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NEWS
November 1, 1988 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man named Yosef cradled a toddler in his arms, fought back tears and reflected on the tragedy that had struck his friends, the Weisses, who used to live down the hall from him in an apartment block in this Jerusalem suburb. Yosef, 28, heard on the radio Sunday night that four Israeli civilians had burned to death when Palestinians pelted a bus with firebombs near the West Bank city of Jericho. Not until yesterday did he learn that the victims were Rachel Weiss, 26, and her three sons, ages 10 months to 3 years.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Daniella Cheslow, Associated Press
TEL AVIV, Israel - More than 400,000 Israelis poured into streets across the country Saturday night, Israeli media estimated, in a show of strength behind a social protest movement that has rocked the country for two months. The demonstrations in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Haifa, and elsewhere against Israel's high cost of living, its housing crisis, and distorted distribution of wealth marked the high point - so far - of a summerlong grassroots protest movement that has ballooned from a few tents in Tel Aviv to a nationwide phenomenon that has delivered Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's government its most serious domestic crisis.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Josef Federman, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's senior coalition partner says that reaching a final peace agreement with the Palestinians is unrealistic at the current time and that the sides should instead pursue an interim arrangement. Finance Minister Yair Lapid's assessment, delivered in a published interview Sunday just days before the arrival of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, throws a contentious idea into the mix as the United States searches for ways to restart peace talks.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - An Israeli attack on Iran's nuclear program could trigger a monthlong war on multiple fronts, killing hundreds of Israelis or more, the Israeli cabinet's civil defense chief warned in an interview published Wednesday. It was the most explicit assessment yet of how the government sees events unfolding in the aftermath of an Israeli attack. Matan Vilnai, stepping down as the "home front" cabinet minister to become Israel's ambassador to China, described the scenarios to Israel's Maariv daily.
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Geography and topography have given Israel a healthy harvest that would warm the heart of any cardiologist: olives instead of cows, grains and beans instead of beef, coastline instead of grazing land. There's a healthy life- affirming freshness about Israeli cuisine that reflects the vitality of the country. Despite its often uneasy mix of beliefs and backgrounds, Israel seems to live in culinary harmony with the Arabs, borrowing freely from the flavors of Africa and the East. The outcome?
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andean flute music wafts from Victor Chico's open trailer window and gets lost in the wind gusting up the mountain from the plain west of the River Jordan. "It is rather curious," shrugged Chico, a Peruvian mestizo whose Incan and Spanish ancestry shows in his golden skin, his dark eyes and his hair straight and black beneath his knitted yamulke. Raised as a Roman Catholic, he is now an Israeli Jew, one of 56 Peruvians who found Judaism in the Andes, converted and last month immigrated to Israel.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The exhibition of contemporary Israeli painting at the Port of History Museum confirms the oft-made observation that Israel is a European country plunked down in the Middle East. The work presented by seven Israeli artists varies in its dedication to indigenous themes, but it's all Euro- internationalist at its roots. The seven, all men, are Tsibi Geva, Menashe Kadishman, Gabi Klasmer, Uri Lifshitz, Joshua Neustein, Izhar Patkin and Shaoul Smira. (The show was to have included a woman, Tamar Getter, but her current work wasn't available.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Ian Deitch, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Former Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, 96, who clung throughout his life to the belief that Israel should hang on to territory and never trust an Arab regime, died Saturday at a nursing home in the town of Herzliya, north of Tel Aviv. Israeli media said Mr. Shamir had suffered from Alzheimer's disease for years. In his younger days, Mr. Shamir served as a Jewish underground leader who fought the British as well as Arab militias before Israel's creation in 1948.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The homeless Israelis who had been given refuge by Palestinian authorities in the West Bank town of Jericho have returned to Israel for the Jewish New Year, and a court has lifted a ban on their return to their homes in a Jerusalem suburb. A Jerusalem judge on Thursday said leaders of the group could return to Mevasseret Zion, and the Israelis left Jericho on Tuesday and Wednesday in anticipation of the decision. They left so quietly that at least one official at Israel's internal security ministry was not aware as late as Thursday that they had begun to leave.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid all the talk of border demarcation and water-sharing arrangements, nonbelligerency pacts and aviation rights, the average Israeli really only has one question: "When do we get to go to Petra?" For years, the red-stone ruins of Jordan's leading tourist attraction have held an almost mystical attraction for Israelis. The most daring Israelis, and perhaps reckless, stole across the armed border to see the ancient buildings and tombs carved into a sandstone canyon. This fascination stands in marked contrast with the almost lackadaisical attitude of many Israelis to the historic summit yesterday between King Hussein of Jordan and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and their pact to end the technical state of war. Peace with the Egyptians, prompted by President Anwar el-Sadat's journey to Jerusalem 17 years ago, was unprecedented.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
The truth will set you free. It's a favorite expression, soothing in a world where doubt is among our greatest enemies. We take "facts" at face value because it's uncomfortable not to, and we almost always forget to ask, "Which truth?" Which truth will set us free, and are there others that might enslave us despite attempts to break their chains? These are the questions playwright Emily Acker probes in I Am Not My Motherland , her first full-length stage production, presented by Orbiter 3 at St. Stephen's Theater.
