FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 2012
8 to 10 shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons sesame oil ¼ cup Banyuls vinegar (balsamic or sherry can substitute) ¼ cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon togarashi pepper     1. Julienne the shiitake mushrooms, and heat the oil in a medium sauté pan over a medium flame. 2. Add the sliced mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally (while keeping an eye on the flame to prevent them from browning) until they have lost some of their moisture and begin to feel spongy, 7 to 10 minutes.
NEWS
June 14, 2012
4 cups chopped rhubarb 3 cups sugar 2 generous fronds of rosemary 2 lemons, zested and juiced   1. In a large, non-reactive pot, combine the rhubarb, sugar, rosemary and lemon juice. 2. Stir so that the sugar coats everything evenly and let it sit for 30-45 minutes, until it looks juicy. Place pot on the heat and bring to a bubble. Cook until the rhubarb has broken down (7-10 minutes). 3. Let the jam boil for 2 minutes and remove the pot from heat (with a batch this size, it is easy to overcook the jam)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Now that noodling - the improvisational art of "the jam" - has become respectable, it's time to celebrate those locals who have devoted themselves to furthering the jam-band cause with electronic ellipsis, techno-terrorism, humor and hubris: The Disco Biscuits. Deadheads and rave kids alike all groove deeply to CDs such as Uncivilized Area (Hydrophonic) and Encephalous Crime (Diamond Riggs) and CD bootlegs (band-approved) of the group's slowly stewing, improvisational prowess onstage.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
There is a wealth of musical talent on the Main Line, according to percussionist John Breslin. And Breslin believes he has found a way to tap some of that talent through his performances at The Main Lion, which allow members of the audience to play with the band. Since September, the John Breslin Jazz Band has been performing on Sundays from 7 to 11 p.m. at the Main Lion on Lancaster Avenue in Strafford. Its repertoire incorporates standard jazz tunes and some improvisational work - the stuff that makes jazz so unpredictably rich.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | By Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
A collision of two tractor-trailers on I-95 in South Philadelphia that left one man dead and at least one other injured, and a five-alarm fire on nearby Delaware Avenue, caused monumental morning rush hour traffic jams today. The trucks crashed in the northbound lanes of I-95 near Tasker Street at 2:54 a.m., police said, when one of the rigs hit an overhead sign. Its driver was found dead inside. His name was not released. The driver of the other truck, Edward Coslin, 33, of National Park, N.J., was taken to Methodist Hospital, where his injuries and condition were not immediately known.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Market Street was all swiveling hips and snapping fingers last night during a rockin', rollin' block party. The four-block jam was the highlight of Day 7 of the Welcome America! celebration, an 11-day orgy of parties and special events to commemorate the opening of the Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Fourth of July. It was curb-to-curb people as thousands turned out for the festivities along Market Street, between 9th and 13th streets. Jugglers and an Uncle Sam on stilts moved through the crowds.
NEWS
April 27, 1991
Forty-one million cases of the stuff produces more than fruit cup and jam. Chilean fruit is key to the survival of Philadelphia's port. To protect that market, six Harrisburg heavyweights head off tomorrow on a 20,000-mile round-trip to the edge of South America. Their spokesman, Bill McLaughlin, says "it's not a trade mission. It's to reassure Chile we love them. " Somehow, the $40,000 cost - for plane tickets, hotels and meals - seems outrageous at a time when those legislative leaders are fighting to avoid bankruptcy for the city and close a $2 billion state budget gap. An argument might be made that healthy discussion about how to solve city and state problems will also take place among the bipartisan delegation leaders on the trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1990 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're not a beach bunny, here's an alternative for landlubbing it on Labor Day weekend: the Penn's Landing Jazz Festival, from Aug. 31 to Sept. 3. Top national acts will join local musicians for the four-day jam on the waterfront. Here's the musical rundown: Aug. 31: Chris Connor, 8 p.m. Sept. 1: Posmontier Brothers (4 p.m.), Special EFX (8 p.m.). Sept. 2: Shirley Scott Trio (5 p.m.), Harper Brothers (8 p.m.). Sept. 3: Reverie (3 p.m.), Sumi Tonooka (5 p.m.)
