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NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
I WILL FOREGO my moment of silence to praise NBC's Bob Costas for planning his personal moment of silence Friday night out of respect to the 11 Israeli athletes and coaches murdered by Palestinian terrorists during the 1972 Games in Munich.   Costas was only 20 when it happened, but he clearly remembers what happened, who did it and why. Stoking those memories reveals a lot about where we (the U.S., the media, the West) is today. Here's what happened, described by renowned sports ace Red Smith in the New York Times: "It was 4:30 a.m. when Palestinian terrorists invaded the housing complex where athletes from 121 nations live and shot their way into the Israeli quarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2015 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
When my husband asked me whether I wanted to accompany him to Berlin in July, my initial reaction was: Why? He was going as part of the European Maccabi Games - an international Jewish sporting competition formed in the 1920s that promotes pride and camaraderie - but I was anything but eager to visit the country where the Nazi regime had orchestrated the slaughtering of six million Jews and millions of others. I thought long and hard before making a decision. Over the years, I had gleaned intimate firsthand accounts from interviewing survivors, including family.
SPORTS
September 21, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
The best hope Israel had for an Olympic medal was Udi Karmi, the fourth- place finisher in the fencing world championships last year. But he is at home, not in Seoul. The Israeli's next best hope, boxer Yehuda Ben-Haim, came to Seoul but was eliminated last night when he failed to appear for his 106-pound bout. It's because of the conflict between the Olympics and Jewish Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. The Israelis brought 19 athletes to the Games, hoping that arrangements could be made to either postpone or advance their dates of competition around Yom Kippur, which is observed from sundown Wednesday to sundown Thursday in Seoul.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Helen Schary Motro
As 40 Israeli athletes geared up for the opening of the Olympics in Sydney, Israelis back home were glued to their televisions, watching footage of the mutilated corpses of the Olympians' predecessors murdered by terrorists at the 1972 games in Munich. These images were juxtaposed with clips of the young team members marching joyously in the inaugural ceremony at the Munich games days before they were kidnapped from the Olympic Village and then slain by Palestinian members of Black September.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Bob Ford contributed to this article
A bomb exploded in a crowded Atlanta park and Swiss Olympian Christine Stueckelberger, along with millions of others, remembered Munich. "This brought memories I've tried very hard not to think about," said Stueckelberger, an equestrian competitor at both these Games and at Munich in 1972. "I saw the acts of terrorism committed against the Israelis. I still can't bring myself to speak about it. " Suddenly, after nearly 24 years, terrorism again threatened to overwhelm an Olympics.
SPORTS
July 23, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
The relatives of 11 Israeli athletes slain at the Munich Olympics in 1972 said yesterday the International Olympic Committee is playing politics with a request to honor the memory of their loved ones. The group had requested a moment of silence at Friday night's Opening Ceremonies to honor the Israelis killed at the 1972 Games. They also wanted the athletes' 14 children, who are attending their first Olympics as a group, to be received as a delegation. Both requests were denied.
NEWS
December 23, 2005 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
IN SEPTEMBER 1972, I was a rather sedentary 10-year-old who preferred reading in her bedroom to playing outdoors. That's probably why the Summer Olympics that year didn't hold much interest for me. It was only when I learned of the attack against the Israeli athletes and the subsequent hostage crisis that I put away my books and glued myself to the TV. Jim McKay became my guide, leading me through the horrendous events of those late summer days...
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 2002, during the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney watched proudly as Americans hoisted a tattered U.S. flag salvaged from the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. And nobody accused Romney or his Olympic committee of "politicizing" the games. I thought of Salt Lake City when I read about the campaign to commemorate the 11 Israeli athletes murdered by terrorists at the Games in Munich 40 years ago. A petition demanding a moment of silence at this summer's Olympics in London, authored by a widow of one of the slain athletes, has garnered more than 100,000 signatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are many high-quality documentaries, feature films and network shows that examine all that has happened in the Middle East. One of the latest, Steven Spielberg's Oscar-nominated Munich, takes us back to the '72 Olympic Games, where 11 Israeli athletes were killed by Palestinian terrorists. He looks at Israel's response to that tragedy. While Munich is a fantastic movie, Universal played a bit of a shell game with the film's DVD release. There are two DVD packages: One has just the movie and a short intro by Spielberg, while the two-disc "limited edition" version has all the goodies.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Alvin S. Hornstein
Now that another Olympics has come and gone, fortunately without any major disaster - except a controversy about doping, the protests of the Aborigines and the arrogance of a few American athletes - we can turn our thoughts to 2004 when the games return to their original locale, Athens. The International Olympic Committee's retiring (hurrah) president, Juan Antonio Samaranch, is threatening to move the games if the Greek committee doesn't get its act together. I believe we should take another look at how and where they're held.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2015 | By Jan L. Apple, For The Inquirer
When my husband asked me whether I wanted to accompany him to Berlin in July, my initial reaction was: Why? He was going as part of the European Maccabi Games - an international Jewish sporting competition formed in the 1920s that promotes pride and camaraderie - but I was anything but eager to visit the country where the Nazi regime had orchestrated the slaughtering of six million Jews and millions of others. I thought long and hard before making a decision. Over the years, I had gleaned intimate firsthand accounts from interviewing survivors, including family.
