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Islamic Leaders

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NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
When the United States launched its attack on Iraq last week, a Philadelphia Islamic leader who was in Saudi Arabia said there was a sense of relief combined with exuberance among the Saudi people. "The mood was happy," said the Imam Muhammad Abdulaleem, "because (the attack) was long overdue. " Abdulaleem, imam of the Masjidullah Mosque on Ogontz Avenue near 77th Avenue, was one of 20 Islamic leaders from the United States who had been invited to Saudi Arabia for a briefing from religious and civic leaders there.
NEWS
February 27, 2002
Paul Gigot: Islam is not a violent religion, but Islam does have a problem, which is that elements of it are at war with modernity. I mean, they have not accepted things like self-determination, personal freedom. Mara Liasson: And tolerance. Gigot: Or tolerance or, for example, the liberation of women. . . . And that creates some of this hostility which we see in the terrorism. Tony Snow: . . . What's going on now [is] a battle for the soul of Islam, in many senses.. . . This was a religion that, in its early centuries, was a conquering and civilizing force.
NEWS
August 30, 1994
The way Roman Catholic and Islamic leaders are reacting to the upcoming International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, you'd think it was a coven of Satan's minions sent to destroy the world. Sorry about the Crusades and the counter-Crusades, mate, but evil bureaucrats are afoot. The conference is focusing on ways to limit global population growth - a goal that seems all the more pressing as disasters devastate countries that do not control their reproduction rate.
NEWS
September 25, 2001
This was found on the Internet, and has been making the rounds of e-mail. The author is unknown, although the piece first appeared on the Web site adelaide.indy-media.org. BOMB THEM with butter, bribe them with hope. A military response, particularly an attack on Afghanistan, is exactly what the terrorists want. It will strengthen their fanatical ranks. Instead, bomb Afghanistan with butter, with rice, bread, clothing and medicine. It will cost less than conventional arms, poses no threat of U.S. casualties and just might get the populace thinking that maybe the Taliban don't have the answers.
NEWS
July 10, 2003
The Sister Clara Muhammad School is one of the oldest and respected Islamic schools in the Philadelphia and Delaware Valley area. Imam Shamsud-din Ali is one of our oldest and respected Islamic leaders in the City of Philadelphia. He has been aiding and promoting Islam for well over 36 years. The Sister Clara Muhammad School has weathered many adversities, hardships and outright opposition to its growth and development over the years of its existence and by the grace and mercy of Allah and the help of many people, Muslims and non Muslims alike, it still exists and survives.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Friends of slain Islamic scholars Isma'il Raji Faruqi and his wife, Lois, are offering a $50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the Faruqis' killer. Isma'il Faruqi, 65, and Lois Faruqi, 60 - who also was called Lamya - were stabbed to death in their home in Cheltenham Township about 2:30 a.m. May 27 by an intruder wielding a 15-inch survival knife. The couple's daughter Anmar Zein, 27, was stabbed six times in the arms and chest but survived.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Majority rule isn't always best A letter Tuesday ("Republicans are the ones listening") suggests that members of Congress shouldn't have voted for the health-care law because polls showed that 60 percent of the people were opposed to it. But majorities are often wrong, as most people don't have a full understanding of the problems we face as a society, nor do they fully understand the solutions. Our elected officials are not in government simply to fulfill the wishes of their constituents.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Today, the start of Ramadan, Muslim students throughout the Philadelphia school district will gather in unused classrooms, their school's library, or even the cafeteria to mark Islam's holy month of fasting. Every day, in growing numbers, male Muslim students are visible in the halls and classrooms with head coverings called kufis. Female Muslims wear long scarves known as khimars, some revealing only their eyes. Each Friday, hundreds of Muslim students leave school early and head for local mosques for the jum'ah, Islam's most significant weekly prayer.
NEWS
October 8, 2001
Until yesterday, the United States had waged its war against terrorism through diplomatic words, judicial warrants and judicious use of its wallet. Yesterday, it added thunder. American forces, assisted directly by the British and indirectly by other allies, launched strikes at Taliban and terrorist targets inside Afghanistan. The usual fog of war and necessary shroud of secrecy prevented ordinary U.S. civilians from knowing yesterday whether the attacks were well-aimed or successful.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Joseph P. Blake, Daily News Staff Writer
The Imam Muhammad Abdulaleem describes himself as "a common man," who rides public transportation and worries about SEPTA fare increases just like everyone else. Recently, though, his life went through some uncommon changes making him anything but "a common man. " Abdulaleem, 37, lives in Mt. Airy and is the imam of the Masjiullah (Mosque of Allah) in West Oak Lane. He was one of 400 Islamic Ulemas, or intellectuals; spiritual leaders, scholars, and community leaders chosen to attend an historic conference this month sponsored by the Saudi Arabian government and the Muslim World League to address the crisis in the Persian Gulf.
