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Jackie Mason

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1994 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The world according to Jackie Mason goes something like this: On affirmative action: "The only person you can fire today is a tall, white, Protestant, American gentile. " On feminism: "A lot of women are belligerent . . . especially those who haven't had a date in nine years. " On the effects of TV violence: Television is full of cooking shows - "Did it make one Jewish woman here start cooking?" On President Clinton: "He's the first guy who makes Nixon look honest.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters, the Orlando (Fla.) Sentinel and USA Today
Jackie Mason resigned yesterday as an adviser to New York GOP mayoral candidate Rudolph Giuliani after remarks he made about the Democratic candidate, David Dinkins, blacks and Jews were published in yesterday's Village Voice, a Big Apple weekly. The star of TV's Chicken Soup was quoted as saying that "Dinkins looks like a black model without a job" and that if he "was white and you put his track record against Giuliani's track record he wouldn't get a single Jewish vote. " The comedian added: "All you have to do is be black and don't curse the Jews directly and the Jew will vote for a black in a second.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you go directly to your washing machine, flip on the spin cycle, and follow the swift WIZ-a-wiz-a, WIZ-a-wiz-a the washer pounds out, you'll be hearing the neck-breaking beat of comedian Jackie Mason. It rivals the rap rhythm of any hip-hop artist. He may, at age 73, be the last Borscht Belt-style comedian still performing, and he works his Judeo-centric act like a man 20 years younger - and at the highest-end venues. Jackie Mason Freshly Squeezed opened here Wednesday night at the Academy of Music; it will hit New York in March - his seventh Broadway one-man show.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Now you would think that with all the brouhaha over his racial remarks during the New York City mayoral campaign, comedian Jackie Mason would stay as far away from politics as he could. But nnnnnnnooooooooooo. Mason is set to host a lunch at Manhattan's trendy Elaine's restaurant on Dec. 8 in honor of Pennsylvania Republican Sen. Arlen Specter. You might expect that Specter would distance himself from the comedian, who was cut loose from the mayoral campaign of Republican Rudolph Giuliani in September after saying that Jews would vote for black candidates out of guilt.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | By BILL KENT, Special to the Daily News
"Singers . . . " Jackie Mason sighs. "I'm not interested in many singers. They don't do much for me. " Ah, but Mason is interested in singing, or, more accurately, the haunting, modal melodies that more typically waft around the balconies of Orthodox synagogues, instead of a Manhattan coffee shop at 6 p.m. "I could sit forever in a coffee shop, doing nothing, maybe doing a little talking, a little singing. A Jew, can't do 'nothing.' It's the hardest thing in the world. You can't just sit. "If a Jew sits and does nothing, he's a bum. So he has to be doing something all the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Jackie Mason makes an apt choice in closing Jackie Mason - Prune Danish with a caricature of Ed Sullivan that's pitch-perfect, down to the voice, the hunched shoulders, and that paranoid Nixon stare. It was on Sullivan's show almost 40 years ago that Mason derailed his then-flourishing career by making an ill-advised rude gesture with his finger. In the best moments of Prune Danish, the digit remains defiantly raised at the the world and its countless lunacies. Eighteen years ago, Mason revived his career with his solo outing in The World According to Me, which won a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"It's a thrill to be in such a stunning place," says Jackie Mason at the outset of his new show, Much Ado About Everything, at the Theatre of Living Arts. He's not serious, of course; the seedy TLA is a far cry from the cozy, handsomely appointed Booth Theatre in New York, where his last show, Love Thy Neighbor, closed just 11 days ago. Doesn't this man ever take a vacation? Probably not, judging from what he has to say about vacations. Mason hasn't much use for all those Caribbean islands with the French names - or, come to that, for the French.
LIVING
May 11, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters, the New York Daily News, the New York Post and USA Today
But seriously, folks, Jackie Mason is running for public office. He announced yesterday as an independent candidate for New York City's $105,000- a-year Office of Public Advocate, a post to be vacant as soon as incumbent Andrew Stein officially becomes a mayoral candidate. "To say a comedian doesn't know the difference between something serious and comedy is like saying . . . a dancer will start dancing in the middle of a funeral," said Mason, 59. "I know the difference between comedy and seriousness, and if I'm going to tell jokes I'd be on stage on Broadway.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even with his shoes off, his shirt out and a warm corned beef sandwich in his hands, Jackie Mason was sick to his stomach. Miserable even. He was, to use the comic's own gift for understatement, a sensation, insanely successful with audiences, but not yet "the astronomical star" he deserved to be. He was "trying to find a different way to create a new level of international stardom" and was not sure Broadway would work. But then Leonard Bernstein said: "Jackie Mason's got the virtuosity of a Vladimir Horowitz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oy! Lunch with Jackie Mason, the stand-up comedian not known for his restraint, can give you a massive case of indigestion. Jackie Mason arrives at the Brooklyn Diner, a little late, but serene, surrounded by a small entourage that includes a manager (long hair, moustache, diamond stud earring), a comedian named Nancy and, believe it or not, his rabbi, who by coincidence was having lunch there, but is happy to interrupt his meal and deliver an impromptu, pro-Jackie testimonial ("the man's got a heart of gold")
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The first question that arises at the prospect of comedian Martin Short sharing the stage with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra on Sunday is: What will he do? The possibilities are wide. Maybe his faux-sentimental "Al-Qaeda's Rose" - an Osama bin Laden version of "Candle in the Wind" - for symphony orchestra? A Mann Center-sized multimedia version of "Rehab," his song about Hollywood stars in recovery? So improvisationally oriented is this Canadian-born veteran of Second City TV that he'll follow no strict script at 8 p.m. Sunday at the Mann, in an evening titled "Three Singular Sensations" with Short, composer/conductor Marvin Hamlisch, and Broadway leading man Brian Stokes Mitchell.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
The PC story of the week is a controversy surrounding a world-renowned surgeon who resigned a leadership position in the face of criticism over a one-liner he delivered concerning semen. Until last week, Lazar Greenfield was the president-elect of the American College of Surgeons. He invented the Greenfield Filter, a device that has saved countless lives by preventing blood clots during surgery. He's a professor emeritus of surgery at the University of Michigan. He has written more than 360 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals, 128 book chapters, and two textbooks.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
It could have been a rock concert for the laid-back set. On stage at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater Feb. 6, Jon Kabat-Zinn played to a rapturous sellout crowd, there to absorb, even be transformed by, his prescription of hope for a troubled world. Kabat-Zinn, 64, is the country's meditator-in-chief, the molecular biologist who introduced mindful meditation to traditional medicine back in 1979 and who, through the next three decades, ushered it into the medical mainstream.