NEWS
December 31, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Word's music draws on the sounds of Southern worship, but the band itself worships at the altar of jam. Stretching two sets over more than three hours, the five-piece group touched on a handful of gospel classics, but its sound has more to do with the Allman Brothers than Sister Rosetta Tharpe. When the Word's other members picked Robert Randolph to play pedal steel on their self-titled 2000 album, he was virtually unknown outside the devotional circuit. Seven years later, he is arguably its marquee player, acknowledged as a contemporary master of his chosen instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Neo-hippie groove meisters Rusted Root are a lot like the Teletubbies: soft and sappy, and college students find them trippy. Like the Tubbies, the band has a worldview that is nothing short of warm, fuzzy humanism, and it puts its money where its mouth is, staging a food drive at each tour stop and donating to local charities a dollar from each ticket sold. So, beating up on Rusted Root is a bit like saying Tinky Winky isn't manly enough. The hard-working Pittsburgh group's music is a bland stew of post-Grateful Dead jam gymnastics, Afro-pop tribal beats, and vaguely mysterious Eastern modal chords.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
As New York City prepares to do away with cash bail for thousands of low-level offenders charged with nonviolent crimes, Jim Kenney is weighing a bail proposal for Philadelphia, part of a broader plan to address the city's overcrowded prisons in the event that he wins the mayor's office this fall. Kenney's campaign spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, declined to provide details on what he is considering. But she said Kenney, who in May won the Democratic nomination for mayor, is looking to reduce the city's prison population while ending what she called "the epidemic of nonviolent offenders being kept in prison because of their inability to make nominal bails.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
This year's Philly 4th of July Jam - the Saturday night pre-fireworks extravaganza culmination of the Wawa Welcome America festival on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - featured a little bit of country, a little bit of outré R&B, and a whole lot of the Roots. The country came courtesy of big-voiced Georgia vocalist Jennifer Nettles, and the envelope-pushing R&B from Los Angeles singer Miguel. The Roots were hosts and house band for the fifth year running for the giant celebration on an unseasonably cool evening in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art steps.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2015 | By Bruce Klauber, For The Inquirer
After 25 years and more than 1,300 Tuesday-night jazz jam sessions at Center City's 23rd Street Cafe, the horns, drums, basses, guitars, violins, harmonicas, and singers will soon be silenced for good. The property at 223 N. 23d Street will be demolished this summer, likely to make way for condominiums. (No firm date has been set for that demolition, so the jams will keep going until . . . they can't.) The concept, a jam session open to amateur and professional musicians and singers of all ages and skill levels, was the brainchild of Dutch architect Herman DeJong, jazz lover and onetime amateur bassist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Hot-shot Philadelphia guitarist Joe Jordan and his prog-metal band the Experiment (JJX) are playing as part of WMMR/Jaxon's Local Shots Mistletoe Jam tonight. The gig will be as bittersweet as his upcoming 2015 album, Lemonade . "We named it exactly why you'd think we would," says Jordan, 28. The album grew out of about a year's worth of long tours, sour management changes (a problem that's all good now), and personal struggles. Jordan says it's richer and more accessible than 2012's Twisted Visions . "We're still heavy," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The late Don Cornelius would've dug Friday's Soul Train Music's first WDAS Holiday Jam at the Liacouras Center. Cornelius, the man who created the African American dance program, loved Philly. The band MFSB's 1974 hit, "TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)" was once Soul Train 's theme song. This city loved Cornelius back, evidenced in part by Philly's Questlove's having penned Soul Train: The Music, Dance, and Style of a Generation in 2013. It made sense then that DJ Questlove was the glue holding Soul Train's WDAS Holiday Jam together, spinning vintage funk and rap between sets from '90s soul classicists Faith Evans, Joe, Ledisi, Kem, and Philly's own Jill Scott.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Watch sports drivers compete, career, and crush stuff with their 12-foot-tall, five-ton, high-powered trucks Friday and Saturday at Monster Jam at the Wells Fargo Center. Motorsports drivers will perform freestyle extravaganzas head-to-head, jumping sky-high over obstacles including trucks, vans, boats, cars, and buses in their decked-out, characterized monster vehicles. There will be wheelies, pirouettes, and lots of demolition. The popular Candice Jolly (check out her crazy socks)
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's summer's last fling. Roads will be jammed, trains crowded, and airplanes full. Ah, Labor Day weekend. Nearly 35 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home for end-of-summer celebrations, the highest volume for the holiday since 2008, said AAA, the nation's largest auto club. The majority, 29.7 million, will drive. While that travel is good for the economy, thousands will be frustrated by longer travel times, congestion, delays, and the lack of alternative transportation options, according to the U.S. Travel Association.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Jam on the River, a music festival that's been cheered, changed, merged, and abandoned, returned triumphantly to Penn's Landing on Sunday. This time it was reincarnated as - of course! - an electronic dance party. The come-and-go history of the event made no difference to hundreds of fans who came to hear bands such as GRiZ, Conspirator, Zoogma, Grimace Federation, and the headliner, Lotus. It was a crowd mostly in its 20s that exuded a peace-and-love vibe, where clothes the color of the rainbow were standard, and dozens of people moved to the music accompanied by a throw-back accessory: the hula hoop.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Going with the theme that the best place to celebrate America's birthday is the place where the country was born, city officials announced Monday the planned festivities for the nation's 238th anniversary. "This is Philadelphia. We own this," Mayor Nutter said. "There is no better place to celebrate the Fourth of July than right here, Philadelphia, the birthplace of freedom, liberty, and democracy for the United States. " City officials and festival organizers are encouraging people to use #PhillyOwnsthe4th when discussing the event on social media.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Robert Calandra and Don Sapatkin, For The Inquirer
For anyone who hadn't heard, Lady B was shouting it over the air Monday afternoon. "I want to tell people one more time that today is the deadline, the deadline, the deadline to get your health coverage," Lady B, who is known as Wendy Clark in real life, told her listeners at Philadelphia's WRNB (100.3-FM). They heard. With triple the traffic of the previous record on Healthcare.gov, Monday had the potential to confirm wildly divergent points of view - that new glitches on the Obamacare website showcased the administration's ineptness or that the clamor for coverage proved that the president's signature initiative was on target.
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