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Islamic Studies

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NEWS
January 16, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After losing out on a $1.5 million chair in Islamic studies last month, Temple University announced it has received a new gift from a local energy executive and former Catholic seminarian to fund a chair in interfaith dialogue. Harry Halloran, 68, who took just one religion course at Temple 30 years ago, offered $1.5 million to finance the Leonard and Arlene Swidler Chair of Interreligous Dialogue. Swidler has been a professor at Temple University since 1966 and is an authority on ecumenism.
NEWS
May 28, 1986 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Isma'il Raji Faruqi and his wife, Lois, were remembered by students and colleagues yesterday as devoted teachers and serious scholars who were well- known in Islamic studies circles around the world. "He was a great professor, and he was just like a father for every Muslim student," said Muhammad Marwat, 30, a graduate student from Pakistan in Islamic studies at Temple University. Faruqi, a professor of religion at Temple, and his wife were found stabbed to death early yesterday morning in their home in Cheltenham Township.
NEWS
January 5, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last spring, an Islamic group came to Temple University with an extremely generous offer: $1.5 million for an endowed chair in Islamic studies to honor religion professor Mahmoud Ayoub. But after months of talks, the deal fell apart when trustees and others raised concerns about the donor, the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), a nonprofit research organization that was included in a government probe into funding of suspected terrorists. "They did not want a chair of Islamic studies funded by a Muslim organization," said Ayoub, a blind, 69-year-old Islamic and interreligious scholar who was to be the first occupant of the chair.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph L. Young has appealed his death sentence for the 1986 slayings of two internationally known Islamic scholars at their Cheltenham home. The appeal, filed by Young's court-appointed attorney, Stephen Heckman, comes less than two weeks after a Montgomery County jury condemned him to death for the fatal stabbings of Isma'il and Lois Faruqi. Young, 44, known as Yusuf Ali, was arrested in 1987 for the May 1986 slaying. The couple died of multiple stab wounds in the early-morning attack.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Exton Community Baptist Church, 114 E. Swedesford Rd., Exton, will hold a special presentation titled "Islam: Principles and Practices" at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The guest speaker is Mustafa A. Ahmed, director of the Foundation for Islamic Education in Villanova. He will speak about events since Sept. 11 and our response to them. Ahmed has been a professor of Islamic studies at the American Open University and has been president of the Islamic Academy for Scientific Research. He earned a master's degree in Islamic studies with honors from Ohio State University.
NEWS
May 31, 1986 | By LEON TAYLOR, Daily News Staff Writer
Latifah Elahi recalls Dr. Isma'il Raji al-Faruqi as a scholarly leader with a quick sense of humor. "He was excellent in teaching the foundations of Islam and the foundations of the Holy Koran," said Elahi, whom Faruqi had instructed in an Islamic Studies course at Temple University in 1979. "He was also a father figure," she added. "He was humorous and interesting . . . It's going to be sad, not having him around to shine his light and have his presence felt. " Elahi was among hundreds of mourners who packed the masjid (sanctuary)
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection began yesterday in the resentencing of Joseph L. Young, who was convicted in 1987 of stabbing to death two internationally known Islamic scholars in their Cheltenham home. When convened, this panel will be the second to decide whether Young, also known as Yusuf Ali, should live the rest of his life in prison or die in the electric chair for the slayings of Isma'il and Lois al-Faruqi four years ago. The 1987 jury that convicted Young on two counts of first-degree murder also condemned him to death.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection is scheduled to begin tomorrow in the resentencing of a North Philadelphia man convicted in 1987 of slaying two internationally known Islamic scholars who lived in Cheltenham Township. Joseph L. Young was sentenced to die in the electric chair for the killings of Isma'il and Lois al-Faruqi four years ago. But the state Supreme Court set aside the sentence in March, saying the trial judge had improperly instructed the jury on how to impose the death sentence. Picking a jury to decide whether Young should die or live in prison for the rest of his life is expected to take a week, according to Montgomery County District Attorney Michael D. Marino, who will argue the case.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | By Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned triumphantly to Tehran in February 1979, most Westerners saw him merely as a persecuted religious leader who happened to be thrust into power by a national revolt against the shah. But to followers of Islam, the coming of Khomeini was far more significant than the abdication of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. "It was only in the eyes of Westerners that Khomeini seemed to come from nowhere, or out of the blue," said Mahmoud Ayoub, professor of Islamic Studies at Temple University.
LIVING
April 13, 1994 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though Ameni Mohammed had earned a college degree in biochemistry, she still believed that she didn't fully understand the logic of life. She returned to Al Azhar University - for a thousand years the world's leading Islamic educational institution - to study sharia, or Islamic law. But having already broken into a scientific field considered to be a man's domain, why would she enter another discipline so often thought to be stacked against women?...
