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Istanbul

NEWS
January 28, 1999 | By Andy Myer
Welcome, everybody! This is Wynnette Allcosts, here with Ly Cheatinsteel in Salt Lake City to bring you this medal round of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) site selection committee finals. This has been quite a spectacle, hasn't it, Ly? Ly: Unbelievable is the word, Wynn. This is the first year that Olympic site selection has actually been incorporated into the games as a demonstration sport, and the level of play has been exceptional. I should explain that each of the IOC contestants performs a site selection duty of his or her choice.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By Grace and Don Harrison, FOR THE INQUIRER
We've been to China, South Africa, all over Europe, as far east as Russia, and through our own continent. . . . But we'd never been on a cruise. We've been on trains from Prague to Budapest, Warsaw to Cracow, Hong Kong to Guangzhou, Johannesburg to Cape Town, Toronto to Vancouver. . . . We did go on a long ferry ride once - from Tallinn, Estonia, to Helsinki, Finland. . . . This was quite deliberate. From what we had been told, cruises were glitzy, overindulgent exercises in conspicuous consumption, focusing on casino gambling, embarrassing entertainment and wretched excess.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
I never expected that we would be temporarily adopted by three middle-aged Turkish hippies. But there we were, my friend and I, a bottle of red wine in one hand and a flashlight in the other, with one Turk beating a Syrian drum and another belting out Turkish folk songs, trekking up a rocky hill in the middle of the night. It was a pilgrimage, in the best pagan tradition, to see the eternal fires of Chimaeras that burn continuously on a mountain on Turkey's southern coast. A true travel adventure is about winding up in places - and with people - that you never could have imagined.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By William Ecenbarger, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even a skeptic like Mark Twain was enraptured upon seeing Istanbul from the sea - "a noble picture," he called it in Innocents Abroad, "by far the hand-som-est city we have seen. " Now, 128 years later, from the deck of the Radisson Diamond, the city on two continents still foists itself on the eye; it looks much the same - bulbous mosque domes, slender minarets, and the towers of Topkapi Palace silhouetted against a sky of fleecy white clouds, flushed pink with the dying day. From a distance, the only visible concessions to modernity are the yellow rivers of taxis on the streets and, on the roofs, satellite dishes eavesdropping on the world.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The green hills of Asia roll up to the Bosporus straits, right to the edge of the European continent. Almost overnight, these slopes have succumbed to half-built brick shells and concrete pillars, future hovels for many of the nearly half-million newcomers crowding into Istanbul every year. And as these slums rise on Europe's doorstep, so, too, does a fervent Islamic movement flush with success. A political party that wants to remake Turkey into an Islamic state has just won the largest share of seats in the country's parliament, bringing down the government of Prime Minister Tansu Ciller.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beyond the glass wall of the Galba Titus Room at Caesars Palace, the Strip was a silent showoff, spraying neon across the carnival sky. Past ersatz volcanoes and pirate ships, past no-wait marriage parlors and big names on big marquees (Paul Anka! Johnny Mathis!), the polyestered hordes chased the American dream to the next dollar slot. Inside, a couple of dozen earnest teenagers sat with their backs to the glitz. A slide projector hummed over tipsy music leaking in from a party nearby.
SPORTS
June 5, 1994 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are two kinds of American wrestlers at the Olympic level: those who exude quiet confidence and those who would rather shout down an opponent. Last night, the quiet confidence of Olympic champion Kevin Jackson of Team Foxcatcher won out over the brashness of U.S. Nationals champion Royce Alger in the finals of the John E. du Pont World Team Trials at Drexel. Jackson won a 4-3 decision over Alger in the final bout of a best-of-three series at 180.5 pounds. Earlier, Jackson won, 5-1, then lost by referee's decision in overtime after a 0-0 tie. "I told Alger after the match it's time he started to show some respect to me and others in this weight class," said Jackson, who snapped Alger's 22- match winning streak.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | By Jon Volkmer, FOR THE INQUIRER
One minute I'm in the teeming streets of Turkey's largest city with my wife, snacking on delicious street foods, and fending off the ubiquitous rug salesmen. Then, we turn into the doorway for Cemberlitas Turkish Baths, and walk down a flight of marble stairs and stand in a large room that is eerily quiet after the din of the streets. Across the room, with a couple of carpet-covered couches in between, half a dozen Turkish men dressed in towels look up expectantly. There is that sweet smell of Turkish tobacco in the air. One is drinking tea from a small, hourglass-shaped glass.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Starting this month, and once a month thereafter, you can travel the world without leaving home as guests of the Haddonfield Geographical Society. Mysterious Bali, land of legendary waters and holy mountains; New Zealand, a miniature cosmos with contrasting varieties of natural beauty; exotic Istanbul, a city that sits astride two continents, and scenic rural New England. What would it cost to visit all these places? Try $25. The Geographical Society is offering a special gift package for armchair travelers: two tickets to each of the four remaining shows on its schedule for $25. Tickets are normally $20 per person for the entire six-program series, so package subscribers will save $15. Here's the itinerary: Jan. 26 and 27 - Bali: Life in the Balance, with filmmaker Rick Ray. Feb. 9 and 10 - New Zealand: An Outdoor Adventure, with filmmaker Grant Foster.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The last people to see Tayfun Obut, 17, were his parents. It was a chance encounter about 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 1. Saliha and Fethi Obut, who do residential cleaning, were on their way to work. Their son, a junior and a soccer star at the Burlington County Institute of Technology in Medford, was supposed to be in class. They ran into him walking west on Route 70, just beyond the Medford Circle. He said he had a headache and was walking off the pain. They gave him $2 and took him to a McDonald's restaurant nearby.
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