 qualifying races worldwide for the Big Kahuna - the Oct. 9 Ironman in Hawaii, where the first of these extreme endurance competitions was held in 1978.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | BY BARBARA LAKER, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
G. CHRIS Gleason was no weekend warrior. He was one of those rare, elite, finely tuned athletes who had mastered the world's toughest triathlon, the Ironman. He completed the grueling event three times. To hear the announcer proclaim, " You are an Ironman!" at the finish line, Gleason had to swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles, then run a full 26.2-mile marathon - in succession without a break. Each time, Gleason got faster. He finished his last Ironman in Lake Placid, N.Y., in July in an amazing 10 hours 11 minutes 4 seconds, placing 64th out of 2,902 competitors.
SPORTS
March 26, 2006 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
A week after setting a franchise record for futility, the Soul upset the league-leading Dallas Desperados, 55-51, in an Arena League game last night at the American Airlines Center. The Soul (5-4) had scored only 20 points on March 18 in a loss to Columbus, but they ended a four-game winning streak by the Desperados (7-2). Steve Smith, who played for the Soul last season and was reacquired in a trade with Kansas City last week, was named Ironman of the Game with eight catches for 98 yards and two touchdowns, plus three kickoff returns for 42 yards.
SPORTS
July 10, 2006 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scene along Kelly Drive yesterday for the first Philadelphia Women's Triathlon appeared at times to be a Mother's Day celebration. Supporters turned out wearing T-shirts that read "Women Tri Harder," and some held homemade "Go Mommy" signs for the inaugural race. Hollie Kenney, 33, from Baltimore, became the first winner in the swim-bike-run event with a time of 1 hour, 12 minutes, 47 seconds. "This event was so much fun," said Kenney, a 16-year triathlon veteran. "The course is great.
NEWS
November 28, 1995 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1991, Jan Wanklyn won the women's Ironman world-series championship and then decided to retire from the grinding competition that includes swimming, biking and running. She said she would only run marathons. But when you're married to Ken Glah, who has won the men's Ironman title, and you travel with him to events, it can be hard to resist the desire to compete in them. That was the case for the Australian-born Wanklyn, 37, who was a physical education teacher before getting into triathlons.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Straub looked at her watch with just two miles to go in the sprint distance of the TriRock Philadelphia Triathlon on Saturday and knew she was having a good race. It would take more than an hour before she found out how good. Nearby, Tyler Ems of Moorestown waited for the results. The race's staggered start, which makes swimming less dangerous, meant the winner wouldn't have to be the first to finish. Ems, 22, had crossed the finish line first by a wide margin and wondered: Would his time stand?
SPORTS
June 22, 2012 | By Alex Lee, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR THE PAST decade, two things have consumed large chunks of Malvern native Tom Kramer's time. The first is his training regimen. Kramer, 46, is a practicing triathlete who will compete Saturday morning in the eighth annual Philadelphia Insurance Triathlon in Fairmount Park. The second is the search for a bone-marrow match for his wife Pam, also a triathlete, who was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia in 2000 and eventually willl need a bone marrow transplant. At some point, Kramer made a creative decision to have those cumbersome obligations intersect.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, FOR THE INQUIRER
Triathlete Chris Anderson came down with a sore throat about a week ago. And Thursday he finished his last training ride abruptly when a spoke broke and punctured the rear tire of his state-of-the-art, all carbon fiber and very custom bike. "I was just riding on some flat and talking to other riders on the last loop, and just kind of warming down when I heard this thing go twang," said Anderson, 22, of Radnor. Anderson took both incidents in stride. That's pretty remarkable, considering he left Friday to take part in the World Triathlon Championships in Manchester, England, as a member of the United States national team.
