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SPORTS
November 21, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
ISTANBUL, Turkey - In Turkey, Allen Iverson has brought basketball to the masses. He has been welcomed by millions, embraced by a star-starved Istanbul as the star-crossed superstar that he once was - and hopes to one day become again. Visions of AI billboards (sipping a Turkish soda, perhaps?) dance in one's imagination. He is the fresh prince of this ancient city. This is reality . . . is it not? Not really. That depiction is distorted. On game night inside BJK Akatlar Arena - home court of Iverson's new team, the Besiktas Cola Turka Black Eagles - the image of Iverson hysteria is pure and true, but the arena seats 3,200 in a city of about 13 million.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
ISTANBUL - A suicide bomber detonated a bomb in the heart of Istanbul's historic districtyesterday, killing 10 foreigners - mostly German tourists - and wounding 15 other people in the latest in a string of attacks by the Islamic extremists targeting Westerners. The blast, just steps from the historic Blue Mosque and a former Byzantine church in the city's storied Sultanahmet district, was the first by ISIS to target Turkey's vital tourism sector, although terrorists have struck with deadly effect elsewhere in the country.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Deepti Hajela, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Relatives of a missing New York City woman who disappeared during a vacation to Turkey, her first trip outside the United States, are heading to Istanbul to look for her, her brother said Sunday. Sarai Sierra's family was last in touch with her last Monday, the day she was supposed to start her journey home. The 33-year-old mother of two had been in Turkey on her own since Jan. 7. Her brother, David Jimenez, told the Associated Press that he and Sierra's husband, Steven, were planning to leave for Turkey on Sunday night.
NEWS
October 5, 2004 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's midnight at Roxy, and a young, eclectic crowd is chatting and drinking under colorful lights as a diverse m?lange of rap, dance and pop thumps though giant speakers. There are long-haired guys with nose studs and tattooed women with bared midriffs. Beer and drinks are flowing. It could be any big city in the United States or Europe - but it happens to be the intellectual and cultural capital of the world's fifth-largest Muslim nation. If Turkey is indeed a European country - and many argue it is, even though at least 90 percent of its population lives in Anatolia, the Asian portion of Turkey that lies east of Istanbul - then Istanbul is the epicenter of its Europeanness, a potent symbol of its commitment to winning a place in the European Union as that organization's first Muslim member.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Elena Becatoros and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - The prime minister was meeting with antigovernment protesters early Friday, hours after giving them his "final warning" to end their occupation of a central Istanbul park that has become a flash point for the largest political crisis of his 10-year rule. If the talks break down, an eventual police intervention to clear Taksim Square's Gezi Park of the thousands of protesters who have been camping there for two weeks seemed increasingly likely. As Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan held talks in the capital, Ankara, Istanbul's governor hosted a midnight meeting with any protesters who cared to join him at a cafe near Taksim Square - vowing to consult with them "until the morning if necessary" on finding a solution to the Gezi Park sit-in.
TRAVEL
July 25, 2016
Answer: Ankara. Istanbul, the country's largest city, was the capital during the Byzantine and Ottoman empires and was called Constantinople until the early 1900s. Ankara was chosen as the capital of the republic in 1923.  
TRAVEL
September 18, 2011
Trying to save a buck? Here is ShermansTravel.com's list of the cities with the best free attractions. 1. Berlin 2. Buenos Aires 3. Chicago 4. Hong Kong 5. Istanbul 6. London 7. New York City 8. Rome 9. Seattle 10. Washington, D.C. - Houston Chronicle
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | Associated Press
ISTANBUL - Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Sunday it was his "duty" to order riot police to evict activists occupying an Istanbul park that became a center of defiance against his rule, even as the government crackdown continued across town with tear gas fired at protesters trying to regroup. In a thunderous speech to hundreds of thousands of supporters in western Istanbul, Erdogan also railed against foreign media coverage of the unrest amid criticism over his government's handling of the protests that left his international image battered, and exposed deep rifts within Turkish society.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | By Joy E. Stocke
Dawn came hot and clear last week in the Mediterranean resort town of Gocek, Turkey, a yachter's paradise of lapis and green water surrounded by pine-covered islands. My traveling companion Angie and I awoke well rested after having spent a grueling week in southeastern Turkey. We looked forward to a day on the beach with our friend Sakir before taking a flight the following morning to Istanbul, where we would catch up with a few acquaintances then head home. As the woman who poured our coffee spoke, we saw Sakir's face grow grim.
