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Jackie Robinson Day

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SPORTS
March 4, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Jackie Robinson will be honored every April 15 by Major League Baseball, starting with a national celebration at Shea Stadium paying tribute to the Hall of Famer's legacy. Commissioner Bud Selig announced Jackie Robinson Day yesterday, saying "we are further ensuring that the incredible contributions and sacrifices he made - for baseball and society - will not be forgotten. " Robinson will be honored each year at all major league ballparks hosting a game on April 15, the anniversary of the date he broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 with Brooklyn.
SPORTS
April 16, 2004 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillies outfielder Doug Glanville called Jackie Robinson a great American story. There's no question about that. It is why the Phillies celebrated Jackie Robinson Day yesterday with five Negro leagues players from the Philadelphia Stars: Harold Gould, Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn, Wilmer Harris and Bill Cash. On April 15, 1947, Robinson integrated baseball in the modern era when he made his debut for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He retired after the 1956 season and was 53 when he died of a heart attack in 1972.
SPORTS
April 15, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Today is Jackie Robinson Day throughout Major League Baseball. To honor the famed Brooklyn Dodgers infielder's breaking of baseball's color barrier 60 years ago today, the Phillies and visiting Houston Astros will salute Robinson most vividly at Citizens Bank Park. All uniformed personnel will wear jerseys with 42, Robinson's number, which was retired throughout the game 10 years ago. The Phillies will mark the anniversary in other ways before the 1:35 p.m. game. They include: A salute to Bill Cash, Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn and Harold Gould, the four living members of the Philadelphia Stars, the Negro league team that played here from 1934 to 1950 and won the 1934 Negro National League pennant.
SPORTS
April 16, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a good time to reflect on what's great about sports and athletics - how we are lifted up and reminded of the better part of our nature. So runners can challenge themselves to run 26.2 miles and we gather to cheer their acomplishment - and no murderous act, for whatever addled motive, can do anything other than redouble our appreciation and strengthen the resolve to strive for our best. So a baseball player can change his society by playing the game at the highest athletic standard, while gracefully dealing with racist vitriol and disparagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Say what you will about pipsqueak pop star Justin Bieber , but the kid is expanding his horizons. While in Amsterdam this weekend, he stopped by the Anne Frank House museum. It's the actual house in which Frank wrote her famous Diary while the adolescent and her family hid in the cramped attic to escape Nazi persecution during World War II. As a certified pop idol, Bieber knows a thing or two about teenage girls. "Truly inspiring to be able to come here," he wrote in the museum's guest book.
SPORTS
April 24, 2007 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty years and eight days after Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier, the Phillies got their chance to honor not only a pioneer but also an era. The team was rained out in its first attempt to celebrate the Brooklyn Dodgers great on Jackie Robinson Day on April 15. The Phillies conducted a pregame ceremony last night with the four surviving members of the Philadelphia Stars, whose players preceded Robinson in the Negro leagues....
SPORTS
March 31, 1997 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Change is never easy. But when it is successful, it is a good reason for celebration. So all across the county this year, in every major league ballpark, there will be a reminder that this is the 50th anniversary of the year that Jackie Robinson helped bring change to baseball. In Philadelphia, the reminder will be located in the middle of Veterans Stadium. As part of the Phillies' tribute to Robinson, a commemorative disk will be fitted into the centerfield turf and remain there throughout the season.
SPORTS
April 14, 2007 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins and Florida Marlins lefthander Dontrelle Willis have a great appreciation for Jackie Robinson. Like countless other major leaguers, the two Oakland, Calif., products will proudly wear Robinson's No. 42 tomorrow as part of baseball's nationwide Jackie Robinson Day salute. Rollins and Willis share more than admiration of the man who broke the sport's color barrier 60 years ago tomorrow. The two Encinal High School grads also feel a responsibility to help increase the flow of black players like themselves into the game, as each explained in separate interviews recently: Question: What would you tell an African American kid who asks: Why should I play baseball?
SPORTS
April 14, 2007 | By Todd Zolecki, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins and Florida Marlins lefthander Dontrelle Willis have a great appreciation for Jackie Robinson. Like countless other major leaguers, the two Oakland, Calif., products will proudly wear Robinson's No. 42 tomorrow as part of baseball's nationwide Jackie Robinson Day salute. Rollins and Willis share more than admiration of the man who broke the sport's color barrier 60 years ago tomorrow. The two Encinal High School grads also feel a responsibility to help increase the flow of black players like themselves into the game, as each explained in separate interviews recently: Read other stories in this series, view historical photos and listen to audio slide shows at http://go.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST Thursday was a storybook day for baseball at Citizens Bank Park. The sun was shining and the temperature hit 75 as the Phillies prepared to host the Nationals in the late afternoon. During the pregame festivities, our National League champs received their commemorative rings. And when it came time for the national anthem, several Tuskegee Airmen stood at home plate and saluted. It was also Jackie Robinson Day, which explained the presence of several wheelchair-using members of the Philadelphia Stars, the old Negro League team.
