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Jackie

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NEWS
July 17, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Several months ago Jackie, 31, became fed up with being alone and dating only "pathological liars who say they have a small place of their own and really live with their parents. " So the 31-year-old bartender from Bristol decided to join Sweet Beginnings, a dating service in Langhorne. Jackie, who describes herself as "very marketable," said she likes both jazz and fishing and is looking for "someone stable who is not frightened by the idea of getting married. " With an estimated 70 million single people over the age of 18 in the United States, Jackie, who asked that her last name not be used, is hardly alone out in the dating world.
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | By CAMILLE PAGLIA
The death of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis inspired testimonials of love and respect across all divisions of social class and political party. She was the most famous woman in the world in a long period following that of the great stars of old Hollywood and preceding that of our own pop princesses, Diana and Madonna. Why? Merely as a paragon of high fashion and elegant good taste, Jackie could not have retained the affection of millions over a span of several decades. It was her baptism by gunfire that deified her. Her extraordinary behavior during and after the assassination of her husband gave her a permanent place in history.
NEWS
June 9, 2009 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
FORGET RAHM Emanuel. Ditch David Axelrod. Ignore Valerie Jarrett. Just focus on Desiree Rogers. Desiree Glapion Rogers is the White House social secretary, and she's a lot more fun to look at than Emanuel, Axelrod or Jarrett. I know because I'm looking at a photo of her. Of Creole heritage, she's a cool New Orleans native with a Harvard MBA who made her mark both in corporate America and the rough and tumble world of Chicago politics. Rogers is the "eyes and ears" of first lady Michelle Obama.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Byko's birthday book Manayunk state rep Kathy Manderino votes 39. Hey, it was the '70s. All the beautiful people were painting New York red and indulging in tawdry one-night stands. Why wouldn't Frank Sinatra and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis be among them? The two legendary celebs spent a night together in September 1975, according to "Sinatra: Behind the Legend," a dishy and probably unverifiable new account of the singer's life. No Sinatra family spokesperson could be reached for comment yesterday.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 14, Jackie already floated high most days. "Whether I was happy, sad, mad - it didn't matter what my feelings were - when I got up in the morning, I needed to get high," she said. "It was the first thing I thought of. " From the time she was in elementary school, drugs dominated her life. For that high, she did almost anything, went almost anywhere. Her habits took her from her small-town home in Brownsville, N.J., to Northeast Philadelphia and as far away as California.
SPORTS
March 16, 1999 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jackie deMarteleire has been defined over the years as Mike's younger sister, daughter of the coach, or niece and granddaughter in the first family of Lansdale Catholic athletics, the Algeos. She expects someday soon simply to be Jackie, but she isn't in a rush to abandon those other aspects of her identity. "There is always time for that," deMarteleire said. "In college, I'll just be me. In high school, I think I've had a competitive edge to prove something, that I was a good athlete myself.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few weeks, Philadelphia-based investigative reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely has received international attention for her Rolling Stone article "A Rape on Campus," telling of the gang rape of a student, identified only as "Jackie," at a fraternity party at the University of Virginia. On Friday, after a series of news reports questioned Erdely's work, Rolling Stone issued an apology citing unspecified discrepancies in the story. "Because of the sensitive nature of Jackie's story," the magazine's managing editor, Will Dana, wrote, "we decided to honor her request not to contact the man she claimed orchestrated the attack on her, nor any of the men she claimed participated in the attack, for fear of retaliation against her. ... "There now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account, and we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced," the statement read.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / SCOTT ROWAN
STEELWORKERS AND MANAGEMENT PRAY in Coatesville, seeking to end a strike against Lukens Inc. Praying yesterday were (from left) Al Fulco, Lukens human resources director; Jackie and Jack Frye, treasurer of Local 1165, and Harry Haines, local president.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1990 | By Bill Kent, Special to the Daily News
Maybe it was the rain that hadn't yet fallen, the half-empty moon hanging low over the Atlantic, or the fact that the summer season was lurching to its sad, sunburned end on Long Beach Island. But on this off night downashore, the dim, triple-bar Cypress Room of Crane's Surf City Hotel was up and bumping. At least 500 folks were hooting, hollering, blathering along as Paul "Presto" Pestritto and Jack "Jackie V" Vitale careened about the Cypress Room's center bar and broke into "that immortal Italian classic, 'Whatsamatta U!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2011 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there For years, Jackie's friend Casey had told hilarious stories about her friend Tom and their teenage high jinks as counselors at a New Jersey YMCA camp. So in spring 2007, when Casey invited Jackie to join her and Tom at a Phillies game, Jackie couldn't resist. "I remember thinking when we were in the parking lot that he was very cute," said Jackie, then a nursing student at the University of Pennsylvania. Tom liked what he saw, too. They had an almost instant rapport.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
There's a certain type of American man who never changes and never disappears. Often overlooked, and even looked down upon, he nonetheless degrades himself in humiliating jobs to support his family while clinging to dreams of wealth and fame. On television, this man has appeared by many names: Al Bundy, Homer Simpson, Fred Flintstone, and Ralph Kramden. The latter finds life on stage as Scottie (Scott Greer) in 1812 Productions' To the Moon. Jen Childs and her creative team wrote To the Moon as an homage to the comedy style of Jackie Gleason, with Greer standing in for The Honeymooners star in a number of respects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* NURSE JACKIE. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime.   JACKIE Peyton's life is spinning out of control, and there's nothing funny about that to Edie Falco, the woman who plays Showtime's drug-addicted "Nurse Jackie. " "My experience with addiction, people I love, that I've worried about and stuff," is that it goes the way it's gone for Jackie, said Falco, in an interview in January to talk about the show's final season, which begins Sunday with her character in jail. "I mean, how many times have I said, or have I heard people say, 'Isn't it enough?
