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Islamabad

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NEWS
May 29, 1998 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, the Pakistanis really had no choice: Either they detonated their nuclear devices, or they acknowledged India's current and future dominance. India's powerful interior minister, L.K. Advani, said as much after India set off five nuclear bombs two weeks ago. Pakistan, he said, "should realize the change in the geostrategic situation in the region . . . and roll back its anti-India policies. " Given the bitter history between the two - which includes three wars since 1947 - no government in Islamabad could politically afford to remain non-nuclear.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Alex Rodriguez, Tribune Washington Bureau
KABUL, Afghanistan - Expressing public and private frustration with Pakistan, the Obama administration has unleashed the CIA to resume an aggressive campaign of drone strikes in Pakistani territory over the last few weeks, approving strikes that might have been vetoed in the past for fear of angering Islamabad. Now, said a senior U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity in discussing sensitive issues, the administration's attitude is, "What do we have to lose?" Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta made clear the deteriorating relations with Islamabad on Thursday, saying the United States is "reaching the limits of our patience" because Pakistan has not cracked down on local insurgents who attack U.S. troops and others in neighboring Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Still seeking to prevent Pakistan from testing nuclear weapons, the Clinton administration signaled yesterday that taking the "high moral ground" could reap Islamabad significant U.S. military assistance. While the White House has made no firm offers, high-ranking officials said key members of Congress were warming to the notion that a "courageous" decision to refrain from testing would deserve some type of reward. "If we're in a world where Pakistan doesn't test, then a lot of options open up," said national security adviser Samuel R. Berger.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - NATO on Tuesday invited Pakistan's president to next week's Chicago summit on Afghanistan, the strongest sign yet that Islamabad is ready to reopen its western border to U.S. and NATO military supplies heading to the war in the neighboring country. Pakistan blocked the routes in November after U.S. air strikes killed 24 of its troops on the Afghan border. The attack sent ties between Washington and Islamabad to new lows, threatening regional cooperation needed for negotiating an end to the Afghan war. The developments signal something of a rapprochement, but tensions are likely to bedevil what has long been a brittle relationship, scarred by mistrust on both sides.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Zarar Khan, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Emergency workers with flashlights searched the smoldering wreckage of a passenger jet carrying 127 people that crashed into a muddy wheat field Friday while trying to land in a violent thunderstorm at Islamabad's main airport. The government said there appeared to be no survivors in the crash of the Boeing 737-200 near Benazir Bhutto International Airport - the second major air disaster in the Pakistani capital in less than two years. Sobbing relatives of those aboard the Bhoja Air flight from Karachi to Islamabad rushed to airports in both cities for news of their loved ones.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Sebastian Abbot and Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan has increased efforts to reach out to some of its biggest enemies in Afghanistan, a significant policy shift that could prove crucial to U.S.-backed efforts to strike a peace deal in the neighboring country. The target of the diplomatic push has mainly been non-Pashtun political leaders who have been at odds with Pakistan for years because of the country's historical support for the Afghan Taliban, a Pashtun movement. Many of the leaders fought against the Taliban when the fundamentalist Islamic group seized control of Afghanistan in the 1990s with Pakistan's help, and have accused Islamabad of maintaining support for the insurgents after the U.S.-led invasion in 2001 - allegations denied by the government.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD - Pakistani lawmakers took aim Tuesday at one of the most potent U.S. weapons against militants, recommending that a cessation of drone missile strikes in their country's volatile tribal areas be part of a blueprint to end a four-month freeze in relations between Washington and Islamabad. So far, however, Pakistani officials have yet to explain what they'd do if the United States ignored the demand. In the past, Islamabad has publicly condemned U.S. drone strikes but tacitly allowed them to take place.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD - In a rare move, a Pakistani judge granted bail Friday to a young, mentally challenged Christian girl accused of insulting Islam by burning pages of the religion's holy book. Activists who had pressed for the girl's release welcomed the rare decision to grant bail in a blasphemy case. But defense lawyers expressed concern for her safety in a conservative country where blasphemy allegations often result in vigilante justice. The girl's plight has drawn new attention to Pakistan's harsh blasphemy laws, which critics claim are used to persecute minorities and settle personal vendettas.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Abdul Sattar, Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan - Assailants torched more than 20 tankers in Pakistan carrying fuel for U.S. and NATO troops in neighboring Afghanistan on Thursday, in the first reported attack since Islamabad closed the border to protest coalition air strikes that killed 24 Pakistani troops last month. Several hundred trucks have been stranded at poorly guarded terminals around the country as they wait for Pakistan to reopen its two border crossings into Afghanistan. About 40 percent of the nonlethal supplies for U.S.-led troops in landlocked Afghanistan travel across Pakistani soil.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Ishtiaq Mahsud, Associated Press
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan - U.S. missiles fired from a drone in a Pakistani tribal region near the Afghan border killed eight suspected militants early Sunday, officials said, as the controversial American strikes continue despite Islamabad's persistent demands that they stop. The latest attack killed fighters loyal to militant commander Hafiz Gul Bahadur, the officials said. Bahadur is believed by residents of the region to have an informal working relationship with the Pakistani army, refraining from targeting the security forces while focusing on U.S. and NATO forces in nearby Afghanistan.