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SPORTS
April 16, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a good time to reflect on what's great about sports and athletics - how we are lifted up and reminded of the better part of our nature. So runners can challenge themselves to run 26.2 miles and we gather to cheer their acomplishment - and no murderous act, for whatever addled motive, can do anything other than redouble our appreciation and strengthen the resolve to strive for our best. So a baseball player can change his society by playing the game at the highest athletic standard, while gracefully dealing with racist vitriol and disparagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Say what you will about pipsqueak pop star Justin Bieber , but the kid is expanding his horizons. While in Amsterdam this weekend, he stopped by the Anne Frank House museum. It's the actual house in which Frank wrote her famous Diary while the adolescent and her family hid in the cramped attic to escape Nazi persecution during World War II. As a certified pop idol, Bieber knows a thing or two about teenage girls. "Truly inspiring to be able to come here," he wrote in the museum's guest book.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
LAST Thursday was a storybook day for baseball at Citizens Bank Park. The sun was shining and the temperature hit 75 as the Phillies prepared to host the Nationals in the late afternoon. During the pregame festivities, our National League champs received their commemorative rings. And when it came time for the national anthem, several Tuskegee Airmen stood at home plate and saluted. It was also Jackie Robinson Day, which explained the presence of several wheelchair-using members of the Philadelphia Stars, the old Negro League team.
SPORTS
April 24, 2007 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty years and eight days after Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier, the Phillies got their chance to honor not only a pioneer but also an era. The team was rained out in its first attempt to celebrate the Brooklyn Dodgers great on Jackie Robinson Day on April 15. The Phillies conducted a pregame ceremony last night with the four surviving members of the Philadelphia Stars, whose players preceded Robinson in the Negro leagues....
SPORTS
April 15, 2007 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Today is Jackie Robinson Day throughout Major League Baseball. To honor the famed Brooklyn Dodgers infielder's breaking of baseball's color barrier 60 years ago today, the Phillies and visiting Houston Astros will salute Robinson most vividly at Citizens Bank Park. All uniformed personnel will wear jerseys with 42, Robinson's number, which was retired throughout the game 10 years ago. The Phillies will mark the anniversary in other ways before the 1:35 p.m. game. They include: A salute to Bill Cash, Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn and Harold Gould, the four living members of the Philadelphia Stars, the Negro league team that played here from 1934 to 1950 and won the 1934 Negro National League pennant.
SPORTS
April 14, 2007 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins and Florida Marlins lefthander Dontrelle Willis have a great appreciation for Jackie Robinson. Like countless other major leaguers, the two Oakland, Calif., products will proudly wear Robinson's No. 42 tomorrow as part of baseball's nationwide Jackie Robinson Day salute. Rollins and Willis share more than admiration of the man who broke the sport's color barrier 60 years ago tomorrow. The two Encinal High School grads also feel a responsibility to help increase the flow of black players like themselves into the game, as each explained in separate interviews recently: Question: What would you tell an African American kid who asks: Why should I play baseball?
SPORTS
April 14, 2007 | By Todd Zolecki, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins and Florida Marlins lefthander Dontrelle Willis have a great appreciation for Jackie Robinson. Like countless other major leaguers, the two Oakland, Calif., products will proudly wear Robinson's No. 42 tomorrow as part of baseball's nationwide Jackie Robinson Day salute. Rollins and Willis share more than admiration of the man who broke the sport's color barrier 60 years ago tomorrow. The two Encinal High School grads also feel a responsibility to help increase the flow of black players like themselves into the game, as each explained in separate interviews recently: Read other stories in this series, view historical photos and listen to audio slide shows at http://go.
NEWS
July 13, 2004 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Rollins and Desi Relaford have much in common. They are both major-league baseball players. They are both African American. They both heard the same question as they played the sport they loved during their formative years. "What are you doing playing a white man's game?" "I heard it all the time," said Rollins, the Phillies shortstop who grew up in Alameda, Calif., near Oakland. "Guys would ask me that in high school," said Relaford, a Jacksonville, Fla., native and former Phillie who is now a Kansas City Royal.
SPORTS
April 16, 2004 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phillies outfielder Doug Glanville called Jackie Robinson a great American story. There's no question about that. It is why the Phillies celebrated Jackie Robinson Day yesterday with five Negro leagues players from the Philadelphia Stars: Harold Gould, Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn, Wilmer Harris and Bill Cash. On April 15, 1947, Robinson integrated baseball in the modern era when he made his debut for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He retired after the 1956 season and was 53 when he died of a heart attack in 1972.
SPORTS
March 4, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Jackie Robinson will be honored every April 15 by Major League Baseball, starting with a national celebration at Shea Stadium paying tribute to the Hall of Famer's legacy. Commissioner Bud Selig announced Jackie Robinson Day yesterday, saying "we are further ensuring that the incredible contributions and sacrifices he made - for baseball and society - will not be forgotten. " Robinson will be honored each year at all major league ballparks hosting a game on April 15, the anniversary of the date he broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 with Brooklyn.
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