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I'M NOT READY to say that Jackie , the subject of an explosive Rolling Stone story about a gang rape at a University of Virginia fraternity in 2012, lied. Mostly because, based on everything I've read including some supposed hazy recollections on the part of a traumatized young woman, I don't think she did. What I am ready to say is that by agreeing not to contact Jackie's assailants, and then running full speed from the backlash, Rolling Stone broke one of the most important ethical oaths in journalism: Do no harm.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few weeks, Philadelphia-based investigative reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely has received international attention for her Rolling Stone article "A Rape on Campus," telling of the gang rape of a student, identified only as "Jackie," at a fraternity party at the University of Virginia. On Friday, after a series of news reports questioned Erdely's work, Rolling Stone issued an apology citing unspecified discrepancies in the story. "Because of the sensitive nature of Jackie's story," the magazine's managing editor, Will Dana, wrote, "we decided to honor her request not to contact the man she claimed orchestrated the attack on her, nor any of the men she claimed participated in the attack, for fear of retaliation against her. ... "There now appear to be discrepancies in Jackie's account, and we have come to the conclusion that our trust in her was misplaced," the statement read.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2014
I HAVE ALWAYS been a fan of Jackie Joyner-Kersee for her accomplishments on and off the field. She smoked the track-and-field circuit for 13 years, winning three gold, one silver and two bronze medals in four Olympic Games. She was crowned Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th Century by Sports Illustrated for Women magazine. She's also an author, having detailed her struggles and triumphs in her autobiography, A Kind of Grace . Friday, the down-to-earth star will speak about "Running the Race with Grace and Humility On and Off the Track" at West Chester University.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers goalie Steve Mason handed Jackie Lithgow his stick Tuesday. Wayne Simmonds wrapped his arm around the 19-year-old and gave him encouraging words. Several players, including Mark Streit, Brayden Schenn, and Michael Del Zotto, and coach Craig Berube told Lithgow he was welcome to visit the locker room anytime. "Epic," Lithgow said in a low, barely audible tone while sitting in a wheelchair in the middle of the locker room at the team's Voorhees practice facility. Lithgow was attending Bloomsburg University when he was assaulted almost nine months ago. He left the hospital Tuesday for the first time since his grueling rehabilitation began.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In 1990, Jackie was a member of the inaugural Temple Diamond Gems Dance Team. Her favorite part of practice: seeing Alan, a student athletic trainer. She soon was looking for excuses to hang out in the athletic training room. "I thought he was adorable," Jackie says of Alan. "And him being an athletic trainer, I could see how caring, how professional, and how mature for his age he was. " Alan noticed Jackie when she came looking for athletic tape to help keep her uniform where it ought to be. They became friends.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
FATHER JUDGE'S baseball team will pay tribute to Jackie Robinson today and Wednesday when the Crusaders play games against Roman Catholic. The Judge players will wear T-shirts with the No. 42 during warmups. They'll then don the shirts under their jerseys during the games. Judge athletic director Jim Lynch came up with the idea. Traditionally, major league teams honor Robinson, the first black major league player, on April 15. That was the day in 1947 that he broke the color barrier by starting at first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers against the visiting Boston Braves.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JACQUELINE DeSANCTIS worked at the Bridesburg Recreation Center for 45 years, retired in 2005, immediately returned as a volunteer and has continued to be its full-time heart and soul ever since. "I don't think anyone ever told her to leave her office," said Joseph Slabinski III, owner of Slabinski Funeral Home of Bridesburg, who was master of ceremonies recently when city officials renamed a block of Richmond Street in front of the rec center, "Miss Jackie's Way. " "Who is going to kick her out?"
SPORTS
August 9, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IT WAS MOST likely Tuesday night or early Wednesday morning when a hater or haters decided to deface the statue of Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese that stands outside MCU Park in Coney Island, home to the Brooklyn Cyclones, the Mets' Class A team. According to 1010 WINS in New York, swastikas and racial slurs were painted on the statue, which commemorates one of the sport's special moments. In May 1947, the year Robinson became the first black player in Major League Baseball, Reese, who was white, silenced a taunting, hostile crowd in Cincinnati by putting his arm around Robinson.
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