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Jafar Panahi

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hana Saeidi, the bright young niece of Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, climbs into the taxi that her uncle is driving on the streets of Tehran. She is holding a camera, excited about her first film class in school. Her teacher has provided a list of rules to make a "distributable" movie. Among the key rules: "No sordid realism. " In the small and brilliant Jafar Panahi's Taxi , the internationally renowned director has been reduced to making his own brand of "sordid realism" on the sly - that is, realism free of the restrictions of Sharia law. With a small camera mounted on the dashboard of a car, Panahi drives along, picking up passengers and recording them as they debate politics and religion, crime and punishment, Woody Allen and Akira Kurosawa.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jafar Panahi's Taxi. The Iranian filmmaker, technically under house arrest and banned from making movies in his homeland, drives a cab around Tehran, picking up passengers and capturing their conversations, their troubles, their hopes and fears on a tiny dashboard camera. From the confines of an automobile, a whole world emerges. No MPAA rating Bridge of Spies. Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance star in Steven Spielberg's taut Cold War thriller, a based-on-true-events spy-swap yarn set in New York and Berlin, steeped in paranoia and period detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Greatness is a word often associated with Iranian cinema. But fun? Practically never. Jafar Panahi's exuberant and subversive "Offside," however, scores on both points. The director of such harrowing masterworks as "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold" lightens up with this absurdist story of a gaggle of teenage girls who get busted trying to sneak into Tehran's males-only soccer stadium to watch a World Cup qualifying game against Bahrain. Foul-mouthed, sassy and quite delightfully sports-crazed, these chicks (as they're called by all the men who struggle to control them, at least in the subtitles)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A sequel of sorts to The White Balloon - Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi's wonderful and wanderful tale of a Tehran girl's small adventures alone in the big city - The Mirror again focuses its cameras on diminutive Mina Mohammad Khani. This precocious and self-possessed child, with her squeaky voice and searching, saucer-shaped eyes, by no means fits the Hollywood notion of cute. Yet little Mina owns the camera, and Panahi and his crew (and Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, who in this case contributed the script)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The 2003 Cannes winner Crimson Gold comes from Iranian director Jafar Panahi (The White Balloon, The Circle) - from a script by Iran's filmmaking patriarch, Abbas Kiarostami. Set in modern-day Tehran, it is a mesmerizing, and devastating, story. Crimson Gold follows a seriously overweight working stiff by the name of Hussein (Hussein Emadeddin), who delivers pizzas on his motorbike for a living. Rebuffed and humiliated by the proprietor of a swanky European-style jewelry shop where he has gone with his future brother-in-law, Hussein commits a sudden, lurching act of violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
You've scored a ticket to the World Cup qualifying match and stadium guards deny you entrance. What's your next move? If you're a soccer-mad girl in Offside, a girl dressed as a boy because Iranian females are not permitted to attend sporting events, you strike, you go for the goal, you will not be denied. Exhilarating, exuberant and drolly funny, Jafar Panahi's film is a sly piece of social commentary filmed stealthily, quasi-documentary style, during the 2006 qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain at Tehran's Azadi stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The news from the maternity ward isn't good. It's not that anything's wrong with the baby, or the mother, in the Tehran hospital - they're both in fine health. Only that the newborn infant, which ultrasound readings had suggested was a boy, has turned out to be a girl. And in the modern-day Iran of Jafar Panahi's The Circle, females are decidedly second-class citizens, fated to a life of narrow possibilities. The new grandmother waiting outside the maternity-ward door is so stricken with fear in anticipation of the reaction from her son-in-law's family that she flees the hospital, a look of grim terror in her eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Epically stubborn and willful, Razieh, the 7-year-old heroine of filmmaker Jafar Panahi's keenly observed The White Balloon, spies a fat, frilly goldfish in a Tehran marketplace, and she wants it. Boy, does she ever. In this simple, unhurried odyssey through the dusty side streets and winding alleys of Iran's capital, Razieh (Aida Mohammad-khani) whines and wheedles until she separates a banknote from her mother and runs back to the shopkeeper to make her purchase. It is New Year's Eve in the Muslim city, and stores are in the last bustling throes of commerce before closing for the country's weeklong holiday.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Iranian activists win EU award TEHRAN, Iran - The European Union gave its most prestigious human-rights award on Friday to two convicted Iranian activists, the imprisoned lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh and the formerly imprisoned filmmaker Jafar Panahi. The award, the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, which has previously gone to international figures such as Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Aung San Suu Kyi of Myanmar, comes at a time of deepening tensions between Iran and the West.