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NEWS
July 26, 2013
Tunisian killing ignites protests TUNIS, Tunisia - Angry antigovernment demonstrations broke out Thursday across Tunisia after gunmen killed the leader of a leftist opposition party, raising fears of new chaos on the difficult road to democracy in the cradle of the Arab Spring. Just five months after a similar assassination plunged the country into crisis, two gunmen shot Mohammed Brahmi, leader of the Popular Current party, in his car outside his home. Tunisia is struggling after overthrowing dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Pakistan's former military ruler and president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, flew home last week from four years of self-imposed exile, a physician-turned-entrepreneur from Villanova was by his side. Raza Bokhari, a 1991 immigrant from Pakistan who became a highly successful businessman and civic activist, describes himself as "a long-term friend of Musharraf's and his current point of contact in the U.S.A. " In a phone interview from Islamabad, Bokhari said Musharraf returned to participate in Pakistan's coming May elections - despite death threats, huge legal challenges, and an uncertain political future.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Sebastian Abbot, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan's leaders received a powerful one-two punch Tuesday as the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the prime minister in a corruption case and a firebrand cleric led thousands of protesters in a second day of antigovernment demonstrations in the capital. The events set the stage for renewed political crisis in Pakistan, a U.S. ally in the fight against Islamic extremists. They sparked accusations that Pakistan's top judge and powerful generals were working to destabilize the government ahead of parliamentary elections expected in the spring, and possibly delay the vote.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Sebastian Abbot and Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan has increased efforts to reach out to some of its biggest enemies in Afghanistan, a significant policy shift that could prove crucial to U.S.-backed efforts to strike a peace deal in the neighboring country. The target of the diplomatic push has mainly been non-Pashtun political leaders who have been at odds with Pakistan for years because of the country's historical support for the Afghan Taliban, a Pashtun movement. Many of the leaders fought against the Taliban when the fundamentalist Islamic group seized control of Afghanistan in the 1990s with Pakistan's help, and have accused Islamabad of maintaining support for the insurgents after the U.S.-led invasion in 2001 - allegations denied by the government.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Pakistanis have united in outrage over the Taliban's attack on 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai, who campaigned for girls' education and became a prominent symbol of defiance against Islamist rule. Gunmen boarded a school bus, asked for Malala by name, and shot her in the head (as I write this, she is in critical condition). A Pakistani Taliban spokesman defended the attack, justifying it because Malala was promoting "enlightened moderation. " He said they would attack her again if she recovered.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Augustine Anthony and Haris Anwar, Bloomberg News
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistan deployed its army to protect diplomatic missions in Islamabad on Thursday amid some of the most sustained and violent protests yet against an American-made film that denigrates Muhammad. "We have to do everything we can to protect foreigners in the country," Information Minister Qamar Zaman Kaira told the GEO television channel, criticizing violence he said was an attempt to sabotage the government's call for peaceful rallies Thursday. "Is this the way to show respect to our Prophet?"
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Rebecca Santana, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD - In a rare move, a Pakistani judge granted bail Friday to a young, mentally challenged Christian girl accused of insulting Islam by burning pages of the religion's holy book. Activists who had pressed for the girl's release welcomed the rare decision to grant bail in a blasphemy case. But defense lawyers expressed concern for her safety in a conservative country where blasphemy allegations often result in vigilante justice. The girl's plight has drawn new attention to Pakistan's harsh blasphemy laws, which critics claim are used to persecute minorities and settle personal vendettas.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Ishtiaq Mahsud, Associated Press
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan - U.S. missiles fired from a drone in a Pakistani tribal region near the Afghan border killed eight suspected militants early Sunday, officials said, as the controversial American strikes continue despite Islamabad's persistent demands that they stop. The latest attack killed fighters loyal to militant commander Hafiz Gul Bahadur, the officials said. Bahadur is believed by residents of the region to have an informal working relationship with the Pakistani army, refraining from targeting the security forces while focusing on U.S. and NATO forces in nearby Afghanistan.
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