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Irony

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NEWS
October 17, 2001 | By REG HENRY
IRONY, the friend of satirists and constant companion of current events for many generations, has died, according to press reports. The cause of death was believed to be chronic irrelevance in the current national mood, but Irony had been in poor health for years. Indeed, Irony was seldom recognized by the American public whenever he did appear in any event, story, play, song or newspaper column. Irony had hoped to make a connection with a younger generation with the release of the 1995 Alanis Morissette song "Ironic.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
A Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks performance is: A. The act of an above-average indie-pop tunesmith reinventing himself behind extended guitar jams that can politely be described as atonal. B. Similar to one by Malkmus' old band, Pavement - some good songs, some flaccid instrumental stretches, and plenty of ironic chitchat between the crowd and the singer-guitarist with the God's-gift cheekbones. C. Both of the above. Answer: C, as evidenced at Tuesday night's Trocadero show.
NEWS
July 27, 1986
How ironic that Hollywood director John Landis, who was part and parcel of the Vietnam protest mob, finds himself on trial for the very charge he hurled at us Vietnam vets - the killing of Vietnamese children. It is probably the best Twilight Zone episode ever, because he was trying to make us look like child killers, and in his "artistic endeavor" to portray us as such he is alleged to have killed Vietnamese children. I just hope that there are some Viet vets on his jury who find it in their hearts to forgive his mean spirit.
NEWS
June 12, 2008
AS AN African-American, I find it ironic that Barack Obama would win the Democratic nomination the same week he visited Mount Rushmore. He must have had mixed feelings seeing the sculptures of Washington and Jefferson, who owned slaves and yet declared all men are created equal. Days later, Obama spoke before thousands of people of nearly every race as the first African-American to win a major party endorsement for the president. Stuart M. Burgh Jr., Philadelphia But will it work for oil?
NEWS
September 29, 2005
ALL AMERICANS should remember Arnhem, Holland, where Joran van der Sloot, a suspect in the murder of Natalee Holloway, now lives with his father. Arnhem was famous for a major battle during WWII. It was was in the movie "A Bridge Too Far" and was the scene of fighting described in "Band of Brothers. " The military operation called Market Garden, designed to shorten the war, was a failure, costing many U.S. and British lives owing to shoddy planning by British Gen. Bernard Montgomery over the objections of Lt. Gen. George Patton.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
What must Justice Thurgood Marshall think as he sits, stewing, over the nomination of Clarence Thomas? Perhaps that if you live long enough, the last sense you need is a keen sense of irony. How ironic to spend a lifetime opening doors for American blacks and to see a successor coming through those doors who disagrees with much that you hold dear. What was it Marshall said in his cranky farewell press conference? Don't use race as a ploy or an excuse for "doing wrong," he advised the President.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Five people painters - four with no interest in irony and each engaged seriously with content, and the fifth artist interested in satire - are exhibiting at Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts on the riverfront. These regional artists vary in their approach to allegorical expression. Three - Stephen Tanis, Lisa Bartolozzi and Nora Sturges - paint ordinary human beings from direct observation, and they include some degree of allegory to broaden their perspective on humanity.
NEWS
October 3, 2010
In a season already marked by strange switches and unexpected twists, of course Kevin Kolb would end up being the quarterback who faced off against Donovan McNabb in his first game back, just as the script had been written from Easter Sunday until Concussion Sunday. It couldn't have happened any differently, and if you like irony with your football, all it took was a rib injury to starter Michael Vick, just as all it took last season was a rib injury to McNabb to get Kolb the first under-fire audition that must have really impressed the coaches.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | By Hannah Greene
It is about 11:30 on a Friday night, and two friends and I, being a certain general species of young person, have joined the ranks of our ironic-T-shirt-wearing brothers and sisters at the Llanerch Diner. (The object of the "Llanerch Game," it has been explained to me, is to go hang out there, on a day and time likely to be busy, and not see a single person you know. Few have been known to win, and we are no exception. Someone's older brother is sighted through the window while I am still parking the car. Is he still in that band?
