CollectionsItalian Immigrants
IN THE NEWS

Italian Immigrants

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2006
AS GENO'S owner Joseph Vento defends his right to refuse non-English speaking customers a cheesesteak, another grandson of Italian immigrants, Colorado Rep. Tom Tancredo, has asked President Bush to overturn the mandate requiring all government publications to be printed in a number of languages. Being a grandson of a Sicilian immigrant (who soon after his arrival here was drafted into the Army during World War I), I have taken a historic interest in studying the transition of Italian immigrants in the United States.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Chris Gray and Dan Hardy INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gennaro D'Aurizio's secret world, a three-acre verdant vegetable garden in Chester he carefully tended since 1956, lay hidden from the rest of Vauclain Street by a seven-foot wall of bushes. But the privacy didn't appease the 83-year-old Italian immigrant's sons, who begged him to stop returning to his old Sun Village neighborhood, a decaying block on the eastern side of the city. Not safe, they said. Just one more year, D'Aurizio replied. So every morning at around 7, the hobbyist would travel from Woodlyn to work for a few hours on his rows of peas and cabbages, tomatoes and eggplants.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
By Joseph V. Del Raso The recent public debate over whether to rename South Philadelphia's Italian Market has largely missed the point. There seems to be some confusion over what the name of the historic Ninth Street corridor of shops, restaurants, and curbside vendors means to Philadelphians who coined the moniker. Perhaps adding to the confusion is the fact that the Italians there traditionally have called it the Ninth Street Market. Granted, in recent decades, immigrant shopkeepers from countries other than Italy have found a home there, just as Italian immigrants have since the 1880s.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony F. Pinnie, 78, of Wallingford, an educator, a lawyer, a marathon runner, and a Mummer, died of pancreatic cancer Saturday, Aug. 14, at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. The son of Italian immigrants, Mr. Pinnie grew up in South Philadelphia and began marching with comic divisions in Mummers Parades when he was 16. He graduated from South Philadelphia High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Pennsylvania State University, where he played intramural football.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael DiPilla has a dream that's as big as the Colosseum and as alluring as the Mona Lisa: to build a national museum of Italian culture in Philadelphia. Not because the city has the largest number of Italians - that would be New York. But because Philadelphia and Italians go together like, well, pasta and gravy, and have since this country's beginnings. When George Washington's troops grew disheartened in the snows of Valley Forge, the general staged a production of Cato , a play about an Italian politician, to cheer them up. Ben Franklin taught himself to read Italian.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
He sailed for Asia, but landed in the Bahamas and later wound up shipwrecked in Jamaica. By all accounts, the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus never got as far north as Florida. But a memorial to the luckless sailor is going up at an unlikely site: Elmwood Park in Norristown. Representatives of the governments of Italy and Spain stood with local and state politicians and about 300 members of the borough's large Italian community yesterday, shivering through a groundbreaking for a stainless steel and marble monument to the Genoese sailor.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Frank Langfitt, Special to The Inquirer
Nicola DiMartino, 78, died at Bryn Mawr Hospital on Jan. 17. Mr. DiMartino was a retired landscaper who had lived in Bryn Mawr since 1968. Born in the town of Colledinacine in the Abruzzi region of Italy in 1908, Mr. DiMartino worked on his farm until he came to the United States in 1968. He worked for his brother's landscaping company, DiMartino and Son, in Bryn Mawr until he retired in 1974. According to his daughter, Luisa Ruggieri, Mr. DiMartino was 60 when he moved to the United States, and he was not sure he wanted to come.
