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Israeli Arabs

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NEWS
December 22, 1987 | By Juan O. Tamayo, Knight-Ridder News Service (James McCartney of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article.)
Israel's traditionally moderate Arab citizens protested and rioted for the first time yesterday in support of rebellious Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza strip, as seven Arab towns in Israel were rocked by violence. The spread of violence was part of a general strike called by thousands of Israeli Arabs in sympathy with the Palestinians. At least 19 Palestinians have been killed in nearly two weeks of unrest, Israeli military spokesmen say, including three who were killed yesterday in the West Bank.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Jewish and Arab Israelis joined hands yesterday in two demonstrations for equal rights and peace. In the town of Akko, several hundred Israeli Arabs and Jews joined hands creating a human chain to protest a right-wing politician's idea of transferring Arab residents out of the coastal town. The demonstrators marched from Akko's predominantly Arab Old City to its newer section to show their opposition to the proposal, made by Deputy Mayor David Bar-Lev. Bar-Lev, a member of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's Likud bloc, is a candidate for mayor in municipal elections Feb. 28. Also, about 85 Palestinians and 20 Jews marched through the Arab village of Beit Safafa, part of Jerusalem, holding signs that read: "Equal rights for Arabs and Jews," and, "Peace for Two Nations," participants said.
NEWS
July 11, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The 26-foot-high concrete and razor wire barrier down the hill from Najeh Abu Mukh's house cuts him off from relatives and the West Bank. But the Arab Israeli gas-station worker said he did not mind, because the controversial Israeli barrier has done something years of failed peace talks have not: It has taken the bloody Israeli-Palestinian conflict away from his home. Like many Arab Israeli citizens who live in northern Israel along the security barrier erected this year, Abu Mukh agrees with the Israeli government that it's beneficial.
NEWS
September 11, 2001 | By Sudarsan Raghavan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even if Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat manage to resume talks today, the likelihood that they can end the killing seems to be receding. One particularly ominous sign of how pervasive the violence has become was the suicide bombing Sunday at a railroad station in northern Israel that killed three and was blamed on an Arab citizen of Israel. Israeli officials identified the bomber as Mohammad Shaker Habashi, 48, and authorities believe he is the first Israeli Arab to carry out a suicide attack.
NEWS
March 22, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Arabs from Cairo to the West Bank and Gaza raise their voices against the war, Israeli Arabs in this port city are snubbing America, too. Arab community leaders have turned down an invitation by American soldiers to visit U.S. Patriot missile batteries installed on the beachfront here as protection for Israel against possible Scud missile attacks from Iraq. The Arab leaders were scheduled to visit the site Wednesday, along with other municipal leaders, for a get-acquainted meeting and dinner.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | By Eric Rozenman
Israeli Arabs, not Palestinians, are suspected in the late August murder of two Jewish hitchhikers and in the Sept. 5 car-bombings in Tiberias and Haifa. One suspect has been linked to the Islamic Resistance Movement (Hamas), based in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. But the other 10 have been tied to Israel's own, previously nonviolent, Islamic Movement. Israeli leaders cautioned against negative stereotypes of the country's minority citizens. Nevertheless, security officials urged a crackdown on the Islamic Movement, a legal political party.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
JERUSALEM POLICE HOLD 4 ISRAELI ARABS IN FEB. SLAYING OF 3 SOLDIERS Police have captured four Israeli Arabs suspected of hacking to death three soldiers last month at a training camp, Police Commissioner Yaakov Terner announced yesterday. He said the suspects were members of Islamic Jihad, a Moslem fundamentalist organization. Two were arrested on Feb. 26 and two more yesterday, he said. The Feb. 14 attack at a base in northern Israel has brought criticism of the army's preparedness, and the disclosure that the attackers were Israeli Arabs could cause a storm.
NEWS
April 1, 1988
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir described for cheering Jewish settlers yesterday the goal of new restrictions on the Palestinian population of the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. "We will continue to act against the violence," he said, referring to the past four months of riots, "until we stamp it out. " His words indicate that Mr. Shamir still fails to grasp the meaning of what is happening in the occupied territories. What's going on there is not random rioting or the work of outside agitators.
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jawdat Kabha couldn't get a telephone hookup for his home in the occupied West Bank, so he ran a line from his aunt's place just a few hundred feet away in Israel. It's so close and yet far enough to be on a different end of the village, a different side of the border and home to a completely different set of Palestinian aspirations. When Kabha calls the Israeli side to discuss the future, he hears what sounds like an unfamiliar language. In fact, Bartaa is not just one village but one extended family of about 5,000 Palestinians nearly all named Kabha.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday dissolved a high-profile committee assigned to overhaul the country's military draft law to spread the burden among more sectors of society, conscripting ultra-Orthodox Jews and requiring Israeli Arabs to perform civilian service. The issue is one of the most charged in Israeli society and could create a coalition crisis. The country's secular majority considers the mass exemptions unjust, while the ultra-Orthodox say they are serving the state by serving God. Compulsory service for Israel's Arab minority is just as fraught.
