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Iroquois

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NEWS
July 28, 2013
In 1712, a farmer from New York sent his 16-year-old son to live with a local Mohawk tribe in the upper Schoharie Valley. This young man, Conrad Weiser, spent the winter of 1712-13 with tribe members and learned about their language and customs. Weiser went on to become an envoy and interpreter between the British colonial government and the Native tribes. Weiser was born in Germany in 1696 as Johann Conrad Weiser Jr., and immigrated to America with his family in the early 1700s. In 1720, Weiser married Anna Eve Feck (or Faeg)
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, FOR THE INQUIRER
The first thing that strikes you as you drive north toward town on the rolling hills along the southern part of Skaneateles Lake is the way all tension seems to ease out of your bones. Lush green corn fields hug the winding roadway. Cows and tidy farmhouses skim past. Then suddenly, just as you crest the hill at Route 41's Nine-Mile Point, the majestic sapphire lake appears below you, stretching all the way to the northern horizon. Forget about those tiny Poconos lakes or those suburban developer-made basins.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Most historians specializing in colonial Pennsylvania agree that a German immigrant named Conrad Weiser played a key role in maintaining security on the frontier of this region during the pre-Revolutionary War period. Weiser, who spent much of his life near what is now Reading, was the chief Indian agent for the province of Pennsylvania throughout his adult life. He was born near Herrenberg, Germany, in 1696 and immigrated with his family to colonial New York in 1710. As a young man he took up farming, married and started a family near Schoharie, N.Y. This was frontier territory and he came into contact with the Iroquois tribes of the Six Nations.
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It was one of those heart-stopping moments, a moment when disaster hangs on a delicate loop of rope or a hand on a lever. But what could be controlled was controlled. The physics, the workers, the location were set. The temperamental forklift was up and running. The cranes were humming. Sunlight washed over the crew of a dozen, and twice that many onlookers. Sculptor Mark di Suvero, apprehensive, 30 feet in the air, swung the forklift around and then slowly down; as he did, a massive crane lifted three tons of red-orange steel and gently, guided by five straining workers on the ground, moved it slowly into place.
REAL_ESTATE
October 24, 1997 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Iroquois, Wynnefield Heights, Philadelphia Built in the early 1960s and promoted as "The World's First All Electric Apartment Building . . . unequalled in its luxury," the Iroquois captured the attention of many from the Main Line who were ready to trade their large homes for apartment living. (Bala Cynwyd is just yards away across City Avenue.) Like the phoenix emblazoned in brass on the black-glazed brick building, the Iroquois lives on - and still stands out. Although it may not be considered luxurious by today's standards, it continues to reap kudos from residents, as well as awards from the Apartment Association of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 11, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A towering red sculpture by Mark di Suvero - known throughout the world for his fanciful steel I-beam constructions - has been approved by the Fairmount Park Commission for installation in a grassy area near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Placement of the 40-foot-high work, titled Iroquois and currently on long-term loan to the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., still must be approved by the city Art Commission. If that panel gives its blessing, Iroquois could be installed across from Eakins Oval in the shadow of the Philadelphian condo building - and across the roadway from Rocky - by spring.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonard Polis, 78, a charming and unconventional real estate developer whose masterpiece, the Iroquois apartment complex on City Avenue, is as distinctive and offbeat as its builder, died Sunday of cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. George Goldstone, whose company managed some of the many apartments built by Mr. Polis, called him a "free thinker" whose 13-story Iroquois shocked some onlookers with its glimmering black-stone facade, gold-colored balconies, and towering Indian eagle design affixed high.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Indian in the Cupboard" brings Hollywood's newfangled digital illusions to bear on Lynne Reid Banks' popular children's story about a boy who brings toy figurines to life. The movie is set in present-day Manhattan and told from the standpoint of a 9-year-old boy, cursed by his parents with the name Omri. "The Indian in the Cupboard," the story of Omri's magical coming of age, begins on his ninth birthday, when he receives an antique cupboard and a discarded key that opens the cupboard's rusty lock.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Ken Dilanian, Special to The Inquirer
Though the United States is home to many cultures, its education has been monocultural, North Penn teachers were told in a workshop last week. Betty Sing Luc and Nancy Rowch, representatives from Washington state-based Project REACH, were among several academicians from different ethnic backgrounds who spoke to North Penn administrators and 35 kindergarten through sixth-grade teachers on Thursday and Friday at the district's educational services...
SPORTS
June 20, 2008 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. men's under-19 lacrosse team, featuring three local players, will play an exhibition game tomorrow at the United Sports Training Center in Downingtown. Admission is free. The squad, which was assembled about two weeks ago, is playing a five-game exhibition schedule in preparation for the 2008 International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) U-19 World Championships, to be played July 3-12 in Coquitlam, British Columbia. Tomorrow's game, set for 4:30 p.m., is the third on the schedule.
