CollectionsJaime Laredo
IN THE NEWS

Jaime Laredo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducting; Jaime Laredo, violin soloist. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Tuesday at Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. As this weekend's guest artist, the Philadelphia Orchestra's program book lists Jaime (pronounced Jamie) Laredo, violinist. Yes, he'll be here playing his 1717 Stradivarius in the Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1, between Fruhbeck's interpretations of excerpts from Mendelssohn's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and the urgent Beethoven Seventh Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When a violinist has as much performance and teaching mileage as Jaime Laredo, any 70th-birthday concert is bound to have meetings of remarkable musicians. Lots of them. The big piece at "Jaime Laredo and Friends" on Sunday at the Curtis Institute was the Mendelssohn Octet . Half the eight musicians were people I'd go to hear as individuals. Though often played by two string quartets in tandem, Laredo's ad hoc group worked just fine, perhaps because the musicians have common lineage - Laredo as a longtime colleague or teacher.
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
BRANDENBURG ENSEMBLE, Jaime Laredo, violin and conductor; Leila Josefowicz, violin. At Irvine Auditorium, 3401 Spruce Street, 8 p.m. Friday. Tickets: $15-25. Info: 215-898-3900. From her very first student recitals at Curtis Institute, Philadelphia's music lovers realized that violinist Leila (LEE-la) Josefowicz was an exceptional talent. The world soon heard it as well, because the lovely young lady with the fabulous technique and deep immersion in the music had two (of her five)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Violinist and conductor Jaime Laredo is a long way away from his student days at the Curtis Institute in the 1950s. But he's hardly forgotten them, and how could he? Since 1971, he's been a member of the faculty. "Every time he comes to class, he says it reminds him of his student days here," says Soovin Kim, 22, one of Laredo's violin students. "He says everything feels the same, there are the same number of outstanding talents, but he thinks the overall level of standards is higher now. " On Sunday afternoon, Kim and two other soloists from the school will perform with Laredo at the Trinity Center for Urban Life on Spruce Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Musica Pacifica sounds a rather placid name for a group as high-energy as the quintet that played St. Mark's Episcopal Church on Locust Street Monday night. The ensemble, whose members have affiliations on the West Coast, specialize in baroque music performed on period instruments. Secular music of the 17th century offers such vivacity, such sparkle, it's easy to see why listeners return to it again and again. The music is built upon easily assimilated, recurring patterns, though few as simple or continuous as Marco Uccellini's Sonata sopra la Bergamasca, which floated fetching tunes for recorder and violin over an eight-note bass line.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
As a teenage music student, pianist Ruth Laredo was notorious for being able to play any finger-busting repertoire that was put in front of her. As a 67-year-old veteran of thousands of concerts and one of America's best-known native-trained pianists, she played a recital at the Metropolitan Museum of Art less than three weeks before succumbing to ovarian cancer Wednesday at her home in New York City. "That doesn't surprise me," said Philadelphia Chamber Music Society founder Anthony P. Checchia.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Inevitably, "esteemed" is the jargony adjective that attaches itself to groups that have been around as long as the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio, but the ensemble has the numbers to back it up. The group was founded by way of a White House performance for Jimmy Carter's 1977 inauguration. Do all those years of playing together show? While it was true in an appearance Thursday night with the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society that the sum equaled more than the total of the parts, you might have expected a little more impact from the KLR. Not to overstate the case, but if put to the blindfold test, I'm not sure I could have said that the sounds coming from the Perelman stage matched the potential of such a long performance history together.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Curtis Chamber Orchestra is hitting the road with its customary vigor and intelligence, though its program - performed Monday at the Kimmel Center, subsequently in Washington and New York - was a this-and-that calling card perhaps aimed more at establishing the Curtis Institute identity than at making a cohesive artistic statement. The exterior conceit in this concert, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, was a musical meeting ground between two starry Curtis graduates from different generations, violinists Jennifer Koh (2002)
NEWS
April 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Let's not be offended that Kitty Carlisle Hart and Anna Moffo bailed on the Curtis Symphony Orchestra at intermission Tuesday at Carnegie Hall. They were the celebrity chairwomen at a gala dinner that raised $100,000 for Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music. Though Hart looks 65, she's pushing 95 - and having a sumptuous black limo at your disposal is hard to resist. Besides, violinist Joshua Bell, with all of his fabulous-by-accident glamour, stayed to the end. And any un-exhausted person would want to. Though the world's great orchestras come through Carnegie Hall, the Curtis Symphony Orchestra under conductor Michael Stern delivered a combination of vigor and technical assurance - plus a density of talent - that created a singularly thrilling experience, if not the deepest one. (The program will be repeated at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Kimmel Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Symphony Orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music has had a supremely starry season: a tour to Europe, a visit to Carnegie Hall and now, at it's conclusion, a WHYY-TV telecast, which was taped Monday at the Academy of Music for later broadcast. Luckily, the orchestra and institution haven't run out of improved ways to put its best feet forward. This concert revived much of the Carnegie program - Brahms' Symphony No. 4 and Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3 with Jaime Laredo - only with conductor Robert Spano rather than Andre Previn (big difference, there)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Inevitably, "esteemed" is the jargony adjective that attaches itself to groups that have been around as long as the Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio, but the ensemble has the numbers to back it up. The group was founded by way of a White House performance for Jimmy Carter's 1977 inauguration. Do all those years of playing together show? While it was true in an appearance Thursday night with the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society that the sum equaled more than the total of the parts, you might have expected a little more impact from the KLR. Not to overstate the case, but if put to the blindfold test, I'm not sure I could have said that the sounds coming from the Perelman stage matched the potential of such a long performance history together.