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NEWS
March 18, 2014 | BY CHRIS RABB
RECASTING the overarching narrative that - outside of sports and music - black men and boys are assets vs. a drain on society is a radical one, based on invisible truths that are no less real. This is the apparent goal of the White House's recent My Brother's Keeper initiative. However, there is another challenging truth that makes this bold civic strategy more complex: The reason African-Americans are in this country at all is because our black ancestors were also highly valuable assets, literally.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
POLICE say the Valencia, Calif., area where "Fast & Furious" star Paul Walker died in a car crash is known to attract street racers. Walker and his friend and financial adviser Roger Rodas died in the one-car crash Saturday. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department already has said speed was a factor. The street where the crash happened forms a loop amid commercial buildings that is isolated from traffic, especially on weekends. Fans of Walker continued to gather yesterday at the site, leaving flowers and memorabilia from the movie franchise about fast cars that made him famous.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on Wednesday was sent to serve his child-molestation prison sentence at an institution in far southwestern Pennsylvania that includes most of the state's death row inmates. The Corrections Department said that Sandusky was transferred to Greene State Prison after being evaluated at a facility outside Harrisburg. Prison officials said he will be housed in protective custody. "We make individual decisions based on facts," Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said in a written statement.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | Kevin Riordan
The landmarks Camden has lost or tossed away could fill a hall of shame. They include long-gone but still-beloved buildings like the Stanley Theater, the Walt Whitman Hotel, and the Broadway Methodist Church, a list to which the shuttered Sears store on Admiral Wilson Boulevard soon will be added. Let's point out that the disappearance of any single structure in Camden has been far less damaging to the city's viability than the wholesale clearance of blocks along Broadway, Mickle, Federal, and Market between the Delaware River and 10th Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Larry Platt, Editor, Philadelphia Daily News
YOU PROBABLY haven't heard of him, but, among the insulated world of Philadelphia's journalistic and political cognoscenti, there's long been a very special celebrity, someone mayors and governors and editors and talking heads alike go out of their way not only to greet, but to befriend. He is perhaps the only Philadelphian beloved by both Democrats and Republicans, and by competing beat writers. He is not someone with a privileged position or a lot of power. He simply has a huge heart, a mischievous smile and an infectious way of looking at the world — and this makes people want him to like them.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
ADMITTEDLY, when we called the white building at Broad and Callowhill streets the "Tower of Truth," there was a touch of irony. Reporters are big on irony. The papers are moving out of the tower soon. Recently, the management took big steps away from the truth. Even allowing for irony, it's a self-destructive act for newspapers that are already in deep trouble. Newspapers are businesses. That was true when they were obscenely profitable, and it's still true, even now that much of the money has migrated to things like circulars and Craigslist.
NEWS
November 22, 2011
In 2007, then-Penn State president Graham B. Spanier lectured the Pennsylvania State Senate on the many, many reasons his university ought to be exempt from a state open-records law then under consideration. "This bill does far more than feed the prurient interests of newspaper editors who are looking for a headline about how much Coach Paterno makes," he warned. If only Spanier had been equally worried about the alleged prurient interests of former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky.
SPORTS
May 5, 2011
BOSTON - There were 5 minutes and 49 seconds remaining in the second period last night and the noise in TD Garden was as deafening as it had been since the first 2 minutes. The Bruins had just tacked on a third goal, but here was Nikolay Zherdev alone behind the Bruins' net, puck on stick, and here came Andrej Meszaros unchecked down the slot, the pass going tape to tape. You know what happened next. Bruins goalie Tim Thomas stoned him, absorbed the rebound, and Meszaros and Zherdev lowered their heads as they skated to the bench.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
By Bill Bonvie The depiction of a knock-off Statue of Liberty on the U.S. Postal Service's new "forever" stamp has been called a "case of mistaken identity. " But the substitution of a Las Vegas casino's replica for the actual icon in New York Harbor couldn't be more symbolically suited to the United States of today. A century ago, that welcoming statue might well have represented the aspirations of those tired, poor, huddled masses yearning to breathe free, who believed this country offered everyone a chance to strive for a decent standard of living.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh, the ironies of life, they are many. In Speaking of Tongues, at Walnut Street Theatre's third-floor Independence stage, they are unstoppable - so many ironies pour forth, they begin to feel normal, and the play waters itself down. After a smartly written first act about the marital indiscretions of two couples - Tongues is by Australian playwright Andrew Bovell, screenwriter for the film Strictly Ballroom - the play moves on to consider the people these folks connected with in passing.
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