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Islamic Law

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NEWS
November 27, 1999 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the constellation of Islamic states - Iran, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan - a new star is rising: Zamfara. Last month, the governor of this rural farming region, on the fault line dividing Africa's Islamic north from its Christian south, stunned the nation by proclaiming that his state, one of 36 in Nigeria, would now be ruled by the Koran instead of the national constitution. In adherence to strict Islamic law, or sharia, alcohol sales and gambling ceased. Patrons disappeared from Gusau's theater after women were segregated into a separate section.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Atiq Chaudhry did not know that he was creating the ultimate Philly fusion cuisine. He just thought that he was reacting like a good businessman. A few years ago, Chaudhry noticed that more and more of the customers at his Pizza Pak II hoagie shop were Muslim, and that more and more were requesting halal meat - meat slaughtered according to Islamic law. That is when Chaudhry, a Pakistani immigrant, came up with the idea of combining a local food favorite with a centuries-old Islamic tradition.
NEWS
July 4, 1995 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A court decision ordering a professor to divorce his wife - because his writings are considered anti-Islamic - has unleashed a storm of debate over the very nature of Egyptian law. The Egyptian government has put off enforcing the ruling, which found that Cairo University Professor Nasser Hamid Abu Zeid was an apostate and thus banned under Islamic law from remaining married to his Muslim wife. Abu Zeid and his wife, Ibtihal Younes, a lecturer in French literature at the university, have vowed to stay together, even though, as an adultress, she could technically face death by stoning under Islamic law. They remain holed up in their apartment outside the capital, waiting to see whether the June 14 ruling will hold up on further judicial review.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Maggie Michael and Lee Keath, Associated Press
CAIRO - Protesters flooded Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday in the second giant rally this week, angrily vowing to bring down a draft constitution approved by allies of President Mohammed Morsi, as Egypt appeared headed toward a volatile confrontation between the opposition and ruling Islamists. The protests have highlighted an increasingly cohesive opposition leadership of prominent liberal and secular politicians trying to direct public anger against Morsi and the Islamists - a contrast to the leaderless youth uprising last year that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a small industrial space in Upper Darby, Sultan Bhuiyan watches as one of his workers slides a live chicken upside down into a metal bracket. With only the chicken's head exposed, the man quietly utters the phrase "in the name of God," and following the ritual of Islamic law, brandishes a knife, running it quickly across the chicken's neck. He will do this over and over, tenderly stroking the chicken's feathers as he takes it from its cage to the bloodstained killing room.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After his latest business venture, the Alexander Diner in Washington Township, failed in 1997, Mohammed Ahamed found it hard to summon the courage for another undertaking. But his wife, Shirin, his behind-the-scenes muse, kept saying out loud what he knew in his heart: that this time, it would be different, that it would be more than a source of income. The Ahameds - immigrants from the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh - are opening a meat market and Asian grocery store on Gibbsboro Road in Lindenwold.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | ,By Maggie Michael and Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
CAIRO - Anticipating a strong presence in the new Egyptian parliament, ultraconservative Islamists outlined plans Friday for a strict brand of religious law, which could limit personal freedoms and steer a key U.S. ally toward becoming an Islamic state. Egypt's election commission announced a trickle of results from the first round of parliamentary elections and said 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the highest turnout in modern history. But leaked counts point to a clear majority for Islamist parties at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against Hosni Mubarak, toppling a regime long seen as a secular bulwark in the Middle East.
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
The conviction yesterday of Joseph L. Young for the grisly murders of Dr. Isma'il Raji al-Faruqi and his wife, Lois, brought little solace to the former friends and colleagues of the slain couple. Nor did it allay uneasy feelings that, perhaps, there is more to the crime than the irrational act of one man. "It's just difficult to accept that this man on his own volition took it upon himself to kill two people of such prominence," said Latib Abdulrehman, who had been a student and a close friend of Faruqi, an Islamic scholar.