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NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Macyk, Inquirer Staff Writer
The British are coming to Paoli on Saturday. And they're staying for two days. The Delaware Valley Friends girls' lacrosse team will host the team from Heathfield School, an all-girls' boarding academy 25 minutes west of London, in an exhibition game at 2 p.m. Saturday. Afterward, certain Dragons players will each take two visitors home to stay with their families and experience Philadelphia. The visit was spearheaded by Del-Val Friends' athletic department. "I spoke to [Heathfield's]
NEWS
July 28, 2013
In 1712, a farmer from New York sent his 16-year-old son to live with a local Mohawk tribe in the upper Schoharie Valley. This young man, Conrad Weiser, spent the winter of 1712-13 with tribe members and learned about their language and customs. Weiser went on to become an envoy and interpreter between the British colonial government and the Native tribes. Weiser was born in Germany in 1696 as Johann Conrad Weiser Jr., and immigrated to America with his family in the early 1700s. In 1720, Weiser married Anna Eve Feck (or Faeg)
BUSINESS
August 13, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just like many home buyers, some apartment-building investors paid high prices and took on huge amounts of debt in the middle of the last decade, leaving them squeezed by the nation's relentlessly weak economy. Resource Real Estate, a unit of Philadelphia's Resource America Inc., has been stepping into the gap, taking control of distressed apartment complexes on the cheap. But until this summer, it had steered clear of its hometown. "We just didn't see the value proposition for us. It's not that we don't like Philly," Alan F. Feldman, chief executive officer of Resource Real Estate, said this week.
SPORTS
July 16, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
As usual, it is about the papers again. The men, mostly those white men - also again, also as usual - have official papers upon which they have written their rules and their laws and their treaties. They are very sorry, but it is all there on the papers. The Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy have papers, too, but those are no good. It is a shame and everyone is very sorry, but those papers are meaningless. Please stop showing us your quaint, useless papers. The Iroquois, who were among the inventors of the game of lacrosse, perhaps as far back as 1,000 years ago, were invited to compete for the fourth straight time in the quadrennial world championships, currently being held in Manchester, England.
SPORTS
July 13, 2010 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Iroquois lacrosse team officials say their squad is being kept from the world championship of the sport invented by their ancestors because of a disagreement over passports. The 23 players had planned to travel Sunday to Manchester, England, on passports issued by the Iroquois Confederacy. But Tonya Gonnella Frichner, a member of the Onondaga Nation, said the State Department won't allow them to return to the United States with the documents. Frichner said the team has been offered U.S. passports, but the players refuse to carry them, because they see the U.S.-issued documents as an attack on their identity.
SPORTS
June 20, 2008 | By Kate Fagan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. men's under-19 lacrosse team, featuring three local players, will play an exhibition game tomorrow at the United Sports Training Center in Downingtown. Admission is free. The squad, which was assembled about two weeks ago, is playing a five-game exhibition schedule in preparation for the 2008 International Lacrosse Federation (ILF) U-19 World Championships, to be played July 3-12 in Coquitlam, British Columbia. Tomorrow's game, set for 4:30 p.m., is the third on the schedule.
NEWS
June 23, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It was one of those heart-stopping moments, a moment when disaster hangs on a delicate loop of rope or a hand on a lever. But what could be controlled was controlled. The physics, the workers, the location were set. The temperamental forklift was up and running. The cranes were humming. Sunlight washed over the crew of a dozen, and twice that many onlookers. Sculptor Mark di Suvero, apprehensive, 30 feet in the air, swung the forklift around and then slowly down; as he did, a massive crane lifted three tons of red-orange steel and gently, guided by five straining workers on the ground, moved it slowly into place.
NEWS
January 11, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A towering red sculpture by Mark di Suvero - known throughout the world for his fanciful steel I-beam constructions - has been approved by the Fairmount Park Commission for installation in a grassy area near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Placement of the 40-foot-high work, titled Iroquois and currently on long-term loan to the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, Mich., still must be approved by the city Art Commission. If that panel gives its blessing, Iroquois could be installed across from Eakins Oval in the shadow of the Philadelphian condo building - and across the roadway from Rocky - by spring.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Most historians specializing in colonial Pennsylvania agree that a German immigrant named Conrad Weiser played a key role in maintaining security on the frontier of this region during the pre-Revolutionary War period. Weiser, who spent much of his life near what is now Reading, was the chief Indian agent for the province of Pennsylvania throughout his adult life. He was born near Herrenberg, Germany, in 1696 and immigrated with his family to colonial New York in 1710. As a young man he took up farming, married and started a family near Schoharie, N.Y. This was frontier territory and he came into contact with the Iroquois tribes of the Six Nations.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonard Polis, 78, a charming and unconventional real estate developer whose masterpiece, the Iroquois apartment complex on City Avenue, is as distinctive and offbeat as its builder, died Sunday of cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. George Goldstone, whose company managed some of the many apartments built by Mr. Polis, called him a "free thinker" whose 13-story Iroquois shocked some onlookers with its glimmering black-stone facade, gold-colored balconies, and towering Indian eagle design affixed high.
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