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Islamic Republic

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June 21, 1998 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Was this what the Ayatollah Khomeini had in mind? Iran's soccer team at the World Cup, staying in a chateau that serves as a school for pastry chefs, with a coach from California whose wife runs Beau Visage, a skin-care business/vegetarian restaurant in Palo Alto, Calif.? Iran will play the United States today in Lyon in a match whose political contrasts seem almost too easy. But while at least one of Iran's players acknowledges that "it is imperative we win against the U.S.A.," nobody in camp has called the opponent the "Great Satan.
NEWS
September 12, 2003 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yesterday, as the nation commemorated the second anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, another group of survivors and their families were celebrating a victory in the first terrorist attack against the United States 20 years ago. A federal judge in Washington ruled on Tuesday that the Islamic Republic of Iran financed and carried out the April 18, 1983, car bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, and awarded a first group...
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | BY HABIB K. ABD AL-HAQQ
Uncle Sam seems to fear the Islamic Republic of Iran because the revolution in Iran could becoming the catalyst for the resurgence and re-establishment of the Islamic Empire. Iran is the only nation among those with a Muslim majority to declare itself an Islamic Republic. Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco, Kuwait, Egypt, Iraq etc., all rule their subjects with an eclectic smorgasbord approach. They might use a little socialism, mixed with a smattering of monarchy, a pinch of democracy and an occasional dash of Islam to keep them in power.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A new Israeli government report published in local media on Thursday concludes that international sanctions are hitting Iran hard and called for another round, adding a new wrinkle to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's claim that tougher action is needed to prevent the Islamic Republic from developing nuclear weapons. The Foreign Ministry report - which surfaced on the same day Netanyahu made his case before the U.N. General Assembly - adds to the cacophony of voices coming out of Israel over the showdown with Iran.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hana Saeidi, the bright young niece of Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, climbs into the taxi that her uncle is driving on the streets of Tehran. She is holding a camera, excited about her first film class in school. Her teacher has provided a list of rules to make a "distributable" movie. Among the key rules: "No sordid realism. " In the small and brilliant Jafar Panahi's Taxi , the internationally renowned director has been reduced to making his own brand of "sordid realism" on the sly - that is, realism free of the restrictions of Sharia law. With a small camera mounted on the dashboard of a car, Panahi drives along, picking up passengers and recording them as they debate politics and religion, crime and punishment, Woody Allen and Akira Kurosawa.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's supreme leader ordered the creation of an Internet oversight agency that includes top military, security, and political figures in the country's boldest attempt yet to control the Web. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Wednesday that the Supreme Council of Cyberspace would be tasked with preventing harm to Iranians who go online, state TV reported. The report did not specify the kinds of dangers the council would tackle. But officials have in the past described two separate threats: computer viruses created by Iran's rivals aimed at sabotaging its industry, particularly its nuclear program, and a "culture invasion" aimed at undermining the Islamic Republic.
NEWS
March 27, 2009 | By Trudy Rubin
If you want to know how President Obama is changing America's foreign-policy strategy, watch the short video in which he wishes Iran's people and leaders a happy Nowruz. Nowruz is the Persian new year, an ancient holiday celebrated on the first day of spring. The president's greeting (www.whitehouse.gov/nowruz), broadcast last Friday, shows how he intends to fulfill his pledge to reach out to Iran. Obama's Nowruz message was striking for what it included - and what it omitted.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Iran took steps yesterday to assure the United States that it was remaining neutral in the Persian Gulf war and that an estimated 90 Iraqi aircraft that have sought sanctuary on Iranian territory will be impounded until the end of the conflict. But an Iraqi transport plane that had taken refuge in Iran has returned to Iraq, congressional sources said. The sources, who spoke after receiving a military briefing, said they did not know whether the plane was military or civilian.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this city of ornately tiled mosques, where portraits of unsmiling ayatollahs grace palaces built by shahs, one of the biggest crowd-pleasers is the Shaking Minarets. Young men in leather jackets and open-necked shirts show off by climbing the steep circular staircases up the minarets. With a show of bravado, they poke their heads out the window and wave. Then they grab the walls and shake so hard that the minarets, thanks to the soft soil underneath the mosque, sway visibly.
