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NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Arthur Caplan
Twenty-five years ago, one of the most revolutionary events in the history of humankind took place - a little girl named Louise Brown was born. The world's first "test-tube" baby arrived amid a storm of protest. Many in the then-emerging field of bioethics, such as Leon Kass - who is today the chair of President Bush's Council on Bioethics - argued that creating people by means of in vitro fertilization - mixing sperm and eggs in a glass dish (test tubes were never actually used)
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Andee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Brigit Barry, 30, and Michael Cottone, 33, of Broomall THE CHILD: Vincent (Vin) Kai Barry-Cottone, adopted April 27, 2016 WHO PROPOSED TO WHOM: After three years of dating, Brigit said, "Let's go to the ring store. " The new house, the one on which they'd just closed, reeked of smoke. Water pooled in the basement. Firefighters had punched holes in the back in order to fight a smoldering blaze that began when a faulty heat lamp in the bathroom ignited fibers from stripped wallpaper.
NEWS
October 20, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Does in vitro fertilization harm children's health? Infertility researchers offered a mostly reassuring answer yesterday, but with caveats. On one hand, there appears to be no connection between IVF and developmental problems, cancer, deformities, or overall health difficulties, based on studies of children up to age 8. On the other hand, IVF dramatically raises the risk of multiple births, which in turn is linked to prematurity with all its complications. And even singleton IVF babies are twice as likely to be born prematurely, underweight, and die within a week as babies conceived naturally, the researchers concluded.
NEWS
August 2, 2003
Louise Brown turned 25 last week. From all appearances, Brown, a postal worker in Bristol, England, is a woman as normal as her name. But that name forever will be associated with a turning-point in human history. Thanks to in vitro fertilization (IVF), she was the first person whose conception took place outside the body, and hers was the first successful IVF birth. Twenty-five years later, IVF has helped give life and happiness to many thousands. That is a great triumph.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a technical explanation of a high-tech procedure to produce that miracle of life - a baby. Yet it all boiled down to a very simple question. After a while, one of the men in the group asked, "What's the success rate?" The nurse-practitioner conducting the informational session about in-vitro fertilization told the group that the pregnancy rate was around 20 percent. That question - just what is the success rate? - is being asked with increasing frequency as the demand grows for in-vitro fertilization, a technique in which eggs and sperm are combined in the laboratory and the fertilized eggs are then transferred to the womb.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Too many women give up on in vitro fertilization too soon, a new study suggests. After analyzing more than 250,000 in vitro fertilization attempts by more than 150,000 women over nearly a decade, researchers found that women could keep increasing their chances of having a live birth through up to nine IVF cycles, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. What's more, the researchers defined an IVF cycle more expansively. Instead of considering each attempt to transfer one or more embryos into the womb as an individual cycle, study authors counted each attempt to stimulate the ovaries and retrieve eggs as the beginning of a new cycle.
NEWS
July 9, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Should health insurance cover infertility treatment? Infertile couples and their doctors certainly think so. As science has pushed the boundaries of reproduction, they have lobbied for coverage of all treatment, including in vitro fertilization, the expensive, high-tech procedure that brings egg and sperm together in a lab dish. Last week, there was new ammunition for their lobbying efforts from a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. A team of researchers concluded that if more women used in vitro fertilization (IVF)
NEWS
January 7, 2002
Conception is not a commodity People who have heard me criticize New Jersey's new law requiring insurance ratepayers to subsidize infertility treatments question how I could oppose such wonder technologies as in-vitro fertilization. I respond that to deem artificial conception good because it produces a baby that a parent wants is akin to building one's dream house above a sacred burial ground or an amusement park on a hallowed battlefield. Assisted-conception advocates should consider the following: Assisted conception entails the buying and selling of life.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the McCaughey septuplets were born in 1997, critics were quick to question the quality of the treatment that led to such a dangerous multiple pregnancy. The second-guessing intensified with the births of the Chukwu octuplets a year later. But a new study suggests that the increasingly common problem of triplets or greater is unavoidable when fertility drugs are used to force the ovaries to ripen many eggs at once, as in these world-famous cases. Even when doctors carefully follow standard guidelines for ovulation induction, about 9 percent of women will have so-called high-order multiples, according to research conducted at the Center for Human Reproduction in New York and Chicago.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Asian and African American women are less likely to be successful with in vitro fertilization than white or Hispanic women, new research shows. The reasons for the disparity are not clear, but the effect of race was as significant as aging on fertility, according to two studies presented yesterday at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine convention in Philadelphia. In other words, a 35-year-old Asian or black woman had the same chance of delivering an IVF baby as a 40-year-old white or Hispanic woman - about 20 percent.
