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Italian Wines

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NEWS
April 13, 1986 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
A number of liquor store owners in New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland have decided not to remove Italian wines from their shelves, and yesterday many criticized the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (LCB) for banning the sale of Italian wines. Many wine retailers, wholesalers and importers say there is no evidence that any of the methanol-contaminated wine that has killed 22 people in Italy in recent weeks has reached the United States. Tests by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms have so far shown no methanol contamination of wines imported from Italy, but the agency last week advised Americans to temporarily refrain from drinking Italian wine "as a precautionary measure.
NEWS
April 12, 1986 | By Walter F. Naedele and Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board ordered State Stores yesterday to halt the sale of Italian wines in the wake of 22 deaths in Italy since early March of people who drank contaminated wine. The Italian Health Ministry said yesterday that more than 300 Italian wines had been found to contain illegal amounts of methanol, a potentially deadly chemical. The LCB said no Italian wines would be sold in State Stores until tests are completed next week to ensure the absence of contamination.
FOOD
April 3, 1988 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, Special to The Inquirer
"In Italy, everyone makes their own wine. We're brought up with it," explained Luca Sena as he poured a glass of his vintage 1986 homemade wine, a rich golden liquid that he calls Luca's First in honor of his 10-year-old son's winemaking debut. "Here, it's so sad," he said with a sigh. "The kids miss out on it. " Sena Sr., 38, grew up in Naples, where winemaking is a family affair. He credits his grandfather with instilling in him a love of wine. "My grandfather used to make a nice white wine, like a sweet white zinfandel.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
As Italy's wine scandal claimed its 21st victim, the U.S. government said yesterday that it would embargo any Italian wine imports lacking certification that they are not contaminated with methanol. In Turin, Italian Premier Bettino Craxi convened his cabinet to approve measures designed to "provide better consumer protection and restore credibility to the Italian product," according to an official communique. Doctors in Turin said that Maria Pellegrino, 58, died after having been in a coma since March 21. She is the 21st person to die from drinking cheap table wine laced with methyl alcohol, added to increase the wine's alcohol content.
FOOD
October 25, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Bagels and lox and Long Island duck breast? What a combination. Such is the new Murray's Main Line Deli and bistro M , which opened earlier this month at 575 Lancaster in Berwyn (610-644-1010). Bob and Gayle Teti - who previously had a Murray's in West Chester - have set up a service deli/grocery on one side and a modern/industrial-look dining room on the other, in what was the old Berwyn Ice House. There's a parking garage and curbside service, too. At breakfast and lunch, traditional deli items (sandwiches, smoked fish, omelettes)
FOOD
April 26, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Rioja region comes into its own The Roman soldiers who colonized the Mediterranean followed, whenever they could, the rivers that led inland from the sea. The river valleys provided fingers of warmer climate as they moved into colder, continental uplands, and the rivers themselves often provided the easiest way to move men and materiel. In what would later be Spain, as they penetrated along the river Ebro, they found a broad valley sheltered from Atlantic winds by mountains to the north.
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Three hours into dinner with the entree yet to be served, David Doelp leaned back in his chair, took a sip of Brunello di Montalcino - the eighth vintage poured at the table - and reflected. "How much more enjoyable this is than stuffing your face in 19.4 minutes," he mused, alluding to the grab-and-gulp meals that have become standard fare for many Americans, especially young people. "When I have dinner with my grandchildren, I tell them it's dinnertime and they have to sit down," Doelp continued.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
America's young and affluent drinkers, with their growing taste for fine chardonnays and bordeauxs, are profoundly altering the domestic wine industry - threatening to do for some of the nation's biggest wineries what foreign imports did for automakers and steel producers. They are abandoning cheap, generic wines in favor of more expensive, premium wines that come not in green gallon jugs but in 750-milliliter bottles with tony labels and double-digit price tags. "I hesitate to call them yuppies . . . but we are seeing an increasing sophistication of the consumer," said Robert Lieber, the chief negotiator for the 12-member Winery Employers Association that last week won pay cuts and other concessions from striking winery workers.
FOOD
October 21, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Contemporary Italian cooking comes attired in traditional dress in Elisa Celli's Italian Light Cooking (Prentice-Hall, $19.95), a book as savory and appetizing as the cucina Italiana it describes. Celli, author of the best-selling The Pasta Diet, continues her delicious approach by debunking the myth that Italian cooking is, by necessity, calorie- laden. When executed properly, it is high in fiber and low in fats and cholesterol. The book has a straightforward approach and yet manages to give the reader more insight into its subject in two paragraphs than some books are able to accomplish in two pages.