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Jewish women in the back rows of the synagogue wear long garments in the traditional Iranian style, but instead of chadors, their heads are covered with cheerful, flowered scarves. The boys in their skullcaps, with Hebrew prayer books tucked under their arms, scamper down the aisles to grab the best spots near the lush, turquoise Persian carpet of the altar. This is Friday night, Shabbat - Iranian style, and the synagogue in an affluent neighborhood of North Tehran is filled to capacity with more than 400 worshipers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hana Saeidi, the bright young niece of Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, climbs into the taxi that her uncle is driving on the streets of Tehran. She is holding a camera, excited about her first film class in school. Her teacher has provided a list of rules to make a "distributable" movie. Among the key rules: "No sordid realism. " In the small and brilliant Jafar Panahi's Taxi , the internationally renowned director has been reduced to making his own brand of "sordid realism" on the sly - that is, realism free of the restrictions of Sharia law. With a small camera mounted on the dashboard of a car, Panahi drives along, picking up passengers and recording them as they debate politics and religion, crime and punishment, Woody Allen and Akira Kurosawa.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
Secretary of State John F. Kerry defended the international nuclear deal with Iran as a step toward a safer world Wednesday, as the Obama administration secured enough backing in the Senate to carry out the agreement. "History may judge it a turning point, a moment when the builders of stability seize the initiative from the destroyers of hope," Kerry told an invited crowd of about 200 at the National Constitution Center. Before Kerry spoke, Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D., Md.) announced her support for the accord.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
PHARRELL WILLIAMS ' "Happy" has become so popular, it's virtually impossible to go a day without seeing or hearing some new version of it on TV or YouTube. It's even made its way to Iran. And in Iran, that's not a good thing. An Internet video of six young Iranian men and women dancing to "Happy" has led to their arrests. Darn you, Western infidels. Criticism outside Iran was predictably swift yesterday, with calls for freedom for the jailed youths. Pharrell tweeted: "It's beyond sad these kids were arrested for trying to spread happiness.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
No big deal As I read about the failure of the baseball writers to elect anyone to the Hall of Fame this year, it occurs to me that the only people who really care about the use of performance-enhancing drugs are the media ("Bonds, Clemens should be in the Hall of Fame," Saturday). I have never spoken to a fan who thinks that this is a big deal. Athletes have been using some form of these drugs for as long as I can remember. Who cares? It's only a game to me, an entertainment form. Baseball writers should get off their moral high horse and do what they should be doing, recognizing extraordinary performance in the sport of baseball.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Daniel Estrin, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - A new Israeli government report published in local media on Thursday concludes that international sanctions are hitting Iran hard and called for another round, adding a new wrinkle to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's claim that tougher action is needed to prevent the Islamic Republic from developing nuclear weapons. The Foreign Ministry report - which surfaced on the same day Netanyahu made his case before the U.N. General Assembly - adds to the cacophony of voices coming out of Israel over the showdown with Iran.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
There are few foreign-policy positions more silly than the assertion, without context, that "deterrence works. " It is like saying air power works. It worked for Kosovo; it didn't work over North Vietnam. It's like saying city-bombing works. It worked in Japan. It didn't in London. The idea that some military technique "works" is meaningless. It depends on the time, circumstances, and adversaries. Yet a school of American "realists" remains absolutist on deterrence and is increasingly annoyed with those troublesome Israelis who are risking regional war by threatening a preemptive strike to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons.
NEWS
August 5, 2012
Iran claims test of new missile TEHRAN, Iran - Iran claimed Saturday it has successfully test-fired an upgraded version of a short-range ballistic missile with improved accuracy, increasing the Islamic Republic's capability to strike both land and naval targets. Defense Minister Gen. Ahmad Vahidi said the solid-fueled Fateh-110 has a range of 300 kilometers (185 miles). He said the weapon could strike with pinpoint precision, making it the most accurate weapon of its kind in Iran's arsenal.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to slap sanctions on Iran's energy, shipping and financial industries, convinced that increasing the economic pressure on Tehran will force it to abandon its suspected nuclear weapons program. By a vote of 421-6, the House backed the legislation that builds on the current penalties directed at financial institutions that do business with Iran's central bank. The Senate is expected to easily pass the measure and send it to President Obama for his signature.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Aron Heller and Veselin Toshkov, Associated Press
SOFIA, Bulgaria - Israel vowed Wednesday to strike back at Iran, blaming the Islamic Republic for a brazen daylight bombing that targeted a bus full of Israeli tourists in Bulgaria and killed at least seven people. President Obama termed it a "barbaric terrorist attack. " The U.S. leader called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to express his sorrow over the attack and pledged assistance to bring the perpetrators to justice, according to statements from the two leaders' offices.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's supreme leader ordered the creation of an Internet oversight agency that includes top military, security, and political figures in the country's boldest attempt yet to control the Web. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Wednesday that the Supreme Council of Cyberspace would be tasked with preventing harm to Iranians who go online, state TV reported. The report did not specify the kinds of dangers the council would tackle. But officials have in the past described two separate threats: computer viruses created by Iran's rivals aimed at sabotaging its industry, particularly its nuclear program, and a "culture invasion" aimed at undermining the Islamic Republic.
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