NEWS
January 9, 2005 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Whitesbog is known as the place where the blueberry was first cultivated, when Elizabeth White began cross-breeding wild blueberries to produce plump, juicy fruit for market. The early-20th-century event made agricultural history and put the 3,000-acre cranberry and blueberry farm in the Pine Barrens on the map. Less known is the rich role Whitesbog played in the history of labor and ethnic relations in America. "Whitesbog was a culturally diverse place when that wasn't the norm.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Camden during the Depression, Inez Balestra Pontillo always had a sense of who she was: the only child of Italian immigrants. Like other immigrants who came to the United States to make a better life, her parents clung to their traditions and passed them on to their daughter. She lived in a predominantly Italian neighborhood, surrounded by extended family. Her parents spoke Italian at home; she learned English in grade school. The family belonged to an Italian parish and faithfully observed religious holidays.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
I THINK WE ARE heading in the right direction as far as not arresting people for small amounts of weed. But why does everything have to be about race? Yes, more white people smoke weed. But we tend to do it in the privacy of our own homes. Look around in the summer. In black neighborhoods you see blunt tobacco everywhere on the ground. In the parks, on people's own front steps, anywhere they feel like lighting up. They're doing it in full view of children (mostly their own) and even police.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
THE VERY FIRST words uttered by Pope Francis yesterday on his six-day U.S. journey that ends up here in Philadelphia were about immigration. That's not a surprise. The spiritual artist formerly known as Jorge Mario Bergoglio is himself the child of immigrants who fled from Italy, and the fascist regime of Benito Mussolini, for Argentina in the late 1920s, less than a decade before he was born. As pope, he's spoken eloquently of the plight of migrants - most recently from the fighting in Syria - and how human decency must be stronger than walls and fences.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF ANYBODY in the Gallo or Barone families needed information about current events, sports, medicine or any number of other subjects of interest, they didn't go to the library or the computer. They asked Grace. "Ask Aunt Grace," nephews and nieces would say. "She'll know about this. " And very often she did know, because Aunt Grace was a news junkie who not only kept up with what was going on in the world and the city, but also checked out the latest advances in medicine, and knew who was doing what to whom on the basketball courts, ice rinks and football gridirons.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael DiPilla has a dream that's as big as the Colosseum and as alluring as the Mona Lisa: to build a national museum of Italian culture in Philadelphia. Not because the city has the largest number of Italians - that would be New York. But because Philadelphia and Italians go together like, well, pasta and gravy, and have since this country's beginnings. When George Washington's troops grew disheartened in the snows of Valley Forge, the general staged a production of Cato , a play about an Italian politician, to cheer them up. Ben Franklin taught himself to read Italian.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
By Joseph V. Del Raso The recent public debate over whether to rename South Philadelphia's Italian Market has largely missed the point. There seems to be some confusion over what the name of the historic Ninth Street corridor of shops, restaurants, and curbside vendors means to Philadelphians who coined the moniker. Perhaps adding to the confusion is the fact that the Italians there traditionally have called it the Ninth Street Market. Granted, in recent decades, immigrant shopkeepers from countries other than Italy have found a home there, just as Italian immigrants have since the 1880s.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
I THINK WE ARE heading in the right direction as far as not arresting people for small amounts of weed. But why does everything have to be about race? Yes, more white people smoke weed. But we tend to do it in the privacy of our own homes. Look around in the summer. In black neighborhoods you see blunt tobacco everywhere on the ground. In the parks, on people's own front steps, anywhere they feel like lighting up. They're doing it in full view of children (mostly their own) and even police.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IT'S TIME to rename the not-so-Italian "Italian Market. " Hear me out. I'm not trying to slaughter one of Philly's sacred cows here. But the name of the market just doesn't reflect the reality of the street. I mean, have you been on South 9th Street lately? Bachata music spilling out of Paco Records. Kids playing outside one of the street's numerous taquerias, switching from English to Spanish to Spanglish. Signs in all kinds of Asian languages on the window of Hai Tao Hair salon.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank E. LaVerghetta, 79, of Ardmore, a Philadelphia-raised electrical engineer and pioneer of early computer technology, died Thursday, Jan. 10, at Lankenau Hospital from complications of heart disease. Mr. LaVerghetta worked for 18 years for Philco and its successor, Philco-Ford Corp. In the 1950s with a group of engineers, he developed a transistorized computer, according to his brother-in-law, Robert Smargiassi. Mr. LaVerghetta was developing the computer as part of a bombing system to be used by the military, Smargiassi said.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Brigandi Sr. found more than one way to serve the people of Glassboro. The first was academic; the second, gastronomic. During 24 years on the Glassboro Board of Education, the last six as president, Mr. Brigandi was a force behind several nationally validated reading and writing programs in the 2,300-student district. He was pivotal in getting a grade school built. And he negotiated teachers' and administrators' contracts. But there was another post he held nearly twice as long - behind the counter at Joe's Sub Shop.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis A. Biunno, 87, formerly of Wallingford, a retired Common Pleas Court judge in Philadelphia, died of complications from dementia Friday, Nov. 30, at Riddle Village, a retirement community in Media. Before retiring in 1994, Judge Biunno presided over numerous criminal cases in his 20 years on the bench. Among the more heinous cases were those of a Fishtown man found guilty of setting fire to an abandoned rowhouse in which a firefighter died; a man who shot a high school student for her gold earrings; and the rape and stabbing of an 85-year-old woman.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
MARY D. PUSHAW was so proud of her Italian heritage, she became fluent in the language, studied the culture, cooked the food and made numerous trips to Italy. She also was active in a number of organizations in the Philadelphia area devoted to Italian heritage and culture. Mary, a real-estate associate who was born Mary De Francesco to Italian immigrants, a patron of the arts and a gourmet cook, died suddenly on Tuesday. She was 81 and lived in Havertown. "Family defined a large part of Mary's life," her family said, "and [she]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|