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Islamic Scholars

NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
A three-member panel of Montgomery County judges has denied a request for a new trial in the case of Joseph L. Young, who was convicted in the 1986 slayings of two Islamic scholars in their Cheltenham home. In a 100-page ruling released on Wednesday, the judges found that the weight of evidence supported a first-degree murder conviction, clearing the way for a formal sentencing to take place, according to Young's attorney, Stephen G. Heckman of Norristown. "It's a very comprehensive opinion, but I just feel there are certain issues that will have to be addressed by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," Heckman said.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Muslim clerics said Monday that Osama bin Laden's burial at sea was a violation of Islamic tradition that may further provoke extremist calls for revenge attacks against American targets. Although there appears to be some room for debate over the burial - as with many issues within the faith - a wide range of senior Islamic scholars interpreted it as a humiliating disregard for the standard Muslim practice of placing the body in a grave with the head pointed toward the holy city of Mecca.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Friends of Isma'il Raji Faruqi and his wife, Lois, filled a Ritz Carlton ballroom yesterday in a memorial service in which solemn tributes to the slain couple were preceded by the announcement of a $50,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of their killer. The Faruqis, internationally renowned Islamic scholars, were slain in their Cheltenham home on May 27. Those close to the Faruqis assert that the couple died at the hand of an assassin and see the failure to make an arrest in the case as a continuation of offenses against Arabs and Muslims.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man charged with killing Islamic scholars Isma'il and Lois al Faruqi and stabbing their daughter pleaded not guilty yesterday, and his attorney said he was considering an insanity defense. Joseph L. Young, 40, of North Philadelphia, sat quietly beside his attorney, Stephen Heckman, during a brief arraignment yesterday in Montgomery County Court. Heckman entered pleas of not guilty on Young's behalf to charges of murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault, reckless endangering, burglary, criminal trespass and possession of an instrument of crime.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Egypt's leading human-rights group has sued one of the world's most influential Muslim scholars after he ruled that Islamic law calls for the widespread practice of circumcising girls. The grand sheik of Al Azhar University, the premier institution for the world's Sunni Muslims, announced last fall that the practice of removing part or all of a girl's clitoris to reduce her sexual appetite is a duty recommended even by the Prophet Muhammad himself. Sheik Gad Al Haq Ali Gad Al Haq called female circumcision "a noble practice which does honor to women.
NEWS
April 30, 2010 | By Frida Ghitis
Despite much-quoted claims to the contrary, evidence abounds that the sword frequently defeats the pen. If you don't believe me, come to the bustling street in this city where, in plain daylight four years ago, a man named Mohammed Bouyeri cut the throat of Theo Van Gogh, almost severing his head. The Dutch-born Bouyeri plunged a knife into Van Gogh's body, skewering into him a letter threatening to also kill Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a fierce critic of Islam who had collaborated with Van Gogh on a film about the Quran.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned triumphantly to Tehran in February 1979, most Westerners saw him merely as a persecuted religious leader who happened to be thrust into power by a national revolt against the shah. But to followers of Islam, the coming of Khomeini was far more significant than the abdication of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. "It was only in the eyes of Westerners that Khomeini seemed to come from nowhere, or out of the blue," said Mahmoud Ayoub, professor of Islamic Studies at Temple University.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | Daily News wire services
U.S. authorities believe they have a top al Qaeda leader in custody, a U.S. official said yesterday. If the man is Abu Zubaydah, he would be the highest-ranking leader in the terrorist organization to fall into American hands since the Sept. 11 attacks. "All signs point to the fact" that one of the men captured by Pakistani authorities in raids last week is the terrorist leader, the official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity. The man was shot several times by Pakistanis as he tried to escape one of the raids, the official said.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | BY HAKIM AMIR
Once again, world events have focused media attention on the Middle East, and consequently, on Islam. The invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi forces under Saddam Hussein and the subsequent world response have focused the media spotlight on Islam and its followers. With American troops in the Persian Gulf, and more on the way, Americans are right to be interested in and concerned about the position of the American Muslim community. In fact, Americans need to know the position of the larger Islamic community worldwide.
NEWS
February 21, 1989
The growing controversy over Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses has been portrayed as a religious dispute, pitting offended fundamentalist Muslims against an uncomprehending West. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. This conflict - in which Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini has called for the assassination of the author and of publishers of his works - goes far beyond religion. It has become a political dispute of the highest order, in which the leader of one nation is threatening the lives of citizens of other nations.
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