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NEWS
November 8, 2015 | Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jafar Panahi's Taxi. The Iranian filmmaker, technically under house arrest and banned from making movies in his homeland, drives a cab around Tehran, picking up passengers and capturing their conversations, their troubles, their hopes and fears on a tiny dashboard camera. From the confines of an automobile, a whole world emerges. No MPAA rating Bridge of Spies. Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance star in Steven Spielberg's taut Cold War thriller, a based-on-true-events spy-swap yarn set in New York and Berlin, steeped in paranoia and period detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hana Saeidi, the bright young niece of Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, climbs into the taxi that her uncle is driving on the streets of Tehran. She is holding a camera, excited about her first film class in school. Her teacher has provided a list of rules to make a "distributable" movie. Among the key rules: "No sordid realism. " In the small and brilliant Jafar Panahi's Taxi , the internationally renowned director has been reduced to making his own brand of "sordid realism" on the sly - that is, realism free of the restrictions of Sharia law. With a small camera mounted on the dashboard of a car, Panahi drives along, picking up passengers and recording them as they debate politics and religion, crime and punishment, Woody Allen and Akira Kurosawa.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Iranian activists win EU award TEHRAN, Iran - The European Union gave its most prestigious human-rights award on Friday to two convicted Iranian activists, the imprisoned lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh and the formerly imprisoned filmmaker Jafar Panahi. The award, the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, which has previously gone to international figures such as Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Aung San Suu Kyi of Myanmar, comes at a time of deepening tensions between Iran and the West.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | BY KENNETH TURAN, Los Angeles Times
"A Separation" is totally foreign and achingly familiar. It's a thrilling domestic drama that offers acute insights into human motivations and behavior as well as a compelling look at what goes on behind a particular curtain that almost never gets raised. The early front-runner for the foreign-language Oscar and a rare triple prize winner at the Berlin International Film Festival, this is a movie from Iran unlike any we've seen before. And it's arrived at a time when other Iranian filmmakers, like the more overtly political Jafar Panahi, are being forbidden to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
IN A MOVE bound to have the makings of a gut-wrenching country song, one-time pop-country queen Shania Twain has gotten engaged to business executive Frederic Thiebaud . Us Weekly broke the pseudo-news. What's weird about the engagement, however, is that it sounds more like an episode of "Wife Swap. " Shania first confirmed in August 2009 that she was dating Thiebaud after her divorce from her hit music producer Robert "Mutt" Lange . The aptly named "Mutt," it seems, was having an affair with Shania's BFF, Marie-Anne Thiebaud . Now connect the dots.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Greatness is a word often associated with Iranian cinema. But fun? Practically never. Jafar Panahi's exuberant and subversive "Offside," however, scores on both points. The director of such harrowing masterworks as "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold" lightens up with this absurdist story of a gaggle of teenage girls who get busted trying to sneak into Tehran's males-only soccer stadium to watch a World Cup qualifying game against Bahrain. Foul-mouthed, sassy and quite delightfully sports-crazed, these chicks (as they're called by all the men who struggle to control them, at least in the subtitles)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
You've scored a ticket to the World Cup qualifying match and stadium guards deny you entrance. What's your next move? If you're a soccer-mad girl in Offside, a girl dressed as a boy because Iranian females are not permitted to attend sporting events, you strike, you go for the goal, you will not be denied. Exhilarating, exuberant and drolly funny, Jafar Panahi's film is a sly piece of social commentary filmed stealthily, quasi-documentary style, during the 2006 qualifying match between Iran and Bahrain at Tehran's Azadi stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2005 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A layover gone awry lends title to the performance, a kaleidoscope of spoken word backed by a small orchestra, at the Painted Bride Art Center this weekend. In What Language? A Song Cycle of Lives in Transit had its genesis in the experience of an Iranian filmmaker six months before al-Qaeda turned airports into paranoid places where every Timberland boot could be a time bomb. Officials at JFK in New York stopped Jafar Panahi, then en route from Hong Kong to Buenos Aires to promote his documentary about the plight of Iranian women.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The 2003 Cannes winner Crimson Gold comes from Iranian director Jafar Panahi (The White Balloon, The Circle) - from a script by Iran's filmmaking patriarch, Abbas Kiarostami. Set in modern-day Tehran, it is a mesmerizing, and devastating, story. Crimson Gold follows a seriously overweight working stiff by the name of Hussein (Hussein Emadeddin), who delivers pizzas on his motorbike for a living. Rebuffed and humiliated by the proprietor of a swanky European-style jewelry shop where he has gone with his future brother-in-law, Hussein commits a sudden, lurching act of violence.
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