CollectionsIsolation
IN THE NEWS

Isolation

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In this wildly comic film that's part Taxi and part Taxi Driver, cabbie Chung Nam is a second-generation Korean in Tokyo, making his way in a land that celebrates ethnic purity. An outsider in his adopted country and a stranger to his own, Chung is in the position of navigating streets that natives get lost in and serving people who say they dislike Koreans, but will make an exception of him. To cap off his isolation from the mainstream, Chung is in love with a Filipina bar girl who works for his mother.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
The isolation used to give Harold Pyle peace of mind. He milked his cows and planted and harvested his corn in the quiet, secluded hills of his farm in Charlestown Township. Pyle felt protected from the suburban housing tracts and commuter traffic by the other farms that surrounded his. There was safety in numbers. But now, Pyle and his family feel a different kind of isolation, which has altered their lifestyle and might force them to sell their 130-acre farm, one of the last working dairy farms between Downingtown and Philadelphia, Pyle says.
NEWS
May 9, 1999 | By Liza M. Rodriguez
Norm, the freeloading character in Cheers, earned a place in viewers' hearts because he represented a sense of place and belonging for which we all search. He found a place where everybody knew his name, a bar where he could run a tab and where a stool was his. The Latino community in North Philadelphia is not much different. Latinos are looking for a place to call home - a search complicated by the increasing diversity of the Latino community. Philadelphia's largest concentration of Latinos lives between Roosevelt Boulevard, Girard Avenue, Ninth Street and Kensington Avenue.
NEWS
June 14, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
In announcing the passage of a U.N. Security Council resolution imposing sanctions on Iran, President Obama stressed - not once, but twice - Iran's increasing "isolation" from the world. This claim is not surprising considering that, after 16 months of an "extended hand" policy, in response to which Iran actually accelerated its nuclear program - more centrifuges, more enrichment sites, higher enrichment levels - Iranian "isolation" is about the only achievement to which the administration can even plausibly lay claim.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Benoit Jacquot's Seventh Heaven begins with an out-of-focus freeze-frame of its troubled protagonist, Mathilde (Sandrine Kiberlain), standing on a Paris street corner. Jacquot's last film, the extraordinary Single Girl, ended with a similarly stopped-in-time shot of its protagonist standing isolated amid crowds of onrushing Parisians. Although the approach and style of Seventh Heaven differs from the radical, real-time narrative of A Single Girl, both films explore a woman's soul and solitude in extraordinary ways.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the second time since his incarceration at the city's prison complex two months ago, carjacking suspect Thomas Jones has been ordered into 22 hours of daily isolation, a condition typically imposed only upon murderers, escapees, and inmates who assault guards. Prison spokesman Bob Eskind said yesterday that Jones was placed in "administrative segregation" 11 days ago because his is a "high-profile" case, potentially putting him at greater risk of harm than others in custody.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anybody likely to turn against outspoken British playwright Harold Pinter has probably done so by now. So his latest anti-American rant after winning the Nobel Prize this year can only pique interest in his work. How, theatrically speaking, is Pinter expressing his chronic outrage in his newest play, Celebration? Quite engagingly, one assumes, since its current run at the off-Broadway Atlantic Theater Company paired with his first play, The Room, has been extended through Jan. 21. It's a provocative, satisfying double bill.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were many times during Khasiem Carr's tumultuous journey through Pennsylvania's mental health and prison systems when it seemed things couldn't get worse. Then, they generally did. For instance, after two months in solitary confinement at the Bucks County prison, Carr was refusing food and water, and was rushed to the hospital to be treated for dehydration and malnutrition. After more than a year in solitary, he entered a guilty plea in hope of getting out of the hole and into mental-health care in a state prison.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Unidentified Fire Department emergency services worker (top) wasn't dressed for the cold during a hazardous material excercise yesterday at Einstein Medical Center. Firefighters (left) look like space men in isolation gear.
