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NEWS
June 19, 2006
AS GENO'S owner Joseph Vento defends his right to refuse non-English speaking customers a cheesesteak, another grandson of Italian immigrants, Colorado Rep. Tom Tancredo, has asked President Bush to overturn the mandate requiring all government publications to be printed in a number of languages. Being a grandson of a Sicilian immigrant (who soon after his arrival here was drafted into the Army during World War I), I have taken a historic interest in studying the transition of Italian immigrants in the United States.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As president of Il Circolo Italiano of the Main Line, Joe Tatta is dedicated to promoting everything Italian in this corner of Pennsylvania. The club, which meets monthly, offers programs about Italian culture, Italian language classes and, of course, Italian food. "It's a very, very nice group of people, very cordial," Tatta said. Il Circolo was founded about 15 years ago and now has about 170 members. Recent programs include a presentation by the author of an Italian-English dictionary, a talk by local author Lisa Scottoline, and lectures by local college professors about arts and books.
NEWS
May 10, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In a wave of fear that swept the nation as World II got under way, some 600,000 Italian-born Americans were classified as "enemy aliens" by the U.S. government. Some were deported. Some were forced into internment camps similar to those to which Japanese-Americans on the West Coast were "relocated" at the same time. All were fingerprinted and required to give up radios with short-wave bands. In some cases, flashlights were confiscated because they might be used "to signal the enemy.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all Philadelphia's claims of being an "international city," the last of its once-grand corps of European diplomats almost pulled out last year. World diplomacy is shifting to the vast cities of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Aging nations need to make new trade ties in those places. Canada shut its Philly consulate in 2012. Italy was ready to do the same. But the Italians stayed. Advocates argued that the country, with its flat economy and crushing bureaucracy - and a commitment to change all that from energetic Prime Minister Matteo Renzi , 39 - needs friends and trade partners, and can find more here by updating old ties to the big Italian American communities.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ST. NICHOLAS of Tolentine Parish has something that no other church in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has: a weekly Sunday Mass conducted in Italian. The 8 a.m. Mass helps some congregants connect with their Italian heritage, said the Rev. Nicholas F. Martorano, pastor of St. Nicholas since 1984. "They like the tradition. They want to keep the language. They just enjoy being able to celebrate the Mass with the Italian language even though they speak English," Martorano said.
FOOD
January 4, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
Worried retailers of French Brie, Dutch Gouda, fine brandies and other gourmet items have become key players in a U.S. trade spat with Europe, and they now fear that huge price increases will cripple sales of popular products. "I think it's going to be terrible. . . . It's going to be devastating to us," said Murray Klein, president of Zabar's in Manhattan, which caters to exotic tastes in food. "Ninety-eight percent of our cheese is imported. You can't stock up. It's perishable.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vincenza Alberti was waxing poetic about yesterday's Columbus Day Parade as she watched the passersby from a folding chair in Marconi Plaza. But she sized up the event in a way that would have sent shudders through an Italophile. "I was just telling my aunt, this is a chance to see everybody - all your neighbors, people you don't get a chance to see," Alberti, 52, said from the festive park at Broad and Oregon Streets in South Philadelphia. "You get to see people on the other side of Broad Street that, maybe, you haven't seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
If you call Carrabba's Italian Grill and are placed on hold, you'll hear a recording of someone speaking in Italian and then in English. "Buona sera. Good evening. Quanti? How many are you?" A bit of an Italian lesson, explains Steve Groshardt, who manages the restaurant in Turnersville, Gloucester County. Well, I didn't gain much knowledge of the Italian language during the short time I was on hold, but at the restaurant I learned that Carrabba's is a fine family-style place where they overwhelm you with huge portions of food - most of which is rather good.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Falcone, the 72-year-old treasurer of the West Chester chapter of the Sons of Italy, says Italian Americans have come a long way since the days when he was a 17-year-old in the borough and was blackballed from a local fire company because of his heritage. Although ethnic stereotypes are crumbling - "it used to be if they heard you were Italian, everyone thought you were packing a gun. . . . now, there are Italian American judges all over the state" - Falcone says there is still a need to celebrate tradition and family.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
MARY D. PUSHAW was so proud of her Italian heritage, she became fluent in the language, studied the culture, cooked the food and made numerous trips to Italy. She also was active in a number of organizations in the Philadelphia area devoted to Italian heritage and culture. Mary, a real-estate associate who was born Mary De Francesco to Italian immigrants, a patron of the arts and a gourmet cook, died suddenly on Tuesday. She was 81 and lived in Havertown. "Family defined a large part of Mary's life," her family said, "and [she]
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NEWS
April 20, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