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NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a Rutgers University professor win over voters in his homeland and be elected the next president of Iran? Hooshang Amirahmadi, of Rutgers' Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy in New Brunswick, says his candidacy is a serious attempt to build bridges between the Islamic republic and the United States, where he has spent four decades. But experts call him a long shot at best. "Who can they find better than me as a peacemaker - someone who understands American language, Iranian language, American culture, Iranian culture, and can go back and forth?"
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Majority rule isn't always best A letter Tuesday ("Republicans are the ones listening") suggests that members of Congress shouldn't have voted for the health-care law because polls showed that 60 percent of the people were opposed to it. But majorities are often wrong, as most people don't have a full understanding of the problems we face as a society, nor do they fully understand the solutions. Our elected officials are not in government simply to fulfill the wishes of their constituents.
NEWS
September 7, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
HE WAS A 25-year-old South Asian Muslim working in a pharmacy in the Philadelphia suburbs with vivid memories of getting pushed around and even bullied in high school after the 9/11 attacks - but he thought that era was all in the past. That thought changed one afternoon in summer 2009, when he was working a long line at the pharmacy counter and two middle-aged white women accused him of being too slow - then told his manager to "watch this kid, otherwise he's going to blow up the store.
NEWS
March 6, 2007 | By Arthur J. Magida
When Louis Farrakhan goes, there'll be no second act, no third act, no encore. This curtain will stay down forever: Farrakhan is an original, a one-of-a-kind. And for America's sake, I pray we see no more like him. In a Feb. 25 address in Detroit that was widely billed as a "farewell," Farrakhan recently said his "time is up. " His retreat from public life is medical and terminal: Fighting cancer since the early 1990s, he knows his end is near, an end that will come as a relief to many of us. He dispensed hate and vengeance, subscribing to the worst stereotypes of his "enemies" with a broad, undiscriminating gullibility that helped no one, surely not the African Americans he had sworn to uplift.
NEWS
September 29, 2006
WHY DOES Flavia Colgan (op-ed, Sept. 27, "Will Islam rise to pope's challenge?") claim that her perceived challenge from the Holy Father is unmet? Islamic leaders routinely counsel against violence and engage in a rationalist discourse with other faiths. Perhaps it is the media that chooses to ignore these entreaties, just as the media chose to ignore the context of the pope's words. As a non-Muslim expatriate living in the United Arab Emirates during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, I have been generously given numerous tracts on Islam and Muslim-Christian dialogue and politely engaged in very interesting conversations on these matters.
NEWS
January 20, 2006 | By Jim Geraghty
Life in the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan in recent weeks demonstrated the two steps forward, one step back nature of the war on terrorism. Those who don't want to die at the hands of an Islamist suicide bomber can see progress on some fronts, a few setbacks on others, and hopefully, a steady sense of incremental gains. Amman, like many cities in the Arab world, was quiet last week, as roughly 2.5 million Muslims traveled to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, for the hajj, an annual religious pilgrimage.
NEWS
July 19, 2005
Part of the eerie silence after Sept. 11, 2001, came from the lack of Muslim religious and cultural leaders strongly condemning the suicide bombers. Those who were mute deserved the criticism sent their way. So it is especially important to note that since the July 7 bombings of three London subway trains and one bus, many Islamic leaders have found a strong and clear voice to decry the violence and those who teach a twisted version of the Koran. Over the weekend, Britain's influential Sunni Council issued a fatwa, or religious edict, describing the London suicide bombings as the manifestation of a "perverted ideology.
NEWS
January 30, 2004 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Six of Iraq's secular political parties met yesterday to cement a new alliance aimed at preventing a religious government from coming to power in Iraq, as it did in neighboring Iran. So far, the Iraqis who have turned out by the thousands to demand a general election carry placards of their favorite clerics and posters with religious slogans. The religious fervor surrounding Iraq's political future has disheartened secular politicians, who fear that the clerics' growing influence will usher in an Islamic agenda, leave them powerless, and dash hopes of making Iraq a model for Middle Eastern democracy.
NEWS
December 26, 2003 | By Cliff Churgin INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Two attacks yesterday shattered two months of relative peace in the Middle East, as a Palestinian suicide bomber killed himself and four other people at a bus stop outside Tel Aviv just minutes after an Israeli helicopter killed a senior Islamic Jihad official and four other people in the Gaza Strip. The attacks could lead to a wave of retaliatory violence and damage new efforts to restart the Israel-Palestinian peace process. Palestinian officials and Egyptian mediators have been struggling to persuade Palestinian groups to halt attacks and to get Israel to forgo such targeted killings of militant leaders.
NEWS
July 10, 2003
The Sister Clara Muhammad School is one of the oldest and respected Islamic schools in the Philadelphia and Delaware Valley area. Imam Shamsud-din Ali is one of our oldest and respected Islamic leaders in the City of Philadelphia. He has been aiding and promoting Islam for well over 36 years. The Sister Clara Muhammad School has weathered many adversities, hardships and outright opposition to its growth and development over the years of its existence and by the grace and mercy of Allah and the help of many people, Muslims and non Muslims alike, it still exists and survives.
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