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NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County inmate with a history of incarceration violence was charged yesterday with killing his cell mate. Joel Seidel, 65, of Cherry Hill, was found in his cell in the jail's mental health wing shortly before 8 a.m. Seidel died from multiple blunt trauma injuries to his head and body after allegedly being choked, beaten and stomped by Marvin Lister, 35, one of his two cell mates, according to Camden County Prosecutor Vincent P....
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: Madeline Arrington SHE DOES: Housing rehab SHE SUCCEEDS: Through determination At first, Madeline Arrington wasn't sure she wanted it mentioned in the newspapers that before taking on her current post as an apartment building manager, she spent time in jail. But, on second thought, Arrington decided she had important messages to get out: About how quickly your life can fall apart. About picking up the pieces of your life and starting again. In 1982, Arrington, then 39 years old, a single mother of two daughters, then aged 18 and 9, made what turned out to be a fateful decision.
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's been four weeks since Shatara Gillette was released from a Philadelphia jail with five days' medication for her bipolar disorder. Her medical assistance still hasn't been activated, so it's been more than 20 days since she last took her medication. That has Gillette, 27, worried. "I feel OK for right now," she said, after a group meeting in August at Why Not Prosper, a residential program in Germantown for women leaving prison. She was sent there after 10 months in jail on a drug charge that's still pending; she's also facing charges from 2008 that have not been heard because she was repeatedly deemed incompetent to stand trial.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Cece Lentini, Special to The Inquirer
Ask historian David Kimball about jails, and he'll be blunt. In 34 years with the National Park Service, most of that time in Philadelphia, he never had much to do with them. And the history of penology - the theory and practice of prison management and criminal rehabilitation - never was and isn't now of much interest to him. Except, of course, if he can get specific about one jail in particular. And Burlington County officials are more than happy to let him do so. That one jail is the Burlington County Prison Museum in Mount Holly, where Kimball, who retired from the Park Service in 1987, has spent the last two years breathing new life into the volunteer organization that keeps the 171- year-old building running.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the wake of a recent jailhouse suicide in Darby Borough, Police Chief Robert F. Smythe has proposed that a video monitoring system be installed in the cell block at the jail. Smythe last week asked the Borough Council for $1,200 to purchase three cameras, three monitors and lenses. The cameras would be installed above the three cells in the jail. The cameras will give turnkeys on duty the ability to see most of the holding space in the jail at all times. Smythe said that because of the way the jail was constructed, the cameras would provide monitoring for only about 95 percent of the cell space.
NEWS
September 8, 2006
RE MICHAEL Harmon's Aug. 25 letter: Paul Nolan's original letter suggested putting the criminals in jail. Michael disagreed, saying jail isn't the answer because if you lock up the fathers, the children won't be able to learn how to be a man. Should criminals be allowed to beat the system and stay home to teach their sons to do the same? If so, where will the crime and violence end? How about this: Stop breaking the law! That would be a step in the right direction. I'm so tired of hearing people cry "racial profiling" and how "it's the black man being arrested.
NEWS
March 12, 1988 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
The Gloucester County Jail in Woodbury has about 230 doors, according to Undersheriff Edwin Erickson. About 60 of them don't work. That is not a serious problem, said Erickson, and it is being worked on now. The problem, according to Erickson, is a crowded field of candidates for sheriff, some of whom have seized on the doors as an issue in the campaign. Erickson, one of four candidates for the June 7 Democratic primary, said, "We have so many people that want to become sheriff and are trying to get attention by finding fault with the conditions here.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 65-year-old Germantown woman broke up laughing at her manslaughter sentencing yesterday. Dorothy Barbara Muse reacted with joy when she was told she'd have to remain behind bars for only another six or eight months before being released. "Oh, all right," smiled Muse to Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola. Mazzola sentenced Muse, formerly of Wakefield Street near Ashmead, to 11/2 to 5 years in jail plus five years' probation for killing her neighbor during a dispute inside their apartment building on Aug. 16, 1998.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Going to jail has been a new experience for most of the protesters. But for Maryann Yorina, a 50-year-old homemaker from West Wyoming, Pa., it was her third trip to prison this year. She had spent six days in an Atlanta prison and four more in a Florida jail after participating in anti-abortion protests this year, she said. On Nov. 30, she added Chester County Prison to the list. Yorina was one of 591 protesters arrested July 5 after they demonstrated, in violation of a 1984 court order, at the Women's Suburban Clinic in Paoli.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas judge improperly "constructed a debtor's prison" last month by ordering a Bucks County developer to jail for contempt of court, the developer's attorney argued at an appeal hearing Thursday before Commonwealth Court. The contempt citation and the sentence should be overturned because developer Sunder V. Isaac was cited for failing to do something he was incapable of doing - fixing hundreds of building-code violations in a Northeast subdivision built by his company, Ramex International Inc., attorney Carl Primavera said.