NEWS
April 25, 2016
Elliott Abrams served on the staffs of Sens. Henry Jackson and Daniel Patrick Moynihan and in the Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush administrations Since my days working for Sen. Henry "Scoop" Jackson (D., Wash.), events in the Middle East and especially concerning the security of Israel have been at the center of my attention. And if Israel's security and its relationship with the United States are a key concern, Ted Cruz should get your vote. More broadly, if your concern is America's position in the Middle East, your vote should go to Cruz.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Israelis have been debating whether the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin, 20 years ago this month, has irrevocably altered the course of Israeli (and Mideast) history. My answer is yes. To understand the profound consequences of Rabin's murder, one need only contrast this military hero and his era with the life and times of Benjamin "Bibi" Netanyahu, who has held the prime ministership for nearly 10 of the 20 years since Rabin's murder, and will visit the White House this week. "1995 was a reset moment in Israel's history, a shift from secular pragmatists to ideologues," says Dan Ephron, author of Killing a King: the Assassination of Rabin and the Remaking of Israel . That gap was on full display in Israel in recent days.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On a bright, sunny day in September of 1993, I stood on the White House lawn watching Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat sign the Oslo peace accords in front of President Bill Clinton. At that moment, it was possible to suspend disbelief and imagine a two-state solution, with Israel and Palestine living side by side. Twenty years on, Rabin and Arafat are dead, and so is the Oslo peace process - although politicians from Israel and the West are loath to admit this. Last week at the United Nations, however, Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas said his government could no longer be bound by the Oslo pact, emphasizing Israeli settlement-building on the West Bank among his many grievances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
We hear so much about the uneasy relationship across the Israeli-Palestinian divide that we tend to forget that fully 20 percent of Israeli citizens are Arab. What does it mean to be an Israeli Arab (or Arab Israeli)? Is that an identity - or a recipe for inner discord? These are just some of the tantalizing questions raised in the Israeli import A Borrowed Identity , an extraordinary coming-of-age story about Eyad, a Palestinian boy from a small village who grows up to become a cosmopolitan Israeli.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY TIRDAD DERAKHSHANI, Inquirer Staff Writer tirdad@phillynews.com, 215-854-2736
WE HEAR so much about the uneasy relationship across the Israeli-Palestinian divide that we tend to forget that fully 20 percent of Israeli citizens are Arab. What does it mean to be an Israeli Arab (or Arab Israeli)? Is that an identity - or a recipe for inner discord? These are just some of the tantalizing questions raised in the Israeli import "A Borrowed Identity," an extraordinary coming-of-age story about Eyad, a Palestinian boy from a small village who grows up to become a cosmopolitan Israeli.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Israeli officials are orchestrating a campaign to have Congress scuttle the Iran nuclear deal by voting it down and overriding a promised presidential veto. Republican presidential hopefuls have jumped on the bandwagon, denouncing the deal as if it heralded the end of the world. There are indeed very serious concerns about the details, which the administration must try to allay. And Israel, whose right to exist is challenged by Iran, has every right to be concerned. But before Capitol Hill sinks into hysteria, legislators need to know that many former Israeli intelligence and national security officials oppose their government's approach - and think a congressional veto would be a disaster.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four Israeli companies plan to open offices in Philadelphia, Mayor Nutter said Tuesday, following his return from a three-day business visit to Tel Aviv. The trip was a continuation of a trade mission in November 2013 and this time included a stop in Frankfurt, Germany. Nutter signed a sister-city agreement with Frankfurt - Philadelphia's first in 23 years - before traveling to Tel Aviv, which has been a sister city to Philadelphia since 1967 and is also a sister city to Frankfurt.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth Muscal, 79, of Penn Valley, an accomplished Israeli citizen who spent much of her adult life here, died Thursday, June 11, in Tel Aviv. She had long been ill with dementia. Mrs. Muscal was the wife of Zvi Muscal, and the couple arrived to Philadelphia in 1979 when he was in charge of establishing a branch of Bank HaPoalim here. The Muscals fell in love with the city, and he founded First Executive Bank, then on Walnut Street. Several years ago, the Muscals returned to Tel Aviv.
SPORTS
April 24, 2015 | BY SHAMUS CLANCY, Daily News Staff Writer clancys@phillynews.com
HOW FAR would someone go to win a football game? Lower Merion's Ari Wilen went all the way to Tel Aviv, Israel, to find success on the gridiron. Wilen is a 2014 graduate of Lower Merion High School, where he played varsity football for 3 1/2 years. The Bulldogs had almost as many wins as coaches during Wilen's time with the team. New coaches arrived in Wilen's sophomore, junior and senior years. Lower Merion won three games his sophomore season and put up goose eggs in when he was a junior and a senior.
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