NEWS
August 2, 2005 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Drafters of the new Iraqi constitution have just two weeks left to resolve a host of deeply divisive issues, including the role of Islam in national affairs, the place of women in Iraqi society, and what sort of autonomy should be granted different parts of the country under a federated structure of government. Yesterday, the drafting committee passed up a final chance to request a delay, pledging to work "day and night" to finish by the Aug. 15 deadline. Sheikh Homam Hamoodi, chairman of the drafting committee, said the 30-day extension that several members proposed Sunday was "unanimously rejected.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | By ROGER P. WINTER
They look like stick-figure drawings as they trek out of the desolate rural areas of southern Sudan into rapidly swelling towns such as Kapoeta. They come in search of food, but little or no food is to be found. When I visited Kapoeta and other towns in the Sudan's rebel-controlled south this summer, I thought the situation couldn't get worse. But the war has escalated since then, famine has worsened and more and more people have died in both government and rebel-held areas. While locusts, floods and drought grind away at the ecology of the Sudan, this famine's most devastating cause has been the apparent willingness of the Khartoum government to see the south depopulated because its the area where the rebel Sudanese People's Liberation Army (SPLA)
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NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calls from some legislators to ban American Muslims from following Islamic law are born of a "bogeyman fear" that Muslims will try to impose their way of life on others of different faiths, an imam and author of books on Islam said Sunday at Congregation Beth El in Voorhees. "It's illogical. It's a fear tactic. It's stupid," Imam Sohaib Sultan told more than 100 people who attended "Islamic Sharia Law: Myths and Facts," an interfaith event hosted by Jewish Catholic Muslim Dialogue of Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a Rutgers University professor win over voters in his homeland and be elected the next president of Iran? Hooshang Amirahmadi, of Rutgers' Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy in New Brunswick, says his candidacy is a serious attempt to build bridges between the Islamic republic and the United States, where he has spent four decades. But experts call him a long shot at best. "Who can they find better than me as a peacemaker - someone who understands American language, Iranian language, American culture, Iranian culture, and can go back and forth?"
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Maggie Michael and Lee Keath, Associated Press
CAIRO - Protesters flooded Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday in the second giant rally this week, angrily vowing to bring down a draft constitution approved by allies of President Mohammed Morsi, as Egypt appeared headed toward a volatile confrontation between the opposition and ruling Islamists. The protests have highlighted an increasingly cohesive opposition leadership of prominent liberal and secular politicians trying to direct public anger against Morsi and the Islamists - a contrast to the leaderless youth uprising last year that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAIRO - The thousands of ultraconservative Muslims who poured into Tahrir Square on Friday were destined for disappointment. Dressed in the long traditional shirt-like gelabiya, some accompanied by wives shrouded in black except for their eyes, these men were demanding that Egypt's new constitution be based on the rulings of Islamic law, or sharia , including the criminal provisions that the hand of a thief be cut off or a woman be stoned to...
NEWS
March 18, 2012
Jonathan Turley is a professor of public interest law at George Washington University The recent exchange between an atheist and a judge in a small courtroom in rural Pennsylvania could have come out of a Dickens novel. Magisterial District Judge Mark Martin was hearing a case in which an irate Muslim stood accused of attacking an atheist, Ernest Perce, because he was wearing a "Zombie Muhammad" costume on Halloween. Although the judge had "no doubt that the incident occurred," he dismissed the charge of criminal harassment against the Muslim and proceeded to browbeat Perce.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Heidi Vogt, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai endorsed a "code of conduct" Tuesday issued by an influential council of clerics that activists say marks a giant step backward for women's rights in the country. Karzai's remarks backing the Ulema Council's document, which allows husbands to beat wives under certain circumstances and encourages segregation of the sexes, is seen as part of his outreach to insurgents like the Taliban. Both the United States and Karzai hope the Taliban can be brought into negotiations to end Afghanistan's decade-long war. But activists express worry that gains made by women since 2001 may be lost in the process.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
Jonathan Turley is a professor of public interest law at George Washington University Last week in Washington, the United States hosted an international conference obliquely titled "Expert Meeting on Implementing the U.N. Human Rights Resolution 16/18. " The impenetrable title conceals the disturbing agenda: to establish international standards for, among other things, criminalizing "intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of . . . religion and belief. " The unstated enemy of religion in this conference is free speech, and the Obama administration is facilitating efforts by Muslim countries to "deter" some speech in the name of human rights.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | ,By Maggie Michael and Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
CAIRO - Anticipating a strong presence in the new Egyptian parliament, ultraconservative Islamists outlined plans Friday for a strict brand of religious law, which could limit personal freedoms and steer a key U.S. ally toward becoming an Islamic state. Egypt's election commission announced a trickle of results from the first round of parliamentary elections and said 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the highest turnout in modern history. But leaked counts point to a clear majority for Islamist parties at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against Hosni Mubarak, toppling a regime long seen as a secular bulwark in the Middle East.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Aya Batrawy, ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO - Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, emerging as the biggest winner in the first round of parliamentary elections, sought Saturday to reassure Egyptians that it would not sacrifice personal freedoms in promoting Islamic law. The deputy head of the Brotherhood's new political party, Essam el-Erian, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview that the group is not interested in imposing Islamic values on Egypt, home to a sizable Christian minority...
NEWS
December 3, 2011 | By Maggie Michael and Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
CAIRO - Anticipating a strong presence in the new Egyptian parliament, ultraconservative Islamists outlined plans Friday for a strict brand of religious law, a move that could limit personal freedoms and steer a key U.S. ally toward an Islamic state. Egypt's election commission announced only a trickle of results from the first round of parliamentary elections and said 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the highest turnout in modern history. But leaked counts point to a clear majority for Islamist parties at the expense of liberal activist groups that led the uprising against Hosni Mubarak, toppling a regime long seen as a secular bulwark in the Middle East.
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