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NEWS
May 8, 2006 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
From the moment she walked onstage at the TLA Friday night as one of the retro-country Little Willies, Norah Jones pretended she wasn't a huge superstar, and the near sell-out crowd tried its best to play along. For 90 minutes, it was almost possible to forget about all the Grammy Awards and millions of albums sold. Jones, with her willingness - no, make that eagerness - to share the limelight, became just one of the guys in the band. You could forget the "Snorah" jokes, too; the 27-year-old chanteuse was positively energized, her natural musicianship taking flight amid onstage improvisation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Gov't Mule has such a massive catalog of songs that front man Warren Haynes says it's unlikely the band will repeat any of them during its two-night run at the Tower Theater. In fact, he says, it's possible that none of the songs played in Philly will even make their way to New York's Beacon Theatre for the quartet's two-night stand there. "It's literally hundreds of songs," the soft-spoken guitarist and singer said. "We usually go for three hours or so. It ends up being a long night, but you're pleasantly exhausted at the end of it. " Based on the fact that Haynes is a full-time member of both Gov't Mule and the Allman Brothers Band - and has a solo career - you'd expect him to be, uh, pleasantly exhausted offstage, too. But the musician, 52, whose controlled intensity nabbed him the No. 23 spot on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists" list, says he is quite energized by his musical path.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phish is going belly-up. The Vermont-bred jam band announced on its Web site yesterday that it's pulling the plug after nearly 21 years of making music. It will go out after Coventry, the two-day arts festival it will headline Aug. 14 and 15 in its home state. Guitarist Trey Anastasio wrote to fans, saying he got together Friday night with Mike Gordon, Page McConnell and Jonathan Fishman "to talk openly about the strong feelings I've been having that Phish has run its course and that we should end it now while it's still on a high note.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1996 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
That backbeat - so loose, so confident, a dance pulse if ever there was one. That keening B-3 organ - not fully jazz or funk, sailing along without a care. It's tempting to call what Medeski, Martin and Wood does "jamming. " But hold back. For John Medeski's sake. "There's a lot of jamming going on right now," the 31-year-old keyboardist said with a chuckle Tuesday, before embarking on a tour that includes a Saturday night gig opening for Los Lobos at the Electric Factory.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ticketmaster, the concert-ticketing giant accused last month of antitrust violations, has countersued the String Cheese Incident, contending that the Colorado jam band's practice of selling seats directly to fans interferes with Ticketmaster's contracts with venues. In papers filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Denver, Ticketmaster denied the band's claim that it exploited a monopoly position in the industry to keep the String Cheese Incident from offering its fans tickets with discounted surcharges.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Longtime Jam on the River goers, be forewarned: There's a music festival at Penn's Landing on Saturday and Sunday, but it's entirely different from what you're accustomed to. Since 1986, when the Jambalaya Jam was born as a New Orleans-themed fete full-up with zydeco, Dixieland jazz, and rhythm-and-blues, Memorial Day weekend has meant wide-ranging roots music along the Delaware. And even in recent years, when acts such as Grateful Dead leftovers Ratdog and techno hippies the Disco Biscuits were on the bill, the jam was still the place to catch up with living legends such as Al Green, James Brown and Chuck Berry.
