CollectionsIronman Triathlon
IN THE NEWS

Ironman Triathlon

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Candace Gantt bends over her Trek handlebars, her back racer-flat. She's concentrating on the stretch of pavement ahead as she negotiates the gentle hills and valleys of the narrow, two-lane road in Willistown Township. Biking is one of her fondest joys. Two weeks earlier, this tall and tanned 48-year-old, with a resting heart rate of 48, had completed her first Half Ironman at Lake Placid, N.Y. On this clear day, July 21, 2005, while daughters Carter, 11, and Morgan, 4, are at camp, Gantt and her training buddy Mary Wood are four miles into a new 15-mile route.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
COZUMEL, Mexico - Matt Miller had dreamed of this moment - nearly died, by all rights should have died, in pursuit of this moment - and now it was here. He had come to this Mexican resort to compete in an Ironman Triathlon - 2.4 miles of swimming in the sea and 112 miles on a bicycle, followed by a full marathon on foot, 26.2 miles. Matt, now 22, of Wayne was training for a triathlon two years ago when he lost control of his bike on the Blue Ridge Parkway and swerved into an oncoming Porsche.
SPORTS
June 20, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cliff Cheek competed in his first triathlon in 2001 on the recommendation of two doctors. The first was his general physician, who noted Cheek's good health and athletic ability and suggested a triathlon as a way to expand his exercise repertoire. The second doctor was one of Cheek's friends, Richard Hamilton. Hamilton had raced in triathlons before, and he invited Cheek and another runner, Austin Meehan, to compete with him. And just like that, the trio from Jenkintown participated in their first triathlon together in Stone Harbor, N.J. They didn't stop there.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Mike Bradley, Special to The Inquirer
You see it every year on television. A lone figure stumbles down a darkened highway on the verge of collapse. Supporters cheer the pathetic figure while announcers prattle on about courage and determination. The image is courtesy of ABC Sports and its coverage of the Ironman Triathlon, the sporting world's premiere test of endurance, stamina and - some may say - insanity. For many, the Ironman is the saga of the final finisher, barely able to put one leg in front of the other and only moments from an ambulance.
SPORTS
January 10, 2000 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
La Salle's Donnie Carr looked like one of those Ironman Triathlon competitors as they wash ashore after the 2.4-mile ocean swim. Wrung out. Completely drained. Then the pregame warmup ended and it was time for Carr to start - ready or not - his comeback from a bad case of pneumonia, which floored him for more than a month and put him in Graduate Hospital for 10 days. The Explorers' senior leader tried, thinking that 70 percent strength and 100 percent desire and support might add up to enough to help La Salle end one of the worst stretches of the Speedy Morris era. Twenty-nine minutes of the real Donnie Carr would have made a difference.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At age 55 and after three years of hard work, Jon Batchelor of Haddonfield is just beginning to dream of athletic success. Well, actually Batchelor has had some previous successes, including his years at Haddonfield High School, where he played football, basketball and baseball, and as Eastern High School's head football coach from 1969 to 1986. What's new is the sport. Batchelor began competing in triathlons just three years ago. And only two weeks ago he hit his best time ever, taking 2 hours, 41 minutes to complete the Pine Barrens Triathlon course - a 1-mile swim, 25-mile bike ride and 6.2-mile run. Batchelor took third place in the 50-and-older group.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Being nationally ranked obviously feels good. But for some area amateur triathletes in Tri-Jersey, a local triathletes' organization, yearly rankings are a convenient way to judge their progress and set their goals for the coming year. After about eight years of releasing his frustrations and tensions through competition, Merchantville's Bernie Kitchula has risen to 19th from 56th place in the men's national standings for the 45-to-49 age group. The rankings are compiled by Tri-Fed, the sport's governing body, and published in the January/ February issue of Triathlon Times.
SPORTS
January 4, 2001 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was 10 years ago that Steve Brown was first mesmerized by the Ironman Triathlon, the endurance event held every year in Hawaii, the one that requires a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a 26.2-mile run. "I sat in a room fixed on the TV," Brown said. "It seemed like such a mental and physical obstacle. I had so much admiration for anyone who can go through it, not just the 8 1/2-hour finishers, but the back-of-the-pack mortals. " Brown, 40, a graduate of Haverford High and Cabrini College, is now an Ironman himself.
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ken Glah did not get to spend as much time training for the Ironman Triathlon in Auckland, New Zealand, as he would have liked. The reason: His wife, Jan, is expecting their first child soon. The limited training, six to seven weeks, did not hurt him, however, as he took first place in the Auckland competition March 7 with a time of 8 hours, 38 minutes and 29 seconds. The New Zealand event is the first in a series of six that make up the International Ironman World Series.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
There comes a point in a triathlon when the body says enough is enough and it begins to shut down, system by system, muscle by muscle. This is exactly what happened to Jeff Devlin, a West Chester resident and one of the world's top triathletes this month at the Ironman Triathlon in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. The Ironman is the longest and most grueling triathlon in the sport and will be shown on ABC-TV on Dec. 7. After swimming 2.4 miles, cycling 112 miles and running about half of the final leg of the race - a 26.2-mile marathon - Devlin was in second place, feeling great and closing the distance on Mark Allen, the top-ranked triathlete.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 20, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cliff Cheek competed in his first triathlon in 2001 on the recommendation of two doctors. The first was his general physician, who noted Cheek's good health and athletic ability and suggested a triathlon as a way to expand his exercise repertoire. The second doctor was one of Cheek's friends, Richard Hamilton. Hamilton had raced in triathlons before, and he invited Cheek and another runner, Austin Meehan, to compete with him. And just like that, the trio from Jenkintown participated in their first triathlon together in Stone Harbor, N.J. They didn't stop there.