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NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Andee Hochman
THE PARENTS: Brigit Barry, 30, and Michael Cottone, 33, of Broomall THE CHILD: Vincent (Vin) Kai Barry-Cottone, adopted April 27, 2016 WHO PROPOSED TO WHOM: After three years of dating, Brigit said, "Let's go to the ring store. " The new house, the one on which they'd just closed, reeked of smoke. Water pooled in the basement. Firefighters had punched holes in the back in order to fight a smoldering blaze that began when a faulty heat lamp in the bathroom ignited fibers from stripped wallpaper.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
THE PARENTS: Karen Meshkov, 37, and Matt Pillischer, 37, of Wyncote THE CHILD: Asa Janos Pillischer, adopted Feb. 18, 2016 LENGTH OF TIME BETWEEN KAREN'S FIRST PHONE CALL TO ADOPTIONS WITH LOVE AND THE SECOND, "GOOD NEWS" CALL: Two hours After the second failed IVF attempt, after the bill that was twice what they'd anticipated because the first try ended in an ectopic pregnancy that required two surgeries, Karen and Matt decided to...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
One pregnancy loss - especially at 15 weeks, when her profile had already begun to bulge and the ultrasound images looked like an actual baby - felt like crushingly bad luck. But a second miscarriage - at seven weeks, when scans showed a fetal pole but no heartbeat - left Kim and Jared shaken, saddened, and wondering whether they would ever be able to carry a baby to term. "I was completely naive to the fact that we could have another loss," Kim says. "I thought: Is this coincidence or horrible luck?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I'm in the middle of a messy divorce, six months after my son - conceived after years of IVF - died at birth. I've also just started a new job with a lot more responsibility, and am living in temporary accommodations since my soon-to-be-ex is in the marital home. I'm constantly either furious or in deep, black grief. It's exhausting. My counselor says I need to take better care of myself. I agree, but I don't know how. If I take some time off, or go on vacation, or treat myself, it won't change the reality - my son will still be dead, and my marriage will still have collapsed.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Too many women give up on in vitro fertilization too soon, a new study suggests. After analyzing more than 250,000 in vitro fertilization attempts by more than 150,000 women over nearly a decade, researchers found that women could keep increasing their chances of having a live birth through up to nine IVF cycles, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. What's more, the researchers defined an IVF cycle more expansively. Instead of considering each attempt to transfer one or more embryos into the womb as an individual cycle, study authors counted each attempt to stimulate the ovaries and retrieve eggs as the beginning of a new cycle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Only the most twisted algorithm would have put these two together: She was a city girl, a blond, blue-eyed extrovert, raised by a philosopher and a hippie. He was a dark-haired, taciturn traditionalist who grew up in the suburbs. But Nora had just a month left in her Match.com subscription and, with a string of disappointing dates behind her, she paused on Sam's profile. "I was thinking, 'What do I have to lose?' " The two met for a picnic in Valley Green, followed by a long hike.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WHEN Patrick and Shannon Marie Frasca of Bensalem saw the story of their battle with infertility told on the Internet for the world to see, they felt embarrassed. But it didn't take long for the couple, who grew up in Northeast Philadelphia, to come around. An outpouring of support swelled quickly in the form of encouraging messages and donations popping up on GoFundMe.com, a crowdfunding website where Shannon's sister, Jeannine Roach, 21, published their story. And any hesitation about publicly sharing their struggle melted away.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most comprehensive analysis of the health-care costs of multiple births is a real (sticker) shock. When the pregnant woman's prenatal care and the babies' care through the first year are included, a single birth costs $21,458, compared with $104,831 for twins and $407,199 for triplets or more, according to a new study of insurance claims in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. That means twins cost five times as much as single births, and higher multiples cost 19 times as much.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writertakiffj@phillynews.com
IF EVERYONE'S favorite young royals, Kate and William, used a sophisticated, made-in-Britain fertility tracker to help conceive Prince George of Cambridge, Shamus Husheer isn't telling. "They'd probably have bought the device under a false name," said the likewise Cambridge (University)-connected co-inventor of DuoFertility, perhaps the most practical piece of wearable, digital health electronics we've stumbled on since, well, forever. "And of course, even if the royal couple do have it, our confidentiality agreement would prevent us from telling you," added the good doc. Spawned in the U.K. in 2009, DuoFertility has significantly improved its profile in the past two years.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
D EAR ABBY: My husband and I are the proud parents of beautiful 4-year-old twins. After years of infertility, we found out that my husband has a low sperm count. Additionally, I have very few eggs. Ultimately, we conceived our miracles with IVF and the help of a sperm donor. We do not want to keep this a secret from our children. However, we understand that once the dialogue with our children begins, others will naturally find out. My husband still feels very uncomfortable discussing his condition.
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