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Istanbul

NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Christopher Torchia, ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISTANBUL - A free political climate is essential to economic innovation, and countries that try to censor the Internet are pursuing a "dead end," U.S. Vice President Biden told a group of young entrepreneurs gathered in Istanbul on Saturday. The international forum, which drew hundreds of attendees, followed up on a meeting in Washington last year aimed at deepening ties between the United States and Muslim communities around the world. Biden said a political system based on freedom of speech and religion also is the "truest shield" against sectarian strife that has afflicted the Middle East, as well as western Europe in past centuries.
TRAVEL
September 18, 2011
Trying to save a buck? Here is ShermansTravel.com's list of the cities with the best free attractions. 1. Berlin 2. Buenos Aires 3. Chicago 4. Hong Kong 5. Istanbul 6. London 7. New York City 8. Rome 9. Seattle 10. Washington, D.C. - Houston Chronicle
NEWS
May 27, 2011
Turkey suspects Kurds in bombing ISTANBUL, Turkey - A bomb mounted on a bicycle near a bus stop exploded during the morning rush hour in Istanbul on Thursday, wounding eight people, including a police officer. The government said the attack resembled a Kurdish rebel operation. Several ambulances rushed to the scene of the bombing on a multilane thoroughfare in a busy commercial area of Turkey's biggest city. Media reports said one woman lost a leg in the blast and another sustained severe burns.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011 | By Dan Gross
A LLEN IVERSON is sure glad they have T.G.I. Friday's in Istanbul. The Sixers legend, a former regular at the Friday's on City Avenue, is now playing basketball in Turkey and told Philadelphia magazine's Robert Huber that he goes to Friday's in Istanbul daily. "Man, listen," he says. "I didn't know that the Philly cheesesteak wrap was that good when I was in Philly. I tried them when I got out here and every day since then. Every day since then," Iverson said. Huber asks Iverson, who used to lose big money regularly at Atlantic City's Trump Taj Mahal and Bally's, if he has a gambling problem.
SPORTS
November 21, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
ISTANBUL, Turkey - In Turkey, Allen Iverson has brought basketball to the masses. He has been welcomed by millions, embraced by a star-starved Istanbul as the star-crossed superstar that he once was - and hopes to one day become again. Visions of AI billboards (sipping a Turkish soda, perhaps?) dance in one's imagination. He is the fresh prince of this ancient city. This is reality . . . is it not? Not really. That depiction is distorted. On game night inside BJK Akatlar Arena - home court of Iverson's new team, the Besiktas Cola Turka Black Eagles - the image of Iverson hysteria is pure and true, but the arena seats 3,200 in a city of about 13 million.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010
No need to fly all the way to Turkey to catch Allen Iverson play basketball again, you can do it from the comfort of your home. NBA TV announced yesterday that it will televise the game featuring Iverson's Turkish team, Besiktas Cola Turka, tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. Iverson's team will face the defending TBL champion Fenerbahce Ulker from Istanbul. Calling the game for NBA TV will be Rick Kamla and Chris Webber. Iverson, who returned to the 76ers for 25 games last season before leaving the team because of his young daughter's illness, scored 15 points in his Turkey debut on Wednesday.
SPORTS
November 9, 2010 | By PHIL JASNER, jasnerp@phillynews.com
THE ANTICIPATION in Istanbul has been immense. Allen Iverson is coming. The news has been swirling for weeks. It does not seem to matter that Iverson is 35, that his best days are behind him, that he struggled last season in three games with the Memphis Grizzlies and 25 with the 76ers. All that matters is, Allen Iverson is coming. In true Iverson fashion, he was supposed to be there Saturday, to be greeted by throngs of people, to sign autographs, to be introduced to his new teammates with Besiktas.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Sonia Bowler FOR THE INQUIRER
I always wanted to explore Turkey, but when it came time to board my flight in October, I had a bad case of the blues. Lucky for me, the sights that awaited me and my group of Americans, Australians, and New Zealanders in Istanbul (capital of empires), Ephesus (a classical site with a wealth of spectacular ruins), and Cappadocia (unique cave cities and churches) changed all that. Who cannot be touched and awed by the Wall of Wishes near the Shrine of the Virgin Mary outside Ephesus?
NEWS
October 15, 2008 | By Trudy Rubin
Americans who explore the wonders of Istanbul rarely visit Turkey's capital, deep in the plains of Anatolia. It is a city of nondescript high-rises, government offices, and new shopping centers that reflect Turkey's growing prosperity. Ankara is known mainly for two things: a stunning museum that highlights Turkey's ancient Anatolian past, and the vast hilltop mausoleum of Ataturk, Turkey's founder, whose stern face is visible on huge banners throughout the city. But Ankara is becoming known for something else that's of great strategic interest to Americans: an active foreign policy that may help resolve conflicts in critical regions where the United States has faltered.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By Joy E. Stocke
Thursday, it was announced that Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk had won the 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature. When I interviewed Pamuk on the Columbia University Campus last year, rumors were circulating that he had been short-listed for the Nobel. But he was already focused on his new memoir, Istanbul: Memories and the City, which was still in galleys. The day before, an advance copy of Istanbul had helped me stay awake for the 11-hour flight home from that city. We'd originally been scheduled to meet at his flat overlooking the Bosphorus.
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