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NEWS
May 27, 2011
Turkey suspects Kurds in bombing ISTANBUL, Turkey - A bomb mounted on a bicycle near a bus stop exploded during the morning rush hour in Istanbul on Thursday, wounding eight people, including a police officer. The government said the attack resembled a Kurdish rebel operation. Several ambulances rushed to the scene of the bombing on a multilane thoroughfare in a busy commercial area of Turkey's biggest city. Media reports said one woman lost a leg in the blast and another sustained severe burns.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson and Matt Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Standing at the historic gateway to the Muslim world, President Bush yesterday sought to assure Muslim nations that he does not want to force American-style democracy on them, as hundreds of protesters clashed with police nearby. In a speech to university students in Istanbul, Bush said Islamic countries should shape democracies that fit local cultural and religious values. He delivered his remarks the day after power shifted to an interim government in Iraq, but his focus was on a far more ambitious plan to spread democracy throughout the Middle East.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
With the Karachi and Istanbul atrocities, it's as if the horror movies on the late late show had moved over to Page One. But not even "The Chainsaw Massacre 1," which haunts the airwaves in the early A.M., could match the hideous spectacles of the Pan Am passengers mowed down as the lights went out and the shawled Jewish worshippers dying in a hail of lead in Istanbul. The late show you can turn off, but the dramas in the passenger cabin of Pan Am Flight 73 and the Neve Shalom synagogue have to play themselves out to the last bloody "reel.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The green hills of Asia roll up to the Bosporus straits, right to the edge of the European continent. Almost overnight, these slopes have succumbed to half-built brick shells and concrete pillars, future hovels for many of the nearly half-million newcomers crowding into Istanbul every year. And as these slums rise on Europe's doorstep, so, too, does a fervent Islamic movement flush with success. A political party that wants to remake Turkey into an Islamic state has just won the largest share of seats in the country's parliament, bringing down the government of Prime Minister Tansu Ciller.
FOOD
January 15, 2004 | By Beth D'Addono FOR THE INQUIRER
Every month or so, Center City resident Nursal Hicdonmez and her friends Yonca and Yasemin Agatan, who live in Ardmore, get together to cook a feast of home. All three women are from Turkey - Hicdonmez from the Aegean coastal town of Izmir and the Agatan sisters from Istanbul, for centuries the capital of the Ottoman Empire. Though it's been more than 15 years since they've lived in their native land, a meal of Turkish delicacies is all it takes to conjure the joys of their heritage.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Sonia Bowler FOR THE INQUIRER
I always wanted to explore Turkey, but when it came time to board my flight in October, I had a bad case of the blues. Lucky for me, the sights that awaited me and my group of Americans, Australians, and New Zealanders in Istanbul (capital of empires), Ephesus (a classical site with a wealth of spectacular ruins), and Cappadocia (unique cave cities and churches) changed all that. Who cannot be touched and awed by the Wall of Wishes near the Shrine of the Virgin Mary outside Ephesus?
NEWS
December 27, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Kenneth Headley, 89, of Paoli, a retired executive with Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co., died of complications from Parkinson's disease Wednesday, Dec. 7, at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Mr. Headley joined the accounting department at Provident MutualĀ in 1947. He became assistant controller in 1957 and eventually was appointed manager of electronic planning. He oversaw the installation of the company's first mainframe computers and helped design innovative business systems.
NEWS
June 27, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
President Bush won European support yesterday for his plan for more NATO involvement in Iraq and expressed confidence that "the bitter differences of the war are over" with European allies. But after meeting with leaders from the 25-nation European Union, Bush acknowledged that the United States' image had suffered abroad. Polls in Europe show widespread opposition to the Iraq war and pervasive disdain for Bush. Despite those differences, the European Union joined Bush in urging NATO to help train and equip Iraqi security forces so that they can replace U.S. occupation troops in Iraq.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2015 | By Sean Carney, For The Inquirer
On my second day in Paris, and the beginning of my 32d year, I stood among six or seven million skeletons as strangers sang "Happy Birthday" to me. There in the catacombs, 65 feet and 130 stone steps below the 14th arrondissement , I began my journey. It was last October, and Paris was the jumping-off point. From Gare L'Est, one of the city's oldest stations, I was to board the first of a series of trains that would take me across the waistline of Europe, tracing the original Orient Express through Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, and Turkey.
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