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Istanbul

NEWS
October 17, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Onur Yilmaz went to Turkey last year to try to make an impression on one of the professional soccer clubs there. He left the country feeling fortunate to be alive. Now a senior at Delran, Yilmaz did not play high school soccer last season because he was chasing his professional dream. What he did not realize was that he was going to a country that would soon be ravaged by a devastating earthquake. On Aug. 8, 1999, Yilmaz traveled from the United States to Turkey, where he had spent part of his early childhood.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vernon, a cruise veteran from Texas whose last name I never learned, gave me the lowdown: "Some cruises are for relaxing. Some are for seeing things. "This one is definitely for seeing things. " Vernon delivered this brief cruise philosophy as we sat outside a roadside cafe in Corinth, Greece. We had just gotten off a tour bus to gape at the century-old Corinth canal, an engineering marvel that connects the Saronic Gulf and Aegean Sea, and were taking a 10-minute break before proceeding to the vast Roman ruins a few miles away.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | By Joy E. Stocke
Dawn came hot and clear last week in the Mediterranean resort town of Gocek, Turkey, a yachter's paradise of lapis and green water surrounded by pine-covered islands. My traveling companion Angie and I awoke well rested after having spent a grueling week in southeastern Turkey. We looked forward to a day on the beach with our friend Sakir before taking a flight the following morning to Istanbul, where we would catch up with a few acquaintances then head home. As the woman who poured our coffee spoke, we saw Sakir's face grow grim.
NEWS
August 18, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Turkey was digging the dead and the living out of the rubble yesterday after a massive earthquake devastated the most populated part of the country, toppling apartment buildings, tossing cars off roads, and collapsing highway overpasses. As of last night, the death toll was put at more than 2,000 and rapidly rising. An estimated 10,000 people were injured, and thousands more were missing. Turkish authorities said the quake measured 6.7 in magnitude, although geophysicists at the National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
You think you've got it bad? Not to make light of the subject - because the subject of Return With Honor is American POWs held captive during the Vietnam War. But watching the interviews and archival footage of the U.S. pilots shot down over North Vietnam and imprisoned for five, six, seven years, is to realize that the problems most of us have to contend with are puny by comparison. An emotionally explosive documentary, Return With Honor details the shoot-downs, captures, tortures and crushing isolation experienced by a group of top-flight Air Force officers.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | By Andy Myer
Welcome, everybody! This is Wynnette Allcosts, here with Ly Cheatinsteel in Salt Lake City to bring you this medal round of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) site selection committee finals. This has been quite a spectacle, hasn't it, Ly? Ly: Unbelievable is the word, Wynn. This is the first year that Olympic site selection has actually been incorporated into the games as a demonstration sport, and the level of play has been exceptional. I should explain that each of the IOC contestants performs a site selection duty of his or her choice.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By Grace and Don Harrison, FOR THE INQUIRER
We've been to China, South Africa, all over Europe, as far east as Russia, and through our own continent. . . . But we'd never been on a cruise. We've been on trains from Prague to Budapest, Warsaw to Cracow, Hong Kong to Guangzhou, Johannesburg to Cape Town, Toronto to Vancouver. . . . We did go on a long ferry ride once - from Tallinn, Estonia, to Helsinki, Finland. . . . This was quite deliberate. From what we had been told, cruises were glitzy, overindulgent exercises in conspicuous consumption, focusing on casino gambling, embarrassing entertainment and wretched excess.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
I never expected that we would be temporarily adopted by three middle-aged Turkish hippies. But there we were, my friend and I, a bottle of red wine in one hand and a flashlight in the other, with one Turk beating a Syrian drum and another belting out Turkish folk songs, trekking up a rocky hill in the middle of the night. It was a pilgrimage, in the best pagan tradition, to see the eternal fires of Chimaeras that burn continuously on a mountain on Turkey's southern coast. A true travel adventure is about winding up in places - and with people - that you never could have imagined.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By William Ecenbarger, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even a skeptic like Mark Twain was enraptured upon seeing Istanbul from the sea - "a noble picture," he called it in Innocents Abroad, "by far the hand-som-est city we have seen. " Now, 128 years later, from the deck of the Radisson Diamond, the city on two continents still foists itself on the eye; it looks much the same - bulbous mosque domes, slender minarets, and the towers of Topkapi Palace silhouetted against a sky of fleecy white clouds, flushed pink with the dying day. From a distance, the only visible concessions to modernity are the yellow rivers of taxis on the streets and, on the roofs, satellite dishes eavesdropping on the world.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The green hills of Asia roll up to the Bosporus straits, right to the edge of the European continent. Almost overnight, these slopes have succumbed to half-built brick shells and concrete pillars, future hovels for many of the nearly half-million newcomers crowding into Istanbul every year. And as these slums rise on Europe's doorstep, so, too, does a fervent Islamic movement flush with success. A political party that wants to remake Turkey into an Islamic state has just won the largest share of seats in the country's parliament, bringing down the government of Prime Minister Tansu Ciller.
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