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TRAVEL
September 19, 2016 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
Unless someone tries to sneak contraband through customs, it's rare for tourists to end up behind bars on vacation. However, with an abundance of prison tours around the world, it's possible to visit the grittier side of life. In fact, one of the most famous - and groundbreaking - prisons in the world is in Philadelphia. Eastern State Penitentiary, built by the Quakers in 1829, provided each prisoner with his own cell (rare at the time), designed to encourage convicts to become penitent.
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
It's been four weeks since Shatara Gillette was released from a Philadelphia jail with five days' medication for her bipolar disorder. Her medical assistance still hasn't been activated, so it's been more than 20 days since she last took her medication. That has Gillette, 27, worried. "I feel OK for right now," she said, after a group meeting in August at Why Not Prosper, a residential program in Germantown for women leaving prison. She was sent there after 10 months in jail on a drug charge that's still pending; she's also facing charges from 2008 that have not been heard because she was repeatedly deemed incompetent to stand trial.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
A former Chester County district judge who concealed a harassment citation against her son went to prison Thursday, ending her fight to avoid incarceration while she is under treatment for breast cancer. Rita Jo Ann Arnold, 60, of Downingtown, was sentenced in October 2013 to 16 to 32 months in state prison, more than double the term under state sentencing guidelines. She served six days at the State Correctional Institution in Muncy, Lycoming County, before being released on bail pending appeals.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Criminal defendants who cannot make cash bail are far more likely to be convicted than similarly situated suspects who receive pretrial release, say two new University of Pennsylvania studies. The work suggests that the inability to pay bail traps many of the accused in a cycle of criminal conduct. The studies, covering hundreds of thousands of criminal cases in Philadelphia and the Houston area, found that defendants who were unable to make bail were far more likely to plead guilty than those who had been released, after adjusting for differences in judges, defendants' circumstances and other factors.
NEWS
August 27, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
By her estimate, Stacey Wilson has spent more than a week of her life traveling to and from prisons to visit her son Derron, who is serving 7-and-a-half  to 15 years for attempted murder. He formerly was imprisoned at Graterford and Camp Hill, and she visited as often as twice a week. But these days, Derron Wilson, 25, is incarcerated at the Pennsylvania State Correctional Institution at Mercer - a 722-mile round-trip to Western Pennsylvania from Wilson's Wissinoming home. The trips take a toll, financially and physically.
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
TAX POLICY is an issue this election season, and it's also an issue for Teresa Giudice . According to RadarOnline.com, a federal tax lien was filed against the Real Housewife of New Jersey and her imprisoned husband Joe , on June 15, for $219,804.38. A previous lien had been filed against Teresa and Joe on April 29. That one was for $243,425.50. That's a hefty chunk of IOUs with Joe in jail and Teresa struggling. "Pretty much all [my] businesses went to sh--," when she got sent to the slammer, she said on Bravo's Watch What Happens Live . Shop Kanye Kanye West fans can buy a taste of "The Life of Pablo" this weekend following the rapper-turned-fashion mogul's announcement of 21 pop-up stores worldwide that will be open for just three days, beginning Friday.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At age 16, Donyea Phillips hit rock bottom in segregated housing at Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center, with a bed sheet for a noose. "As my fingers and toes started going numb, I remembered Sarah," he said. That's Sarah Morris, who runs arts workshops for children in the city's adult jails: She was the only person he could recall encouraging him. "She told me I was good at writing poems. At the last minute, I remembered that. When I got a sheet around my neck, she saved my life.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
On Monday, construction workers digging at the site of the former Suit Corner store on the southwest corner of Third and Market Streets uncovered something other than a blazer and trousers. Specifically, construction worker Ery Chacon said Tuesday, they found two brick arches about 10 feet below street level - and experts say they could be from before the nation was founded. As it happens, people who were collared ended up at that location long before it became the Suit Corner, which was destroyed by fire in 2014.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
The former athletic director of the Coatesville Area School District was sentenced Thursday to at least two months in prison for stealing $15,000 from the financially struggling school system. James Donato, who resigned three years ago after school officials discovered racist and sexist text messages about students and staff sent between him and the former superintendent, pleaded guilty to felony theft and conflict of interest charges on June 20. He had been facing 139 misdemeanor and felony charges.
NEWS
August 6, 2016
ISSUE | HOMELESSNESS We should do better The time may have come when a "Get into jail free" card is more valuable than a "Get out of jail free" card. A woman in Wyoming could have used one ("FBI: Woman stole her way back to jail," Saturday). The woman, who was recently released from prison, robbed a Cheyenne bank, threw thousands of dollars in the air, and waited to be arrested. She wanted to go back to prison, investigators said, because she had been beaten on the streets and could not get into a homeless shelter.
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