ST. NICHOLAS of Tolentine Parish has something that no other church in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has: a weekly Sunday Mass conducted in Italian. The 8 a.m. Mass helps some congregants connect with their Italian heritage, said the Rev. Nicholas F. Martorano, pastor of St. Nicholas since 1984. "They like the tradition. They want to keep the language. They just enjoy being able to celebrate the Mass with the Italian language even though they speak English," Martorano said.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For all Philadelphia's claims of being an "international city," the last of its once-grand corps of European diplomats almost pulled out last year. World diplomacy is shifting to the vast cities of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Aging nations need to make new trade ties in those places. Canada shut its Philly consulate in 2012. Italy was ready to do the same. But the Italians stayed. Advocates argued that the country, with its flat economy and crushing bureaucracy - and a commitment to change all that from energetic Prime Minister Matteo Renzi , 39 - needs friends and trade partners, and can find more here by updating old ties to the big Italian American communities.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
MARY D. PUSHAW was so proud of her Italian heritage, she became fluent in the language, studied the culture, cooked the food and made numerous trips to Italy. She also was active in a number of organizations in the Philadelphia area devoted to Italian heritage and culture. Mary, a real-estate associate who was born Mary De Francesco to Italian immigrants, a patron of the arts and a gourmet cook, died suddenly on Tuesday. She was 81 and lived in Havertown. "Family defined a large part of Mary's life," her family said, "and [she]
FOOD
May 5, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, For The Inquirer
Giuseppina Carrara is what they refer to in Italy as a buongustaio - literally a "good taster. " "She loves to eat," says chef Jeff Michaud, speaking of his Italian mother-in-law, whose home cooking inspires many of his dishes at Osteria. "She's not into the dainty. When I put the francobolli on the table [at Osteria], she says, 'Come on Jeffrey. I want a plate of pasta, so give me a plate of pasta,' " says Michaud, chef partner at Osteria. Michaud, 33, met Carrara in 2004 about a month after he started dating her daughter Claudia, a bella donna with big brown eyes who walked into the restaurant where he was cooking in Bergamo, Italy.
NEWS
January 17, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The people at Bryn Athyn College went straight to hell yesterday. It was just before 1:30 on a beautiful afternoon at the leafy Montgomery County campus, and by sometime early this morning, they planned to be well out. They would be - if they could swing it - awash in the love that moves the sun and all the other stars. Paradise. Traveling in a single day from the depth of Point A to the pinnacle of Point B, allowing for a layover in purgatory, was an undertaking apparently never before attempted in the United States.
NEWS
June 19, 2006
AS GENO'S owner Joseph Vento defends his right to refuse non-English speaking customers a cheesesteak, another grandson of Italian immigrants, Colorado Rep. Tom Tancredo, has asked President Bush to overturn the mandate requiring all government publications to be printed in a number of languages. Being a grandson of a Sicilian immigrant (who soon after his arrival here was drafted into the Army during World War I), I have taken a historic interest in studying the transition of Italian immigrants in the United States.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As president of Il Circolo Italiano of the Main Line, Joe Tatta is dedicated to promoting everything Italian in this corner of Pennsylvania. The club, which meets monthly, offers programs about Italian culture, Italian language classes and, of course, Italian food. "It's a very, very nice group of people, very cordial," Tatta said. Il Circolo was founded about 15 years ago and now has about 170 members. Recent programs include a presentation by the author of an Italian-English dictionary, a talk by local author Lisa Scottoline, and lectures by local college professors about arts and books.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There's a place you can go to "chat, chew the fat, shoot the breeze, sling the bull, babble, cackle, chatter, gab, yak, yammer. " So says the Web site of Meetup, a nonpartisan entity that uses cyberspace to set up live meetings of people with similar interests, especially politics. The place may be your local coffee shop, a tavern, a restaurant, a meeting room at a catering hall, or another hangout. There, during an intense election season, you can vent with people of the same political persuasion or debate those with slightly different views.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Falcone, the 72-year-old treasurer of the West Chester chapter of the Sons of Italy, says Italian Americans have come a long way since the days when he was a 17-year-old in the borough and was blackballed from a local fire company because of his heritage. Although ethnic stereotypes are crumbling - "it used to be if they heard you were Italian, everyone thought you were packing a gun. . . . now, there are Italian American judges all over the state" - Falcone says there is still a need to celebrate tradition and family.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vincenza Alberti was waxing poetic about yesterday's Columbus Day Parade as she watched the passersby from a folding chair in Marconi Plaza. But she sized up the event in a way that would have sent shudders through an Italophile. "I was just telling my aunt, this is a chance to see everybody - all your neighbors, people you don't get a chance to see," Alberti, 52, said from the festive park at Broad and Oregon Streets in South Philadelphia. "You get to see people on the other side of Broad Street that, maybe, you haven't seen.
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