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NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County inmate with a history of incarceration violence was charged yesterday with killing his cell mate. Joel Seidel, 65, of Cherry Hill, was found in his cell in the jail's mental health wing shortly before 8 a.m. Seidel died from multiple blunt trauma injuries to his head and body after allegedly being choked, beaten and stomped by Marvin Lister, 35, one of his two cell mates, according to Camden County Prosecutor Vincent P....
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: Madeline Arrington SHE DOES: Housing rehab SHE SUCCEEDS: Through determination At first, Madeline Arrington wasn't sure she wanted it mentioned in the newspapers that before taking on her current post as an apartment building manager, she spent time in jail. But, on second thought, Arrington decided she had important messages to get out: About how quickly your life can fall apart. About picking up the pieces of your life and starting again. In 1982, Arrington, then 39 years old, a single mother of two daughters, then aged 18 and 9, made what turned out to be a fateful decision.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Cece Lentini, Special to The Inquirer
Ask historian David Kimball about jails, and he'll be blunt. In 34 years with the National Park Service, most of that time in Philadelphia, he never had much to do with them. And the history of penology - the theory and practice of prison management and criminal rehabilitation - never was and isn't now of much interest to him. Except, of course, if he can get specific about one jail in particular. And Burlington County officials are more than happy to let him do so. That one jail is the Burlington County Prison Museum in Mount Holly, where Kimball, who retired from the Park Service in 1987, has spent the last two years breathing new life into the volunteer organization that keeps the 171- year-old building running.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wake of a recent jailhouse suicide in Darby Borough, Police Chief Robert F. Smythe has proposed that a video monitoring system be installed in the cell block at the jail. Smythe last week asked the Borough Council for $1,200 to purchase three cameras, three monitors and lenses. The cameras would be installed above the three cells in the jail. The cameras will give turnkeys on duty the ability to see most of the holding space in the jail at all times. Smythe said that because of the way the jail was constructed, the cameras would provide monitoring for only about 95 percent of the cell space.
NEWS
September 8, 2006
RE MICHAEL Harmon's Aug. 25 letter: Paul Nolan's original letter suggested putting the criminals in jail. Michael disagreed, saying jail isn't the answer because if you lock up the fathers, the children won't be able to learn how to be a man. Should criminals be allowed to beat the system and stay home to teach their sons to do the same? If so, where will the crime and violence end? How about this: Stop breaking the law! That would be a step in the right direction. I'm so tired of hearing people cry "racial profiling" and how "it's the black man being arrested.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester County Jail in Woodbury has about 230 doors, according to Undersheriff Edwin Erickson. About 60 of them don't work. That is not a serious problem, said Erickson, and it is being worked on now. The problem, according to Erickson, is a crowded field of candidates for sheriff, some of whom have seized on the doors as an issue in the campaign. Erickson, one of four candidates for the June 7 Democratic primary, said, "We have so many people that want to become sheriff and are trying to get attention by finding fault with the conditions here.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 65-year-old Germantown woman broke up laughing at her manslaughter sentencing yesterday. Dorothy Barbara Muse reacted with joy when she was told she'd have to remain behind bars for only another six or eight months before being released. "Oh, all right," smiled Muse to Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola. Mazzola sentenced Muse, formerly of Wakefield Street near Ashmead, to 11/2 to 5 years in jail plus five years' probation for killing her neighbor during a dispute inside their apartment building on Aug. 16, 1998.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Going to jail has been a new experience for most of the protesters. But for Maryann Yorina, a 50-year-old homemaker from West Wyoming, Pa., it was her third trip to prison this year. She had spent six days in an Atlanta prison and four more in a Florida jail after participating in anti-abortion protests this year, she said. On Nov. 30, she added Chester County Prison to the list. Yorina was one of 591 protesters arrested July 5 after they demonstrated, in violation of a 1984 court order, at the Women's Suburban Clinic in Paoli.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas judge improperly "constructed a debtor's prison" last month by ordering a Bucks County developer to jail for contempt of court, the developer's attorney argued at an appeal hearing Thursday before Commonwealth Court. The contempt citation and the sentence should be overturned because developer Sunder V. Isaac was cited for failing to do something he was incapable of doing - fixing hundreds of building-code violations in a Northeast subdivision built by his company, Ramex International Inc., attorney Carl Primavera said.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Camden County officials accused the local Policemen's Benevolent Association yesterday of vandalism related to a proposal to privatize the county jail. The police union denied any connection to slashed tires at County Administrator Ross Angilella's home or leaves burned outside Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli Jr.'s home. The county's prosecutor has met with union members to try to cool tempers over the privatization proposal, spokesman Jason Laughlin said last night, but no individual or organization is suspected in the vandalism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2015