SPORTS
October 31, 2013 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
At a chain restaurant off City Avenue on Tuesday, Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie was waiting for our waitress to deliver his lunch: a spinach salad and pepperoni pizza combo. His team - which is expected, and in many ways has been constructed, to be the worst in the NBA - opens its season Wednesday night against LeBron James and the two-time defending champion Miami Heat. There was no point to pussyfooting around the question at the core of the franchise's immediate future. So, Sam, how do you justify tanking?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Candace Gantt bends over her Trek handlebars, her back racer-flat. She's concentrating on the stretch of pavement ahead as she negotiates the gentle hills and valleys of the narrow, two-lane road in Willistown Township. Biking is one of her fondest joys. Two weeks earlier, this tall and tanned 48-year-old, with a resting heart rate of 48, had completed her first Half Ironman at Lake Placid, N.Y. On this clear day, July 21, 2005, while daughters Carter, 11, and Morgan, 4, are at camp, Gantt and her training buddy Mary Wood are four miles into a new 15-mile route.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
COZUMEL, Mexico - Matt Miller had dreamed of this moment - nearly died, by all rights should have died, in pursuit of this moment - and now it was here. He had come to this Mexican resort to compete in an Ironman Triathlon - 2.4 miles of swimming in the sea and 112 miles on a bicycle, followed by a full marathon on foot, 26.2 miles. Matt, now 22, of Wayne was training for a triathlon two years ago when he lost control of his bike on the Blue Ridge Parkway and swerved into an oncoming Porsche.
SPORTS
October 12, 2002 | By Kristian Pope INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ordinarily, their individual paths would have hardly crossed on their own. But next weekend in Hawaii, the lives of two Philadelphia-area athletes will come together for one common reason: the love of an uphill battle. A week from today, Stuart Trager of Philadelphia and Ken Glah of West Chester will join approximately 1,500 other athletes from around the world on the jagged, lava-laden terrain of Kona, Hawaii, to push themselves to unimaginable lengths in the Ironman Triathlon World Championships.
SPORTS
January 4, 2001 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was 10 years ago that Steve Brown was first mesmerized by the Ironman Triathlon, the endurance event held every year in Hawaii, the one that requires a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, and a 26.2-mile run. "I sat in a room fixed on the TV," Brown said. "It seemed like such a mental and physical obstacle. I had so much admiration for anyone who can go through it, not just the 8 1/2-hour finishers, but the back-of-the-pack mortals. " Brown, 40, a graduate of Haverford High and Cabrini College, is now an Ironman himself.
SPORTS
January 10, 2000 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
La Salle's Donnie Carr looked like one of those Ironman Triathlon competitors as they wash ashore after the 2.4-mile ocean swim. Wrung out. Completely drained. Then the pregame warmup ended and it was time for Carr to start - ready or not - his comeback from a bad case of pneumonia, which floored him for more than a month and put him in Graduate Hospital for 10 days. The Explorers' senior leader tried, thinking that 70 percent strength and 100 percent desire and support might add up to enough to help La Salle end one of the worst stretches of the Speedy Morris era. Twenty-nine minutes of the real Donnie Carr would have made a difference.
SPORTS
August 1, 1999 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Karen Smyers heard the roar of the tractor trailer approaching from behind, she thought little of it. Trucks always rushed past within a foot or two of the handlebars of Smyers' bike and certainly weren't distraction enough to slow the best woman triathlete in the world as she raced through another training ride toward the 2000 Games, where triathlon will be introduced as an Olympic sport. But this wouldn't be just another training day for Smyers or another truck blasting along the peaceful roads surrounding Lincoln, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1998 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, FOR THE INQUIRER
Has he lost his mind? Can he see or is he blind? Can he walk at all, Or if he moves will he fall? Is he alive or dead? - Black Sabbath, "Iron Man" At least that's the way heavy-metal rocker Ozzy Ozbourne sees Iron Man, definitely not the sports jock imagined by the organizers of the Wilkes-Barre Half-Ironman triathlon on Aug. 9 - even though some athletes might be found mumbling those very words at the finish line....
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ken Glah did not get to spend as much time training for the Ironman Triathlon in Auckland, New Zealand, as he would have liked. The reason: His wife, Jan, is expecting their first child soon. The limited training, six to seven weeks, did not hurt him, however, as he took first place in the Auckland competition March 7 with a time of 8 hours, 38 minutes and 29 seconds. The New Zealand event is the first in a series of six that make up the International Ironman World Series.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|