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Isaac Asimov

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NEWS
April 7, 1992 | by Andrew Kirtzman, New York Daily News
Isaac Asimov, the beloved, mutton-chopped author who helped pioneer modern science-fiction writing, died yesterday at age 72. Asimov died at 2:20 a.m. at New York University Hospital of heart and kidney failure, said his brother, Stanley. Asimov told a New York gathering of writers and artists in January that his recent bout with prostate problems made him wish for death. But the comment seemed at odds with his enormous thirst for life, typified by his unprecedented output of books and articles that landed him in the Guinness Book of World Records as the American author with the most titles to his name.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the death of Isaac Asimov yesterday at the age of 72, the world lost one of its greatest explainers. During a writing career that lasted 54 years, Asimov churned out 467 books, thousands of magazine articles and tens of millions of words on nonfiction subjects ranging from nuclear physics to the Bible. He was also one of the finest science fiction writers of modern times, winning the prestigious Hugo award - the equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize for science fiction - for three of his early novels, known as the Foundation trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988 | By Clarke Taylor, Special to The Inquirer
Isaac Asimov takes his writing very seriously. In fact, the prolific science-fiction writer says, "everything else is done only occasionally and under protest. "Me and my typewriter, that's all there is in the world," he said the other day, sitting across from his wife, Janet, in the couple's apartment overlooking a foggy Manhattan. Asimov, 68, was making the point that he writes only what he chooses to write, rather than working for others. This is why, after 360 books, including best sellers such as The Foundation Trilogy and Robots of Dawn, as well as his own Science Fiction magazine, he has not written for the movies - until now. With the release of Rene Laloux's animated film Light Years, which opened Friday at the Roxy Screening Rooms in Philadelphia, Asimov makes his debut as a screenwriter.
NEWS
July 28, 1986
For those who might have missed the humor of coincidence in the July 17 issue, Page One had the article concerning the start of the "second Scopes trial" in Tennessee. Page 2-E had Ann Landers quoting Karen Norton at Laubach Literacy Action, stating that Tennessee has the second-highest illiteracy rate (27.6 percent) in the nation. If, in fact, 27.6 percent of the population of Tennessee is illiterate, one must ponder how high the degree of intelligence of the rest of the state must be. I would guess not too high if they wish to ban works by authors such as Margaret Meade, Isaac Asimov and Hans Christian Andersen.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
Most science fiction fans would agree that the genre has not been particularly well served by films. The "Star Wars" trilogy probably represents the high point of cinematic sci-fi, but even it suffered from the limitations imposed by gravity, the conservation of matter and all the other laws of physics. The neat thing about science fiction is that, with a stroke of the imagination, it can throw all those laws out the window. So can animation, which is why it would seem an even better medium for sci- fi than for the anthropomorphic ducks and rabbits with which it's traditionally been associated.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Paul Kurtz, 86, a philosopher whose advocacy of reason ahead of faith helped define contemporary secular humanism, died Saturday at home in Amherst, N.Y., of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mr. Kurtz taught philosophy at the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York, from 1965 until his retirement in 1991. But his wider influence came as founder in 1969 of Prometheus Books, a publisher of books and magazines devoted to fact-based, rather than faith-based, solutions to human problems.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
As befits the prolific Isaac Asimov's first venture in screenwriting, Light Years is several light-years removed from what we have come to expect from science fiction movies. And what we have come to expect is a matter of simple economics: The cost of live-action science fiction with its imagined worlds and technologies is staggering. As a result, when studios are willing to commit to a project, they insist that it have a broad appeal - especially to kids. With a few honorable exceptions - such as Outland and 2010 from Peter Hyams - this means that the field has been dominated by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, and their legion of lesser imitators.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Peter James Spielmann, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - Killer robots that can attack targets without any human input "should not have the power of life and death over human beings," a new draft U.N. report says. The report for the U.N. Human Rights Commission posted online this week deals with legal and philosophical issues involved in giving robots lethal powers over humans, echoing countless science-fiction novels and films. The debate dates to author Isaac Asimov's first rule for robots in the 1942 story "Runaround.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Based on the title of an Isaac Asimov short-story collection, I, Robot is a sleek machine built of parts culled from Minority Report and Blade Runner, customized to the specs of wiseacre star Will Smith. For its first two acts this flashy vehicle is an anodized titanium streamline baby. Then comes a robot rumble that brings the action to a crashing halt. As directed by Alex Proyas (The Crow, Dark City), I, Robot is less compelling as a drama of the human enslavement of androids than it is an intriguing vision of a treeless, cashless future where the personal robot is a household appliance as ubiquitous as the personal computer is today.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
How tempting, the idea of traveling to the past to correct a mistake or take advantage of a lost opportunity. What an enticement, the notion of traveling forward in time to see what the future holds. And how much fun, to hear all about it in an audio anthology produced by Dercum Audio. The imaginatively named Here Today . . . Gone to Tomorrow (six hours, $19.95) is a seven-story collection selected by science-fiction writer extraordinaire Isaac Asimov - and from his personal library, no less.
