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Italian Food

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NEWS
December 11, 1998 | by Lauralee Dobbins, For the Daily News
You might expect David Ortiz to favor restaurants that serve up food as spicy as the Latin jazz he plays every Saturday night on WRTI. But when he's dining out, which is often, this 40-year-old native Philadelphian and South Jersey resident chooses steak houses like the Outback or Steak 38, or Italian restaurants where the ambience and good food are conducive to relaxation. "Going out should be a soothing, relaxing experience," said Ortiz. "It's not just the food; you should be emotionally persuaded to come back.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Pasquale Passariello says his family opened its restaurant, Passariello Pavilion, downtown because he is in love with this town. And the 250 customers who buy food at his Main Street bistro daily feed his adoration. "I spend the money; the town will come in here and make me happy," he said. "They are a very, very nice community. I really love the people here. " And the people - including other business owners - appreciate his presence downtown. Customers arriving at or leaving the restaurant, at 13 W. Main St., often stop in at Signature Designs, a craft shop two doors away on Main Street, which is dominated by law and real estate offices.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | Michael Klein
Twenty years ago, Girasole on Locust Street just off 13th Street was the stylish go-to Italian spot for theatergoers. After it packed its tent in 2004 — it reopened in 2009 at Broad and Pine Streets — the space housed a series of sketchy nightspots. Now, with the neighborhood on the upswing — you have Fish on the opposite corner, Green Eggs Cafe next door, and a strip of hot restaurants around the corner (Sampan, Barbuzzo, Jamonera, Zavino, etc.) — the building is going the stylish Italian route again.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
TAKING A LITTLE TASTE of fun, Randi Cifelli, 4, of Blackwood, takes a bite of chocolate mousse at the Italian Market Festival in South Philadelphia. The festival yesterday featured live music, a greased-pole climbing contest and, of course, Italian food.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After serving as a teenage Army sergeant during World War II, Alfred Ciccotelli returned to South Philadelphia to help his parents run their grocery store at Seventh and Montrose Streets, two blocks east of the Italian Market. It was a modest-enough life that he lived above the store with his parents, who had emigrated from the regions of Abruzzi and Campania. But in 1963, he founded what has become the nationwide Italian food importer and distributor of Cento Fine Foods, headquartered in West Deptford, a firm that now employs more than 150 workers.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
A few McDonald's restaurants are spicing up their menus. And the move has some Italian restaurant owners in South Philadelphia steaming. Five McDonald's restaurants in Scranton are test-marketing Italian food. Customers who aren't in the mood for burgers and fries can order spaghetti, lasagna, tortellini or fettucini. Illinois-based McDonald's Corp. said it wanted to keep on top of the changing interests of its customers. "This is just one of many on-going things that we do, testing ideas so we can keep up with customers' changing tastes and lifestlyes," said company spokeswoman Judy Donaldson.
NEWS
April 25, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For most people, the meatball says it all. Red, round, and spicy, it symbolizes Italian food and culture for a lot of Americans. "You don't know the new Italy," lamented Giorgio Galanti, from Milan. "Americans are connected to the old country from years ago. You need some new suggestions about what Italy is today. " At Reading Terminal Market's first-ever Italian festival on Saturday, Galanti, a cultural officer with the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia, tried to convince people that his culture is more than chopped meat on a mound of pasta.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | By Teresa Banik, FOR THE INQUIRER
There are restaurants to suit every taste and budget in the Ithaca area. Here are a few local favorites, including a range of entree costs and phone numbers; reservations are suggested. Cabbagetown Cafe Popular vegetarian spot in Collegetown, right next to Cornell campus. Terrific homemade breads and soups. $5 to $10. 404 Eddy St. 607-273-2847. Centini's Coddington Restaurant Italian food with quiet atmosphere and windows overlooking lake. Seasonal outdoor dining in grape arbor gardens.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BEING THE daughter of Italian immigrants, Philomena Coppola Kelley knew how to cook Italian food, of course. But was she also expected to be able to build a patio by hand? This remarkable woman could do both. Whether rolling out her own pasta or mixing cement, Philomena was the expert. In addition, she raised four children and put them all through college, helped raise six grandchildren, lifted her beautiful singing voice in a church choir and liked to test her luck at bingo and Atlantic City casinos.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | By the Mystery Muncher, FOR THE INQUIRER
To the Muncher, the term "dribbling" means more than the sauce from a cheesesteak oozing down a chin. It also means Munch Madness, er, the basketball tournament known as March Madness. So when the women's teams from Penn State, the University of Connecticut, Rutgers and Tennessee duke it out at the First Union Center, the Muncher wants to cheer on a full stomach. One could dine at the First Union Center (options include $3.50 hot dogs, $3.25 fries and $5 individual pizzas), but one also might dine out before or after.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* LIDIA CELEBRATES AMERICA: FREEDOM AND INDEPENDENCE. 10 p.m. tomorrow, WHYY12.   LIDIA BASTIANICH knows how to party. In "Freedom and Independence," the latest installment of "Lidia Celebrates America," the chef, cookbook author and longtime PBS host brings viewers along for a trip that takes her from a Fourth of July naturalization ceremony at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello to the marking of Juneteenth - also known as Emancipation Day...