I ENVISION my son one day embarking upon the science career he desires. I expect my daughter to attend an Ivy League law school, where she'll use her gifts of deduction and reason to level the scales of justice. I know there are thousands of children with similar visions. Unfortunately, our city's leaders seem to have a different end in mind for the children of Philadelphia. While our public schools are projecting an $85 million deficit with no certain way to fill the gap, City Council is considering Bill 150406, which was sponsored by 6th District Councilman Bobby Henon with the support of the Nutter administration.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five South Jersey counties that have been exploring the creation of the state's first regional jail system since fall recently ran into trouble amid confusion and misunderstandings over the amount each county would contribute to an $800,000 study. One county dropped out sometime after the first consultant was hired. Another county decided it would pay less than an equal share. And the county that hired the consultant in January on behalf of the four other counties is now scrambling to cement its handshake with them by having them sign written agreements.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether Msgr. William J. Lynn may remain on house arrest or must return to prison to complete his three- to six-year term for child endangerment will be heard Thursday by a Philadelphia judge. The hearing was set by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina after the District Attorney's Office moved to have the Catholic cleric's bail revoked when the state Supreme Court reinstated Lynn's conviction Monday. Lynn, 64, was convicted following a landmark 13-week trial in 2012 involving his role supervising priests accused of sexually abusing children.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THINK OF ALL the stupid - and criminal - things you did as a teen: Drinking in the woods with your friends. Smoking marijuana. Fistfighting. Or worse, stealing. Was it wrong? Yes. Did you get caught? If you grew up in white suburbia, probably not. But think about what could have happened if you grew up poor in a black or Latino neighborhood, where the "War on Drugs" felt like a war on you; where police officers routinely targeted you, just because you looked like you might be up to no good.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
  GARY COTTRELL - the ex-Philly cop who asked witnesses to lie for him when he felt the heat from an investigation into cash loans he gave people from his neighborhood - will spend 10 months in jail for his crime, a federal judge ruled yesterday. The federal government in 2013 charged Cottrell with several counts of loan-sharking, but a jury acquitted him of those charges. The jury convicted him, however, on two counts of obstruction for asking witnesses to deny that he charged them interest on the loans.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
His reluctance to use violence and sabotage as negotiating tactics prompted union colleagues to call him "a zero" and "a waste. " Prosecutors have referred to him as the "reluctant racketeer. " Still, William O'Donnell was sentenced to six months in prison and six months of house arrest Monday for his limited role in Ironworkers Local 401's years-long campaign to extort jobs for members by intimidating builders with threats and attacks. "This kind of conduct in a civilized society . . . is outrageous," U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson said during the hearing in federal court.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
DOUGLAS FERRIN, the Germantown artist who blew off three of his fingers while holding a homemade bomb last May, yesterday told the court that he lived with the shame and embarrassment of his actions. "I see the fire that took my fingers and I feel sick," he said during his sentencing hearing. "I hate myself for having lit that fuse. " Ferrin, 55, yesterday was sentenced to 1 1/2 to three years in prison for his conviction in February on charges of possessing weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine Justin in Argentine jail! Justin Bieber , 21, who recently told the world he has left his criminal past behind, is being sought by police in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A judge on Friday issued an arrest warrant for the Bieb after he failed to respond to a summons in relation to allegations he ordered two bodyguards to attack a photog outside a club in 2013. Justin's reps have yet to issue a comment.   Scott: Ashton was with my GF! Scott Eastwood dropped a bit of a bombshell Thursday night, revealing that Ashton Kutcher had relations with a woman Scott was dating.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mumia Abu-Jamal is back in prison after being hospitalized this week for treatment of diabetes. Abu-Jamal, 60, who is serving a life sentence for killing a Philadelphia police officer in 1981, returned to State Correctional Institution-Mahanoy on Wednesday night after two days in intensive care, said Johanna Fernandez, one of his supporters. His blood-sugar level remains high; Fernandez said it was 336 on Friday afternoon when he was last tested at the prison's infirmary. Any reading above 186 is considered dangerous.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Lower Moreland High School teacher was sentenced Friday to 30 days in jail and 60 days of house arrest for having sex with a student. Erica Ann Ginnetti, 35, was an AP calculus teacher at Lower Moreland High School in 2013 when she had sex with a 17-year-old male student. Ginnetti cried in court Friday morning as she read a letter of apology, and said she has repaired her relationship with her husband and children and built a new career as a fitness instructor. Montgomery County Court Judge Garrett D. Page said her remorse did not lessen the seriousness of her crime.
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