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NEWS
February 9, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An internationally known scholar of Islamic studies whose expertise is in the Quran and relations between Islam and Christianity was selected as the eighth president of Bryn Mawr College yesterday. The appointment of Jane Dammen McAuliffe was announced to the college community by pealing bells from Taylor Hall. McAuliffe, dean of the college of arts and sciences at Georgetown University, said she planned to emphasize the natural sciences and multiculturalism when she takes over from Nancy J. Vickers on July 1. She wants to beef up science offerings and actively recruit international students to the 123-year-old liberal-arts campus.
NEWS
January 16, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After losing out on a $1.5 million chair in Islamic studies last month, Temple University announced it has received a new gift from a local energy executive and former Catholic seminarian to fund a chair in interfaith dialogue. Harry Halloran, 68, who took just one religion course at Temple 30 years ago, offered $1.5 million to finance the Leonard and Arlene Swidler Chair of Interreligous Dialogue. Swidler has been a professor at Temple University since 1966 and is an authority on ecumenism.
NEWS
January 5, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last spring, an Islamic group came to Temple University with an extremely generous offer: $1.5 million for an endowed chair in Islamic studies to honor religion professor Mahmoud Ayoub. But after months of talks, the deal fell apart when trustees and others raised concerns about the donor, the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), a nonprofit research organization that was included in a government probe into funding of suspected terrorists. "They did not want a chair of Islamic studies funded by a Muslim organization," said Ayoub, a blind, 69-year-old Islamic and interreligious scholar who was to be the first occupant of the chair.
NEWS
August 6, 2003 | By Keith Herbert and Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As she sat in police headquarters in St. Paul, Minn., Mine An Ener described her life as a tenured professor at Villanova University. Ener, 38, is a recognized expert on poverty in the modern Islamic world and director of the university's Center for Arab and Islamic Studies. She had published one book, and had another due out soon. She often traveled to the Middle East. "After what I just did, I don't think that I will do much traveling," Ener (pronounced EE-ner) told police.
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Exton Community Baptist Church, 114 E. Swedesford Rd., Exton, will hold a special presentation titled "Islam: Principles and Practices" at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The guest speaker is Mustafa A. Ahmed, director of the Foundation for Islamic Education in Villanova. He will speak about events since Sept. 11 and our response to them. Ahmed has been a professor of Islamic studies at the American Open University and has been president of the Islamic Academy for Scientific Research. He earned a master's degree in Islamic studies with honors from Ohio State University.
LIVING
April 13, 1994 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though Ameni Mohammed had earned a college degree in biochemistry, she still believed that she didn't fully understand the logic of life. She returned to Al Azhar University - for a thousand years the world's leading Islamic educational institution - to study sharia, or Islamic law. But having already broken into a scientific field considered to be a man's domain, why would she enter another discipline so often thought to be stacked against women?...
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph L. Young has appealed his death sentence for the 1986 slayings of two internationally known Islamic scholars at their Cheltenham home. The appeal, filed by Young's court-appointed attorney, Stephen Heckman, comes less than two weeks after a Montgomery County jury condemned him to death for the fatal stabbings of Isma'il and Lois Faruqi. Young, 44, known as Yusuf Ali, was arrested in 1987 for the May 1986 slaying. The couple died of multiple stab wounds in the early-morning attack.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph L. Young of North Philadelphia yesterday was condemned to death for the 1986 slayings of two internationally recognized Islamic scholars at their Cheltenham home. It was the second time a Montgomery County jury pronounced a death sentence on Young, who was convicted in 1987 of fatally stabbing Isma'il and Lois al- Faruqi. The 12-member jury, asked only to decide Young's sentence, deliberated for almost five hours before announcing its decision. "There were a lot of technical questions and a lot of confusing and conflicting testimony" from mental-health experts that had to be sorted out, said jury foreman A. Bruce Jarvis of Abington.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection began yesterday in the resentencing of Joseph L. Young, who was convicted in 1987 of stabbing to death two internationally known Islamic scholars in their Cheltenham home. When convened, this panel will be the second to decide whether Young, also known as Yusuf Ali, should live the rest of his life in prison or die in the electric chair for the slayings of Isma'il and Lois al-Faruqi four years ago. The 1987 jury that convicted Young on two counts of first-degree murder also condemned him to death.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jury selection is scheduled to begin tomorrow in the resentencing of a North Philadelphia man convicted in 1987 of slaying two internationally known Islamic scholars who lived in Cheltenham Township. Joseph L. Young was sentenced to die in the electric chair for the killings of Isma'il and Lois al-Faruqi four years ago. But the state Supreme Court set aside the sentence in March, saying the trial judge had improperly instructed the jury on how to impose the death sentence. Picking a jury to decide whether Young should die or live in prison for the rest of his life is expected to take a week, according to Montgomery County District Attorney Michael D. Marino, who will argue the case.
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