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NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Peter James Spielmann, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - Killer robots that can attack targets without any human input "should not have the power of life and death over human beings," a new draft U.N. report says. The report for the U.N. Human Rights Commission posted online this week deals with legal and philosophical issues involved in giving robots lethal powers over humans, echoing countless science-fiction novels and films. The debate dates to author Isaac Asimov's first rule for robots in the 1942 story "Runaround.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Paul Kurtz, 86, a philosopher whose advocacy of reason ahead of faith helped define contemporary secular humanism, died Saturday at home in Amherst, N.Y., of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mr. Kurtz taught philosophy at the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York, from 1965 until his retirement in 1991. But his wider influence came as founder in 1969 of Prometheus Books, a publisher of books and magazines devoted to fact-based, rather than faith-based, solutions to human problems.
NEWS
July 19, 2004 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Will Smith just loves the summertime. The Philly actor's new summer sizzler - the futuristic thriller I, Robot - is his latest No. 1 July debut, opening with a better-than-expected $52.25 million and bumping the vaunted Spider-Man 2 from the top spot at the weekend box office, according to studio estimates. If the numbers hold when final figures are released today, I, Robot would be Smith's best debut ever, coming in just ahead of Independence Day, Men in Black and Men in Black II, all July premieres that opened between $50 million and $52 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Based on the title of an Isaac Asimov short-story collection, I, Robot is a sleek machine built of parts culled from Minority Report and Blade Runner, customized to the specs of wiseacre star Will Smith. For its first two acts this flashy vehicle is an anodized titanium streamline baby. Then comes a robot rumble that brings the action to a crashing halt. As directed by Alex Proyas (The Crow, Dark City), I, Robot is less compelling as a drama of the human enslavement of androids than it is an intriguing vision of a treeless, cashless future where the personal robot is a household appliance as ubiquitous as the personal computer is today.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | by Andrew Kirtzman, New York Daily News
Isaac Asimov, the beloved, mutton-chopped author who helped pioneer modern science-fiction writing, died yesterday at age 72. Asimov died at 2:20 a.m. at New York University Hospital of heart and kidney failure, said his brother, Stanley. Asimov told a New York gathering of writers and artists in January that his recent bout with prostate problems made him wish for death. But the comment seemed at odds with his enormous thirst for life, typified by his unprecedented output of books and articles that landed him in the Guinness Book of World Records as the American author with the most titles to his name.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the death of Isaac Asimov yesterday at the age of 72, the world lost one of its greatest explainers. During a writing career that lasted 54 years, Asimov churned out 467 books, thousands of magazine articles and tens of millions of words on nonfiction subjects ranging from nuclear physics to the Bible. He was also one of the finest science fiction writers of modern times, winning the prestigious Hugo award - the equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize for science fiction - for three of his early novels, known as the Foundation trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
How tempting, the idea of traveling to the past to correct a mistake or take advantage of a lost opportunity. What an enticement, the notion of traveling forward in time to see what the future holds. And how much fun, to hear all about it in an audio anthology produced by Dercum Audio. The imaginatively named Here Today . . . Gone to Tomorrow (six hours, $19.95) is a seven-story collection selected by science-fiction writer extraordinaire Isaac Asimov - and from his personal library, no less.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1988 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A comedic look at the Vietnam War starring Robin Williams, an animated fantasy written by Isaac Asimov and a poignant study of a French saint by director Alain Cavalier are among this week's new arrivals at your video store. THERESE (1987) (Tamarelle) $59.95. 90 minutes. Catherine Mouchet, Aurore Prieto, Sylvie Habault. Alain Cavalier's elliptical chronicle of Therese of Lisieux, the girl saint of France, is, like her, a joy pure and simple. It conveys the piety of the young Carmelite nun without being pious and recognizes Jesus' spirit as a benevolent, almost puckish, force.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
As befits the prolific Isaac Asimov's first venture in screenwriting, Light Years is several light-years removed from what we have come to expect from science fiction movies. And what we have come to expect is a matter of simple economics: The cost of live-action science fiction with its imagined worlds and technologies is staggering. As a result, when studios are willing to commit to a project, they insist that it have a broad appeal - especially to kids. With a few honorable exceptions - such as Outland and 2010 from Peter Hyams - this means that the field has been dominated by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, and their legion of lesser imitators.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
Most science fiction fans would agree that the genre has not been particularly well served by films. The "Star Wars" trilogy probably represents the high point of cinematic sci-fi, but even it suffered from the limitations imposed by gravity, the conservation of matter and all the other laws of physics. The neat thing about science fiction is that, with a stroke of the imagination, it can throw all those laws out the window. So can animation, which is why it would seem an even better medium for sci- fi than for the anthropomorphic ducks and rabbits with which it's traditionally been associated.
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