NEWS
May 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George F. Selhat, 93, of Jenkintown, a physician who practiced at Jeanes Hospital in Northeast Philadelphia for more than a half century, died Wednesday, May 14, of cancer at home. Born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, he moved to the United States in 1959. Dr. Selhat graduated from the University of Istanbul in 1952 with a medical degree. He served a residency in medicine at Jeanes Hospital from 1959 to 1963, and an internship in internal medicine at Hahnemann University Hospital in 1964.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 18, 2016
Makes 1 serving 1 cup plain whole-milk yogurt (may substitute Greek yogurt; see note) 1/2 teaspoon salt (optional) 1/2 cup cold water, or as needed 1. Combine the yogurt and salt, if using, in a deep bowl. Gradually whisk in the water, as needed, until the mixture is foamy on top. 2. Pour into a tall, chilled glass and serve right away. - From Istanbul food writer and culinary historian Nazli Piskin Note: If you use Greek yogurt, thin with a bit more water.
TRAVEL
July 25, 2016
Answer: Ankara. Istanbul, the country's largest city, was the capital during the Byzantine and Ottoman empires and was called Constantinople until the early 1900s. Ankara was chosen as the capital of the republic in 1923.  
NEWS
July 4, 2016
Barbie Zelizer is the Raymond Williams professor of communication and director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania Which places get reported on by journalists has always been a problem in the news. But Tuesday's attack at Istanbul's Ataturk Airport is a poignant reminder of how much U.S. journalism's uneven regard for places in the news undermines the public capacity to understand and respond to distant violence.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
ISTANBUL - A suicide bomber detonated a bomb in the heart of Istanbul's historic districtyesterday, killing 10 foreigners - mostly German tourists - and wounding 15 other people in the latest in a string of attacks by the Islamic extremists targeting Westerners. The blast, just steps from the historic Blue Mosque and a former Byzantine church in the city's storied Sultanahmet district, was the first by ISIS to target Turkey's vital tourism sector, although terrorists have struck with deadly effect elsewhere in the country.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2015 | By Sean Carney, For The Inquirer
On my second day in Paris, and the beginning of my 32d year, I stood among six or seven million skeletons as strangers sang "Happy Birthday" to me. There in the catacombs, 65 feet and 130 stone steps below the 14th arrondissement , I began my journey. It was last October, and Paris was the jumping-off point. From Gare L'Est, one of the city's oldest stations, I was to board the first of a series of trains that would take me across the waistline of Europe, tracing the original Orient Express through Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, and Turkey.
NEWS
May 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George F. Selhat, 93, of Jenkintown, a physician who practiced at Jeanes Hospital in Northeast Philadelphia for more than a half century, died Wednesday, May 14, of cancer at home. Born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, he moved to the United States in 1959. Dr. Selhat graduated from the University of Istanbul in 1952 with a medical degree. He served a residency in medicine at Jeanes Hospital from 1959 to 1963, and an internship in internal medicine at Hahnemann University Hospital in 1964.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Berza Simsek and Suzan Fraser, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Police fired volleys of tear gas at protesters who tried to enter a cordoned-off park near Istanbul's landmark Taksim Square on Saturday, hours after the city's governor warned the demonstration was illegal and participants would be dispersed. A few thousand people converged on the square, with the aim of entering Gezi Park, whose redevelopment plans sparked anger and morphed into nationwide antigovernment protests in June. Organizers had planned to serve notice to authorities of a court decision that has annulled redevelopment plans for Taksim and break through police cordons.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | Associated Press
ISTANBUL - Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Sunday it was his "duty" to order riot police to evict activists occupying an Istanbul park that became a center of defiance against his rule, even as the government crackdown continued across town with tear gas fired at protesters trying to regroup. In a thunderous speech to hundreds of thousands of supporters in western Istanbul, Erdogan also railed against foreign media coverage of the unrest amid criticism over his government's handling of the protests that left his international image battered, and exposed deep rifts within Turkish society.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Elena Becatoros and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - The prime minister was meeting with antigovernment protesters early Friday, hours after giving them his "final warning" to end their occupation of a central Istanbul park that has become a flash point for the largest political crisis of his 10-year rule. If the talks break down, an eventual police intervention to clear Taksim Square's Gezi Park of the thousands of protesters who have been camping there for two weeks seemed increasingly likely. As Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan held talks in the capital, Ankara, Istanbul's governor hosted a midnight meeting with any protesters who cared to join him at a cafe near Taksim Square - vowing to consult with them "until the morning if necessary" on finding a solution to the Gezi Park sit-in.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Elena Becatoros and Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
ISTANBUL - Turkey's government on Wednesday offered a first concrete gesture aimed at ending nearly two weeks of street protests, proposing a referendum on a development project in Istanbul that triggered demonstrations that have become the biggest challenge to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's 10-year tenure. Despite the offer, protesters continued to converge on Istanbul's Taksim Squire, the center for 13 days of repeated clashes between riot police firing tear gas, water cannons, and rubber bullets, and stone-throwing youths - an early sign the proposal hadn't defused the demonstrators' concerns.
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