NEWS
February 13, 2004
IT'S SO NICE to see that not only has Joseph Smith, the accused killer of Carlie Brucia, been transferred to another prison, but he's now in isolation "for his safety. " Only in this country do we coddle criminals and then make heroes of them (Charles Manson, Mumia Abu-Jamal, ad nauseam). Why put Smith in isolation? Put him in general population and let him be Jeffrey Dahmered. First, he murders a baby - now he's going to rob the taxpayers by getting special treatment? How backward.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
May 18, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities.   For J. Barrett and Janet VanDame, Franconia Township had the perfect house, just what they needed five years ago for taking care of his parents, both 95 years old. "We had been looking for something with single-floor living that could accommodate them, and this was it," Barrett VanDame says of the house they moved to from Souderton Borough. Halver and Mary VanDame have died since their son and daughter-in-law moved to this Montgomery County community, but Barrett and Janet have no intention of leaving Franconia.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
THE PEOPLE who love what the Sixers are doing under Sam Hinkie love it even more today. The people who think that Hinkie is doomed to failure have not yet been revived. Everyone's opinion is now set even further in concrete. Thank you, Sam. Watching Michael Carter-Williams for the last year-plus, it became more and more obvious that he wasn't going to be the point guard when/if this team began making playoff runs, mostly because he isn't a good shooter from anywhere on the floor, partly because he isn't exactly rugged as a presence.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
What are you willing to go through to acquire an ultra-rare recording? Acting on hazy reports that some of the most desirable country blues recordings ever were dumped, 80 years ago, in the Milwaukee River near Grafton, Wis., journalist and collector Amanda Petrusich learned to scuba dive, dove, and lived to write about it in her book Do Not Sell at Any Price: The Wild, Obsessive Hunt for the World's Rarest 78rpm Records (Scribner, 272 pages,...
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were many times during Khasiem Carr's tumultuous journey through Pennsylvania's mental health and prison systems when it seemed things couldn't get worse. Then, they generally did. For instance, after two months in solitary confinement at the Bucks County prison, Carr was refusing food and water, and was rushed to the hospital to be treated for dehydration and malnutrition. After more than a year in solitary, he entered a guilty plea in hope of getting out of the hole and into mental-health care in a state prison.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A recent traveler to West Africa who was evaluated for Ebola at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania does not have the disease, the hospital said Friday. The patient's blood sample was tested at the state lab in Lionville, Chester County, and showed no evidence of the deadly virus, said Susan Phillips, Penn Medicine's senior vice president for public affairs. She said the hospital and the state lab have been in contact with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hours before a Central Bucks school board meeting where parents will undoubtedly demand to know more about alleged hazing at a family football picnic, the Central Bucks West head football coach said Tuesday he hopes it was a "one-time, isolated incident" and that the players are "inherently good young men. " In a statement released by his attorney, coach Brian Hensel said the Aug. 16 hazing - which has been described as players groping the private...
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Linda Loyd, and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospital and public health officials are acutely aware of the public dismay at the poor handling of the first case of Ebola diagnosed - too late - in this country. Thomas E. Duncan, 42, arrived in Dallas from Liberia on Sept. 20. He became sick and went to a Dallas hospital on Sept. 25, but was misdiagnosed and sent home. He returned to the hospital by ambulance on Sunday and is now in isolation, in serious condition. About 50 people who came into contact with him after he developed symptoms - which is when the disease is contagious - are being monitored closely, including four family members who are under quarantine for 21 days at a Dallas apartment complex.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY MARC J. DUNKELMAN
AMERICANS LIKE to believe that our exceptional story was cooked up in the proverbial melting pot. And it's true that we've broadly taken strength from our diversity. But the way we engage our differences has more recently begun to shift. We're more tolerant today than we've ever been, but we're also more likely to wall ourselves off from those who hold opposing points of view. As a result, the latitude to lead lives of our own choosing allows and sometimes compels us to narrow the horizons of our individual experience.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Caring for a seriously ill family member is so all-consuming, Elissa Lewin says, that a person often "forgets to breathe. " That's breathe, as in stop , exhale , and relax - a stress-reducing, health-enhancing, mind-centering pause in the 24/7 flow of full-time caregiving. "Put your pinkie to your navel, and take a belly breath," Lewin, 59, says, as those of us seated around the table at the Colonial Inn at Smithville, Atlantic County, follow the leader. It's the second day of a "Respite Retreat for Men" sponsored by Nancy's House (nancys-house.org)
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Kyle Hightower and Mike Schneider, Associated Press
SANFORD, Fla. - The six jurors and four alternates eventually picked to hear the second-degree murder case of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman will be sequestered for the two to four weeks the trial will last, the judge presiding over the case said for the first time Thursday. Circuit Judge Debra Nelson told a potential juror on the fourth day of selection that all panelists will be kept isolated. During the first four days of jury selection, attorneys have asked potential jurors about the hardships they would face if they were kept away from their families during the trial.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|