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After serving as a teenage Army sergeant during World War II, Alfred Ciccotelli returned to South Philadelphia to help his parents run their grocery store at Seventh and Montrose Streets, two blocks east of the Italian Market. It was a modest-enough life that he lived above the store with his parents, who had emigrated from the regions of Abruzzi and Campania. But in 1963, he founded what has become the nationwide Italian food importer and distributor of Cento Fine Foods, headquartered in West Deptford, a firm that now employs more than 150 workers.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
ROME - They twirled, they sniffed, they slurped, they chewed. The dozen homemakers who gathered at a Rome hotel on a recent afternoon took their work terribly seriously, rating plates of pasta for chewiness, saltiness, gumminess, or done-ness - that perfect balance known as al dente, or firm to the bite. Pasta is serious business in Italy, and the recent blind taste test by the world's biggest pasta-maker drove home that an awful lot of thought goes into making the simple combination of durum wheat semolina and water from which Italy's national dish is made.
NEWS
May 3, 2012 | Michael Klein
Twenty years ago, Girasole on Locust Street just off 13th Street was the stylish go-to Italian spot for theatergoers. After it packed its tent in 2004 — it reopened in 2009 at Broad and Pine Streets — the space housed a series of sketchy nightspots. Now, with the neighborhood on the upswing — you have Fish on the opposite corner, Green Eggs Cafe next door, and a strip of hot restaurants around the corner (Sampan, Barbuzzo, Jamonera, Zavino, etc.) — the building is going the stylish Italian route again.
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Angela, my Italian grandmother, defied stereotypes in the most disappointing way - she wasn't much of a cook. A first-generation American, she learned authentic Italian cooking from her mother, who hailed from the Abruzzi region of Italy. But good training didn't stop Angela from substituting waxy slices of American cheese for fresh mozzarella, if it was cheaper or easier. Depression-era anxiety and a meager family budget stalked her through the supermarket. And, though it was nearly unheard of in her Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood in the 1950s and '60s, she held down a full-time job while raising her family.
NEWS
June 17, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BEING THE daughter of Italian immigrants, Philomena Coppola Kelley knew how to cook Italian food, of course. But was she also expected to be able to build a patio by hand? This remarkable woman could do both. Whether rolling out her own pasta or mixing cement, Philomena was the expert. In addition, she raised four children and put them all through college, helped raise six grandchildren, lifted her beautiful singing voice in a church choir and liked to test her luck at bingo and Atlantic City casinos.
NEWS
April 25, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For most people, the meatball says it all. Red, round, and spicy, it symbolizes Italian food and culture for a lot of Americans. "You don't know the new Italy," lamented Giorgio Galanti, from Milan. "Americans are connected to the old country from years ago. You need some new suggestions about what Italy is today. " At Reading Terminal Market's first-ever Italian festival on Saturday, Galanti, a cultural officer with the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia, tried to convince people that his culture is more than chopped meat on a mound of pasta.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | By BILL WARD, Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Everybody loves Italian food, and this year it seemed as though most cookbook authors felt they owned a piece of it. Three of 2007's finest works on cucina Italiana bore near-identical titles: "[Given name]'s Italy. " 'Nuff said, clearly, especially since each of these works successfully captures the peninsula and its people as aptly as the zabaglione and zuppa di pesce. Lidia Bastianich, the engaging if slightly imperious TV host (check out her daughter Tanya's "not again, Mom" takes on their PBS shows; classic stuff)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
Pasta, pasta, bread, pizza and pasta. An Italian restaurant is a minefield for anyone with celiac disease, an autoimmune disease that destroys the lining of the small intestine when wheat gluten is ingested. Often misdiagnosed, celiac disease is estimated to affect about 2 million individuals. Also, many parents of children with autism and Asperger's syndrome have discovered eating a gluten-free diet is helpful. So, Pasquale Masters, Skip Elmer and John Fina added a gluten-free menu at their Voorhees, N.J. restaurant, Pasta Pomodoro.
NEWS
April 17, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
New Hope resembles a miniature San Francisco with its uneven streetscape and crooked roads. It has a similar countercultural feel, although in recent years, it has undergone its own kind of gentrification. Biker bars have become sports bar hangouts, and funky shops selling handmade candles and patchouli oil have given way to upscale stores selling designer jewelry or kitchenwares. Of course, the town still conveys that dated word funkiness - thank goodness. Among New Hope's dozens of eateries, Esca Restaurant & Bar might best reflect the mixed bag that is New Hope.
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