NEWS
October 18, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Morris "Moe" Shames, 89, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired shoe-store-chain manager and theatrical booking agent, died Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. For more than 60 years, Mr. Shames booked entertainers for events at synagogues and for local fund-raisers, and engaged talent for Atlantic City casinos and resorts in the Poconos and elsewhere. He was known from Connecticut to Florida, his son Stuart said. He worked with a whole generation of entertainers, including comics Jackie Mason and Henny Youngman, his son said, and more recently booked impressionist Marilyn Michaels and was negotiating to book comedienne Joy Behar, cohost of ABC's The View, for a local fund-raiser.
NEWS
August 27, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comedy vet Jackie Mason, 75, has filed a $2 mil lawsuit against Jews for Jesus for using his name and image in one of the org's pamphlets. Filed in New York state Supreme Court in Manhattan, the suit seeks the destruction of the pamphlet, which has an image of Mason next to the words "Jackie Mason . . . A Jew for Jesus!?" The pamphlet, which plays with Mason's shoulder-shrugging question-asking shtick, expounds on the similarities between Judaism and Christianity. "While I have the utmost respect for people who practice the Christian faith . . . I am as Jewish as a matzo ball or kosher salami," Mason said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2004 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you go directly to your washing machine, flip on the spin cycle, and follow the swift WIZ-a-wiz-a, WIZ-a-wiz-a the washer pounds out, you'll be hearing the neck-breaking beat of comedian Jackie Mason. It rivals the rap rhythm of any hip-hop artist. He may, at age 73, be the last Borscht Belt-style comedian still performing, and he works his Judeo-centric act like a man 20 years younger - and at the highest-end venues. Jackie Mason Freshly Squeezed opened here Wednesday night at the Academy of Music; it will hit New York in March - his seventh Broadway one-man show.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
West Catholic's Kneshia Sheard was as excited about stepping onto the track just minutes after her idol Marion Jones as she was about sprinting across the finish line in first place. Sheard anchored West Catholic's 4x100-meter relay team to a first-place finish in the Tri-State area race yesterday, the final day of the Penn Relays. The Burrs ran a time of 47.60 seconds, beating East Orange, N.J., which was clocked in 48.03. "Marion Jones ran the anchor and won, too," Sheard said, referring to the American sprinter's win in the women's Olympic Development 4x100 race.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Kevin Kline puts on pounds and padding to play Falstaff in Henry IV, Ellen Burstyn ages many years to star in the adaptation of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All, and Boy George adds who-knows-what in Taboo. The Broadway season has some of the usual predictability, but also a promising diversity. Some of the new musicals are decidedly offbeat in theme, and unlike last year, when there were hardly enough candidates to fill out the Tony nominations category, new plays are pleasingly present - which means that producers are more willing to take a chance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Jackie Mason makes an apt choice in closing Jackie Mason - Prune Danish with a caricature of Ed Sullivan that's pitch-perfect, down to the voice, the hunched shoulders, and that paranoid Nixon stare. It was on Sullivan's show almost 40 years ago that Mason derailed his then-flourishing career by making an ill-advised rude gesture with his finger. In the best moments of Prune Danish, the digit remains defiantly raised at the the world and its countless lunacies. Eighteen years ago, Mason revived his career with his solo outing in The World According to Me, which won a Tony.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sheldon Weintraub was always the life of the household, his wife, Marjorie, says. "He's always been the entertainer in the family. I do dishes. He does fun. " So it was only fitting that after an eye injury permanently sidelined him from practicing podiatry, Weintraub, 66, found a second career in comedy. I took care of Santa Claus once. He had a bad case of mistletoe. Foot jokes are part of Weintraub's schtick, of course, and he makes liberal reference to tofu and fillet of sole and other parts of his favorite human appendage in the five-minute routine he has been honing for use in stand-up clubs.
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