NEWS
October 6, 2003 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
"This is where it gets real good," said the seemingly elastic gentleman dancing next to me as the dexterous, daring, do-it-yourself Colorado jam band String Cheese Incident was deep into its second set at the sold-out Tower Theater on Saturday, the first of two nights in Upper Darby. At that moment, the quintet was on the improvisational tightrope, working without a net as guitarist-vocalist Michael Kang (who also plays mandolin and violin) let his six-string speak in tongues while he led the way through a spaced-out jam in the mountain boogie "Desert Dawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The music of the John Butler Trio is hard to classify, jittering as it does between folk and funk. "Our style will change three times in one song," Butler, 29, says. "We go everywhere, from really spacious ambient folk to really heavy, hard roots music. " Just don't call the trio, which will play North by Northwest Saturday night, a jam band. "We did a few jam-band festivals [including Bonnaroo] and really didn't enjoy it because the audience was so cliquey and judgmental," the dreadlocked Australian guitarist says.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2004 | By ISAAC GUZMAN -- New York Daily News
In the two decades since Phish played its first improvised note, the jam band has become something of a secular religion. People get married at Phish shows. They collect and trade the group's live recordings as if they were sacred shards of scripture. Most of all, the crunchy masses always turn up any day, anywhere that the Vermont-based quartet takes the stage. That abiding faith has made Phish one of the nation's biggest concert draws, selling out multiple nights at arenas and stadium-size festivals alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Gov't Mule has such a massive catalog of songs that front man Warren Haynes says it's unlikely the band will repeat any of them during its two-night run at the Tower Theater. In fact, he says, it's possible that none of the songs played in Philly will even make their way to New York's Beacon Theatre for the quartet's two-night stand there. "It's literally hundreds of songs," the soft-spoken guitarist and singer said. "We usually go for three hours or so. It ends up being a long night, but you're pleasantly exhausted at the end of it. " Based on the fact that Haynes is a full-time member of both Gov't Mule and the Allman Brothers Band - and has a solo career - you'd expect him to be, uh, pleasantly exhausted offstage, too. But the musician, 52, whose controlled intensity nabbed him the No. 23 spot on Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists" list, says he is quite energized by his musical path.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By Jakob Dorof, For The Inquirer
Nowadays it's not easy being Animal Collective. After more than a decade of fortuitous left turns and deft reinventions, the Baltimore-born quartet has entered that paradoxical Twilight Zone where its audience expects the unexpected - but isn't necessarily thrilled when it comes. The group's new album, Centipede Hz , is a clangorous volte-face inward from 2009's unseasonably warm and welcoming Merriweather Post Pavilion . Given the experimental troupe's reputation for seldom looking back, the Hz -heavy set list at the Mann Center on Wednesday was equally unsurprising - as was the cavernous venue's many vacant seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
MUSIC Guiding Lights Lo-fi innovators Guided by Voices are back in the swing, after a mere seven-year layoff. Their 2012 release "Let's Go Eat the Factory" finds the group still aiming for arty (and often absurdist) extremes with ditties like "The Big Hat and Toy Show" and "Doughnut for a Snowman," as dreamed up by front guy Robert Pollard and comrades-in-arms Tobin Sprout, Mitch Mitchell, Greg Demos and Kevin Fennell. All will be on board as the band returns to a favorite Philly haunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time, your average Jam on the River was jammed with . . . jam bands. Dead Head-esque formations playing musical hacky sack, lollygagging through loping rhythmic passages. No more. While 2007's Jam features Dark Star Orchestra - drawing its inspiration from all things Jerry Garcia - to say nothing of The Disco Biscuits post-Dead meanderings, there's little left of the jam mentality save for some of the weekend's peeps taking their time playing long songs. Disco Biscuits do that.
NEWS
May 8, 2006 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
From the moment she walked onstage at the TLA Friday night as one of the retro-country Little Willies, Norah Jones pretended she wasn't a huge superstar, and the near sell-out crowd tried its best to play along. For 90 minutes, it was almost possible to forget about all the Grammy Awards and millions of albums sold. Jones, with her willingness - no, make that eagerness - to share the limelight, became just one of the guys in the band. You could forget the "Snorah" jokes, too; the 27-year-old chanteuse was positively energized, her natural musicianship taking flight amid onstage improvisation.
NEWS
January 2, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Why cram when you can jam? That must have been the idea behind singing-songwriting guitarist Todd Sheaffer's decision in 2001 to leave New Jersey's ruggedly hick-popping (his term) From Good Homes and form Railroad Earth. Yet rather than noodle endlessly in a sea of listless improvisational soloing (ugh), Railroad Earth - who sold out two shows at the TLA on Friday and Saturday - managed a delicious, elegant union within a sextet's arrangement of lengthy country-jazz and bluegrass swing movements.
NEWS
January 3, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Roots are a bunch of show-offs. But who can blame them? Rap band, rock band, funk band, soul band, jazz band, jam band - Philly's finest transmogrifies into whatever beast it wants to be at any given moment. And Friday's sold-out show at the Electric Factory allowed the seven-piece outfit (augmented by the three-man Fatback Taffy horns) to strut its stuff like a Mummers' Fancy Brigade in full plumage. With Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter as rhyme-slinging ringmaster and big-haired drummer Ahmir "?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The music of the John Butler Trio is hard to classify, jittering as it does between folk and funk. "Our style will change three times in one song," Butler, 29, says. "We go everywhere, from really spacious ambient folk to really heavy, hard roots music. " Just don't call the trio, which will play North by Northwest Saturday night, a jam band. "We did a few jam-band festivals [including Bonnaroo] and really didn't enjoy it because the audience was so cliquey and judgmental," the dreadlocked Australian guitarist says.
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