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Curtis Chamber Orchestra is hitting the road with its customary vigor and intelligence, though its program - performed Monday at the Kimmel Center, subsequently in Washington and New York - was a this-and-that calling card perhaps aimed more at establishing the Curtis Institute identity than at making a cohesive artistic statement. The exterior conceit in this concert, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, was a musical meeting ground between two starry Curtis graduates from different generations, violinists Jennifer Koh (2002)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
When a violinist has as much performance and teaching mileage as Jaime Laredo, any 70th-birthday concert is bound to have meetings of remarkable musicians. Lots of them. The big piece at "Jaime Laredo and Friends" on Sunday at the Curtis Institute was the Mendelssohn Octet . Half the eight musicians were people I'd go to hear as individuals. Though often played by two string quartets in tandem, Laredo's ad hoc group worked just fine, perhaps because the musicians have common lineage - Laredo as a longtime colleague or teacher.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
As a teenage music student, pianist Ruth Laredo was notorious for being able to play any finger-busting repertoire that was put in front of her. As a 67-year-old veteran of thousands of concerts and one of America's best-known native-trained pianists, she played a recital at the Metropolitan Museum of Art less than three weeks before succumbing to ovarian cancer Wednesday at her home in New York City. "That doesn't surprise me," said Philadelphia Chamber Music Society founder Anthony P. Checchia.
NEWS
April 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Let's not be offended that Kitty Carlisle Hart and Anna Moffo bailed on the Curtis Symphony Orchestra at intermission Tuesday at Carnegie Hall. They were the celebrity chairwomen at a gala dinner that raised $100,000 for Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music. Though Hart looks 65, she's pushing 95 - and having a sumptuous black limo at your disposal is hard to resist. Besides, violinist Joshua Bell, with all of his fabulous-by-accident glamour, stayed to the end. And any un-exhausted person would want to. Though the world's great orchestras come through Carnegie Hall, the Curtis Symphony Orchestra under conductor Michael Stern delivered a combination of vigor and technical assurance - plus a density of talent - that created a singularly thrilling experience, if not the deepest one. (The program will be repeated at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Kimmel Center.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos conducting; Jaime Laredo, violin soloist. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Tuesday at Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. As this weekend's guest artist, the Philadelphia Orchestra's program book lists Jaime (pronounced Jamie) Laredo, violinist. Yes, he'll be here playing his 1717 Stradivarius in the Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1, between Fruhbeck's interpretations of excerpts from Mendelssohn's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and the urgent Beethoven Seventh Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Symphony Orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music has had a supremely starry season: a tour to Europe, a visit to Carnegie Hall and now, at it's conclusion, a WHYY-TV telecast, which was taped Monday at the Academy of Music for later broadcast. Luckily, the orchestra and institution haven't run out of improved ways to put its best feet forward. This concert revived much of the Carnegie program - Brahms' Symphony No. 4 and Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3 with Jaime Laredo - only with conductor Robert Spano rather than Andre Previn (big difference, there)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Thursday night, in the opening moments of its first Carnegie Hall concert since 1993, the Symphony Orchestra of the Curtis Institute of Music achieved a startling alchemy in sound. The oft-documented richness of the string section conspired with the generous Carnegie acoustic to give the effect of sound multiplied on itself, boosted by some unseen volume knob that expanded its magnitude from the bottom up and inside out. Too many more moments like this, and these students could put the Philadelphia Orchestra out of work (just kidding)
NEWS
February 10, 2000 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
BRANDENBURG ENSEMBLE, Jaime Laredo, violin and conductor; Leila Josefowicz, violin. At Irvine Auditorium, 3401 Spruce Street, 8 p.m. Friday. Tickets: $15-25. Info: 215-898-3900. From her very first student recitals at Curtis Institute, Philadelphia's music lovers realized that violinist Leila (LEE-la) Josefowicz was an exceptional talent. The world soon heard it as well, because the lovely young lady with the fabulous technique and deep immersion in the music had two (of her five)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Violinist and conductor Jaime Laredo is a long way away from his student days at the Curtis Institute in the 1950s. But he's hardly forgotten them, and how could he? Since 1971, he's been a member of the faculty. "Every time he comes to class, he says it reminds him of his student days here," says Soovin Kim, 22, one of Laredo's violin students. "He says everything feels the same, there are the same number of outstanding talents, but he thinks the overall level of standards is higher now. " On Sunday afternoon, Kim and two other soloists from the school will perform with Laredo at the Trinity Center for Urban Life on Spruce Street.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|