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NEWS
April 14, 2015
A LI JACKSON, 27, of Bala Cynwyd, is owner and head personal trainer of Never Give Up Training, a total-body fitness center in Manayunk that offers a variety of group fitness classes and personalized training. Jackson, an Ironman triathlete, opened her studio in March 2013. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I'm a personal trainer and had taught fitness classes around Philadelphia. I realized there was a void for a studio that offered both personalized training and group activities.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Athletes will get a chance to test their endurance next fall when the first half-Ironman distance race comes to New Jersey. World Triathlon Corp. announced plans to hold its first Ironman triathlon in the state on Sept. 21 in Mercer County Park in West Windsor. "It was time to develop an event there," Steve Meckfessel, managing director for Global Race Operations, said Wednesday. "It's a beautiful part of the country. " The event, known as Ironman 70.3 Princeton, is expected to attract more than 2,500 professional and amateur competitors from across the country.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Straub looked at her watch with just two miles to go in the sprint distance of the TriRock Philadelphia Triathlon on Saturday and knew she was having a good race. It would take more than an hour before she found out how good. Nearby, Tyler Ems of Moorestown waited for the results. The race's staggered start, which makes swimming less dangerous, meant the winner wouldn't have to be the first to finish. Ems, 22, had crossed the finish line first by a wide margin and wondered: Would his time stand?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Candace Gantt bends over her Trek handlebars, her back racer-flat. She's concentrating on the stretch of pavement ahead as she negotiates the gentle hills and valleys of the narrow, two-lane road in Willistown Township. Biking is one of her fondest joys. Two weeks earlier, this tall and tanned 48-year-old, with a resting heart rate of 48, had completed her first Half Ironman at Lake Placid, N.Y. On this clear day, July 21, 2005, while daughters Carter, 11, and Morgan, 4, are at camp, Gantt and her training buddy Mary Wood are four miles into a new 15-mile route.
SPORTS
June 22, 2012 | By Alex Lee, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR THE PAST decade, two things have consumed large chunks of Malvern native Tom Kramer's time. The first is his training regimen. Kramer, 46, is a practicing triathlete who will compete Saturday morning in the eighth annual Philadelphia Insurance Triathlon in Fairmount Park. The second is the search for a bone-marrow match for his wife Pam, also a triathlete, who was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia in 2000 and eventually willl need a bone marrow transplant. At some point, Kramer made a creative decision to have those cumbersome obligations intersect.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | BY BARBARA LAKER, lakerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5933
G. CHRIS Gleason was no weekend warrior. He was one of those rare, elite, finely tuned athletes who had mastered the world's toughest triathlon, the Ironman. He completed the grueling event three times. To hear the announcer proclaim, " You are an Ironman!" at the finish line, Gleason had to swim 2.4 miles, bike 112 miles, then run a full 26.2-mile marathon - in succession without a break. Each time, Gleason got faster. He finished his last Ironman in Lake Placid, N.Y., in July in an amazing 10 hours 11 minutes 4 seconds, placing 64th out of 2,902 competitors.
SPORTS
November 21, 2011 | BY JEFF JANICZEK, janiczj@phillynews.com
WITH ARMS raised high, resembling the iconic Rocky statue in the distance, Ethiopian runner Folisho Tuko crossed the finish line in front of the Art Museum victorious yesterday morning. With ideal weather conditions in his favor, Tuko took first place in the 18th annual Philadelphia Marathon with a time of 2 hours, 19 minutes, 16 seconds on the 26.2-mile course, which ran though the city and along the Schuylkill River. "I was thinking I could win this," said Tuko, 25, who took home the $3,500 grand prize.
NEWS
June 27, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After her second fall in as many weeks of Ironman bike training, Maria Simone could hear the Voices. Fortunately, the Rowan University associate professor - who is blogging and raising scholarship money as she prepares - listened to her husband instead. "He told me to be an Ironman," Simone, 36, recalls. "And something about that got in my head. I got back on the bike, and we finished the ride. " Simone and her husband, John Jenkins, 37, live in Absecon and are training for the July 25 Ironman triathlon in Lake Placid, N.Y. It's one of 24 qualifying races worldwide for the Big Kahuna - the Oct. 9 Ironman in Hawaii, where the first of these extreme endurance competitions was held in 1978.
SPORTS
June 20, 2007 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The moment of truth for Andy Rosebrook occurred five years ago, when he stood in front of a mirror, counted more than one chin, learned that his percentage of body fat was in the low 30s, and realized that the scrawny teen who once excelled at cross-country had become the Pillsbury Doughboy. "I thought to myself, 'I can do better than this,' " Rosebrook said. "My percentage of body fat was telling me I was obese. " Rosebrook's transformation from a puffy 5-foot-10, 230-pounder to a lean 175 pounds began commonly enough with a weight-loss program at work.
NEWS
April 29, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Richard Hauptschein's 11-year-old son, Jeff, a swimmer and baseball player, told him a year and a half ago that the father needed to do something competitive, Hauptschein wasn't about to let the challenge go unanswered. After all, the 48-year-old Kennett Square resident and manager for the DuPont Co. had been a swimmer for Columbia University for four years, and was good enough to win a triathlon (biking, swimming and running) in Massachusetts, which qualified him for the Ironman competition in Hawaii in the mid-1980s.
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