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
I WILL FOREGO my moment of silence to praise NBC's Bob Costas for planning his personal moment of silence Friday night out of respect to the 11 Israeli athletes and coaches murdered by Palestinian terrorists during the 1972 Games in Munich.   Costas was only 20 when it happened, but he clearly remembers what happened, who did it and why. Stoking those memories reveals a lot about where we (the U.S., the media, the West) is today. Here's what happened, described by renowned sports ace Red Smith in the New York Times: "It was 4:30 a.m. when Palestinian terrorists invaded the housing complex where athletes from 121 nations live and shot their way into the Israeli quarters.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 2002, during the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney watched proudly as Americans hoisted a tattered U.S. flag salvaged from the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. And nobody accused Romney or his Olympic committee of "politicizing" the games. I thought of Salt Lake City when I read about the campaign to commemorate the 11 Israeli athletes murdered by terrorists at the Games in Munich 40 years ago. A petition demanding a moment of silence at this summer's Olympics in London, authored by a widow of one of the slain athletes, has garnered more than 100,000 signatures.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are many high-quality documentaries, feature films and network shows that examine all that has happened in the Middle East. One of the latest, Steven Spielberg's Oscar-nominated Munich, takes us back to the '72 Olympic Games, where 11 Israeli athletes were killed by Palestinian terrorists. He looks at Israel's response to that tragedy. While Munich is a fantastic movie, Universal played a bit of a shell game with the film's DVD release. There are two DVD packages: One has just the movie and a short intro by Spielberg, while the two-disc "limited edition" version has all the goodies.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | By Alan H. Luxenberg
As a Hebrew-school teacher, I try to make use of popular culture to illuminate issues of Jewish concern, and I try to use current events to launch into explorations of history, both recent and ancient. Steven Spielberg's Munich offers such a "teaching opportunity. " When Time magazine put Spielberg on its cover in advance of the movie's opening, I brought the cover into my 10th-grade classes, mentioning the controversy that was brewing, and elicited class discussion about the 1972 massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the Olympics in Munich.
NEWS
January 9, 2006 | By TOM McMILLEN
IN SEPTEMBER 1972, I was 20 and happy to be playing forward on the U.S. basketball team at the Olympics in Munich. The Olympic Village was a special place, a seemingly peaceful world focused on order, competition, the purity of sport - a friendly community inhabited by young, disciplined athletes participating in a global contest. All that changed on the terrible morning of Sept. 5, when I was awakened to learn that Palestinian terrorists had stormed the dorm where the Israeli delegation was housed.
NEWS
December 23, 2005 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
IN SEPTEMBER 1972, I was a rather sedentary 10-year-old who preferred reading in her bedroom to playing outdoors. That's probably why the Summer Olympics that year didn't hold much interest for me. It was only when I learned of the attack against the Israeli athletes and the subsequent hostage crisis that I put away my books and glued myself to the TV. Jim McKay became my guide, leading me through the horrendous events of those late summer days...
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | By Alvin S. Hornstein
Now that another Olympics has come and gone, fortunately without any major disaster - except a controversy about doping, the protests of the Aborigines and the arrogance of a few American athletes - we can turn our thoughts to 2004 when the games return to their original locale, Athens. The International Olympic Committee's retiring (hurrah) president, Juan Antonio Samaranch, is threatening to move the games if the Greek committee doesn't get its act together. I believe we should take another look at how and where they're held.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | By Helen Schary Motro
As 40 Israeli athletes geared up for the opening of the Olympics in Sydney, Israelis back home were glued to their televisions, watching footage of the mutilated corpses of the Olympians' predecessors murdered by terrorists at the 1972 games in Munich. These images were juxtaposed with clips of the young team members marching joyously in the inaugural ceremony at the Munich games days before they were kidnapped from the Olympic Village and then slain by Palestinian members of Black September.
NEWS
July 28, 1996 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Bob Ford contributed to this article
A bomb exploded in a crowded Atlanta park and Swiss Olympian Christine Stueckelberger, along with millions of others, remembered Munich. "This brought memories I've tried very hard not to think about," said Stueckelberger, an equestrian competitor at both these Games and at Munich in 1972. "I saw the acts of terrorism committed against the Israelis. I still can't bring myself to speak about it. " Suddenly, after nearly 24 years, terrorism again threatened to overwhelm an Olympics.
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