FOOD
June 13, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Dave Magrogan will expand his empire further. He is taking over what briefly was Square Peg at 10th and Walnut Streets; he is not sure yet of the new concept - only that it will open "later in the year. " He also is preparing to take over Firecreek , the steak house in a 200-year-old refurbished paper mill on the banks of the Brandywine in Downingtown. Its last day is likely early next week around June 17, according to management. Magrogan (Doc Magrogan's, Kildare's, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar)
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FOOD
June 13, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Dave Magrogan will expand his empire further. He is taking over what briefly was Square Peg at 10th and Walnut Streets; he is not sure yet of the new concept - only that it will open "later in the year. " He also is preparing to take over Firecreek , the steak house in a 200-year-old refurbished paper mill on the banks of the Brandywine in Downingtown. Its last day is likely early next week around June 17, according to management. Magrogan (Doc Magrogan's, Kildare's, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar)
FOOD
October 25, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Bagels and lox and Long Island duck breast? What a combination. Such is the new Murray's Main Line Deli and bistro M , which opened earlier this month at 575 Lancaster in Berwyn (610-644-1010). Bob and Gayle Teti - who previously had a Murray's in West Chester - have set up a service deli/grocery on one side and a modern/industrial-look dining room on the other, in what was the old Berwyn Ice House. There's a parking garage and curbside service, too. At breakfast and lunch, traditional deli items (sandwiches, smoked fish, omelettes)
BUSINESS
February 13, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For eight years, Moore Bros. Wine Co. did a brisk business selling a 12-bottle mixed case of French, German and Italian wines for $100. That price is history. A 35 percent decline in the value of the dollar vs. the euro since 2002 made the promotion unsustainable, said Gregory Moore, president of the Pennsauken wine retailer. "You can't lose a little bit on every sale and make it up on volume," Moore said. The price for the mixed case, which comes in a special box with tasting notes and anecdotes about the wine-makers, increased to $125 at the end of January; Moore Bros.
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Three hours into dinner with the entree yet to be served, David Doelp leaned back in his chair, took a sip of Brunello di Montalcino - the eighth vintage poured at the table - and reflected. "How much more enjoyable this is than stuffing your face in 19.4 minutes," he mused, alluding to the grab-and-gulp meals that have become standard fare for many Americans, especially young people. "When I have dinner with my grandchildren, I tell them it's dinnertime and they have to sit down," Doelp continued.
FOOD
April 26, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Rioja region comes into its own The Roman soldiers who colonized the Mediterranean followed, whenever they could, the rivers that led inland from the sea. The river valleys provided fingers of warmer climate as they moved into colder, continental uplands, and the rivers themselves often provided the easiest way to move men and materiel. In what would later be Spain, as they penetrated along the river Ebro, they found a broad valley sheltered from Atlantic winds by mountains to the north.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art's programs on Wednesday nights, now going into its third year, have turned out to be one of the town's most popular attractions, and no wonder. Where else can you go for a film, performances of music and dance, story- telling, poetry-reading, sometimes wine- and beer-tasting, talks by experts on a feature of one of the world's finest art collections, plus the chance to meet someone you know, or maybe someone you don't know, all for the price of admission ($6 for adults, $3 for seniors and students)
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Ruth E. Gruber, Special to The Inquirer
It's a blazing hot day and you've been sightseeing since early morning. The fiery Italian sun beats down almost sadistically and the streets are an oven as you move from the Forum to the Pantheon to the Vatican to the Trevi Fountain. You're hot, you're tired, your feet hurt and you're still a little jet-lagged. Most of all, you're thirsty. You don't want a coffee and even mineral water doesn't quite do the trick; the idea of wine under the merciless sun makes your head ache. You want something refreshing, cool, bubbly and maybe just a little intoxicating.
FOOD
April 3, 1988 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, Special to The Inquirer
"In Italy, everyone makes their own wine. We're brought up with it," explained Luca Sena as he poured a glass of his vintage 1986 homemade wine, a rich golden liquid that he calls Luca's First in honor of his 10-year-old son's winemaking debut. "Here, it's so sad," he said with a sigh. "The kids miss out on it. " Sena Sr., 38, grew up in Naples, where winemaking is a family affair. He credits his grandfather with instilling in him a love of wine. "My grandfather used to make a nice white wine, like a sweet white zinfandel.
FOOD
October 21, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Contemporary Italian cooking comes attired in traditional dress in Elisa Celli's Italian Light Cooking (Prentice-Hall, $19.95), a book as savory and appetizing as the cucina Italiana it describes. Celli, author of the best-selling The Pasta Diet, continues her delicious approach by debunking the myth that Italian cooking is, by necessity, calorie- laden. When executed properly, it is high in fiber and low in fats and cholesterol. The book has a straightforward approach and yet manages to give the reader more insight into its subject in two paragraphs than some books are able to accomplish in two pages.
NEWS
October 5, 1986 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
America's young and affluent drinkers, with their growing taste for fine chardonnays and bordeauxs, are profoundly altering the domestic wine industry - threatening to do for some of the nation's biggest wineries what foreign imports did for automakers and steel producers. They are abandoning cheap, generic wines in favor of more expensive, premium wines that come not in green gallon jugs but in 750-milliliter bottles with tony labels and double-digit price tags. "I hesitate to call them yuppies . . . but we are seeing an increasing sophistication of the consumer," said Robert Lieber, the chief negotiator for the 12-member Winery Employers Association that last week won pay cuts and other concessions from striking winery workers.
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