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NEWS
November 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM - Israeli authorities arrested an Arab Israeli on Thursday on accusations that he planted a bomb on a bus in Tel Aviv that wounded 27 people and threatened to sabotage efforts to broker a cease-fire to end the fighting in Gaza, police said. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said that the man, from the village of Taybeh, in Israel, was connected to the Hamas and Islamic Jihad militant groups. A Palestinian militant cell based in the West Bank village of Beit Lakiya sent the man on Wednesday to place a bomb connected to a mobile phone on the bus, Rosenfeld said.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Aron Heller, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday dissolved a high-profile committee assigned to overhaul the country's military draft law to spread the burden among more sectors of society, conscripting ultra-Orthodox Jews and requiring Israeli Arabs to perform civilian service. The issue is one of the most charged in Israeli society and could create a coalition crisis. The country's secular majority considers the mass exemptions unjust, while the ultra-Orthodox say they are serving the state by serving God. Compulsory service for Israel's Arab minority is just as fraught.
NEWS
May 31, 2011
AT LOVE PARK, world-beat music filled the air with peace, love, harmony. A few blocks west on JFK Boulevard, outside the Israeli consulate, low-key chants rose. The pro- and anti-Israel gatherings were provoked by President Obama's near-demand of something that previously had been a U.S. suggestion. Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu declined it before a joint session of Congress. Obama prodded Israel to use the 1967 cease-fire lines as a starting point for border talks. While this was understood as a U.S. wish in the past, Obama was the first president to press it on Israel, while demanding nothing of substance from the Palestinians.
NEWS
October 31, 2010 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
JERUSALEM - On the Mamilla Mall, on a balmy fall evening, a group of Israelis and tourists swayed to the piped-in beat of a paso doble, dancing on an open-air walkway lined with chic shops selling jewelry and clothing. Families with strollers watched, young people flirted, intellectuals perused books in nearby Steinmatsky's or sipped cappuccino in Café Café. Yet a five-minute walk away stood the Jaffa Gate entrance to the hotly contested Old City, and 10 minutes distant were the East Jerusalem neighborhoods that Palestinians want for their capital.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Saturday's editorial about the lack of progress toward Middle East peace ("Where is love?") noted a recent Egyptian court decision to strip citizenship from Egyptians who marry Israelis. Some context may be useful. By the way, Egypt is not the only Arab country with a peace treaty with Israel. Jordan has had one since 1994. The Egyptian court decision, which is largely symbolic, has a cruel Israeli parallel. In 2003, Israel's parliament enacted a law that prohibits any of its thousands of Christian and Muslim citizens who marry Palestinians from living together with their spouses.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
IN AN OP-ED, Carol Towarnicky described the miseries suffered by Arabs who live in Beit Sahour and Bethlehem in Israel's West Bank. I'm aware of the difficulties faced by the Arabs there, and there is plenty of room for legitimate criticism of Israel. But she omitted relevant information when she wrote, "Only a few checkpoints are on the border between Israel and the West Bank. Most of them are in Palestinian lands, undercutting the rationale that they are for security. . . And then there is the Wall - in the Bethlehem district, it's a concrete barrier 30 feet high that snakes along the road and through the fields, often cutting off one part of Palestinian land from another.
NEWS
July 18, 2007 | By Trudy Rubin
A while back, I wrote a column wondering whether there was a secret White House doctrine dictating policy in the Middle East: the Doctrine of Two Years Too Late. That doctrine was in full view this week when President Bush proposed steps to bolster moderate Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and revive an Israeli-Palestinian peace process. If Bush had taken these steps in 2005, when Abbas was elected, I doubt the radical Islamic movement Hamas would have won Palestinian legislative elections, or taken control of Gaza.
NEWS
June 27, 2007 | Gregory J. W. Urwin
Gregory J. W. Urwin is a professor of history and associate director of the center for the study of force and diplomacy at Temple University Ever since the Twin Towers disintegrated into rubble Sept. 11, 2001, the cries of "Death to America!" coming from Arab streets have sounded more ominous than simple posturing. The recently squelched plot to blow up JFK Airport and the prospect of Iran becoming a nuclear power fill Americans with unspoken dread that catastrophe lurks. That's just how terrorists want us to think.
NEWS
January 2, 2007 | By George Bisharat
Americans owe a debt to former President Jimmy Carter for speaking long hidden but vital truths. His book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid breaks the taboo barring criticism in the United States of Israel's discriminatory treatment of Palestinians. Our government's tacit acceptance of Israel's unfair policies causes global hostility against us. Israel's friends have attacked Carter, a Nobel laureate who has worked tirelessly for Middle East peace, even raising the specter of anti-Semitism.
NEWS
October 29, 2006 | By Ned Warwick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the 32d time since Israel was founded in 1948, it will have a new coalition government, one that nearly spans the globe of political possibilities. It has a centrist leadership, a left-wing partner, and now a far right-wing party, led by the polarizing Avigdor Lieberman, who bluntly believes Arabs and Jews can't live together and once called for the execution of Israeli Arab lawmakers who talked to the militant groups Hezbollah and Hamas. So how can this coalition of very strange bedfellows accomplish anything of significance, and is there a quilt wide enough to throw across them?
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