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James Baldwin

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NEWS
November 8, 1986 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suddenly there was movement in the darkness on Cooper Street: A cluster of people had emerged from around a corner, and it appeared to be heading this way. Night had fallen, and it was too dark to tell if he was part of it. Still, a dozen people on the steps of Camden's elegant Walt Whitman Center for the Arts and Humanities leaned forward Thursday night, eager to lay eyes on the man who for almost 40 years has been such an angry and eloquent voice...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Suddenly, the whole world is descending on Walter Dallas. Dallas, head of the School of Theater at the University of the Arts, has in hand a literary property that nearly everybody in the theatrical producing game would love to have a piece of. It is the last play written by the late James Baldwin, first placed with Dallas about five years ago and tonight receiving its maiden workshop performance at UA's Black Box Theater at 313 S. Broad St....
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Baldwin, one of the most powerful and eloquent voices of black America, died Monday at his home in the south of France. Mr. Baldwin, 63, had been suffering from stomach cancer for months and had a portion of his stomach removed earlier this year. "A page has been turned, not only for blacks but for humanity," said his brother David, who was with him at his home in St. Paul de Vence, near the Riviera, when he died. Although Mr. Baldwin had lived for long periods in France, which he called a "refuge from the American madness," he retained his American citizenship and frequently visited the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The James Baldwin of The Midnight Hour, the new one-man play at Freedom Repertory Theatre, is a man at loose ends. Pacing the study of his home in the South of France, downing copious quantities of Scotch, he frets over his stalled book on Martin Luther King, awaits a phone call from a lover who has left him, obsesses about the assassinations that have rocked the American civil-rights movement. It is midnight of an August day in 1978, and the finest black writer of his generation is in a bad way. His angst is captured with visceral precision by actor Reggie Montgomery, who so immerses himself in the writer's temperament that subject and interpreter become one. From certain angles, Montgomery even looks eerily like Baldwin, but what's more convincing is his sense of the writer's style - the quick, broad smile; the expressive hands; the flamboyant carriage; the fury that erupts without warning and subsides just as quickly.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
James Baldwin was 12 years older than I - and 100 years wiser. He encouraged me to write, not for newspapers, but for myself. "You can't be you in somebody else's newspaper," he warned. And in a way, I suppose he was right. But I came along at a time when people sought safety; I wanted a job and what I thought was the protection of a paycheck. I had a child, Pamela, the first of four children. Baldwin's family was his mother, brothers and sisters, some cousins, nieces and nephews.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
It would take a powerful lot of faith to say "Amen" to the production of James Baldwin's The Amen Corner that opened last night at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theater. James Baldwin's play takes up themes of abiding concerns in urban black America. The dilemma of the black woman, for one. The absence of a father, for another. Yet the presentation of these issues in the setting of a storefront Harlem church fails to find dramatic justification. And the Philadelphia Drama Guild's treatment of the play underlines that weakness by adopting a ponderously respectful approach, doling out the drama in drops as if it were holy water instead of an attempt to deal with an anguish that remains as real today as when the play was written in the 1950s.
NEWS
January 12, 2010 | By Lewis Whittington FOR THE INQUIRER
Before the collective closet burst open, Truman Capote and James Baldwin were two authors who spoke to gay America not only through their writings, but also with the force of their fearless personalities. Capote was TV's fey mascot who could intellectually slay anyone in his path, Baldwin a black civil rights activist whose novel Giovanni's Room presented a frank, moving view of gay life. The writers are the focus of two one-man plays being presented in repertory by Mauckingbird Theatre Company this month.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
No, no, James Baldwin had said about an hour earlier; he never rereads his past writings or frets about how he might have written them differently. "When a book is over, it's over," said the man who wrote Go Tell It on the Mountain and The Fire Next Time and Blues for Mr. Charlie. "I read them in public, but it's . . . ummm . . . like reading something that has nothing to do with me now," he had said. "It's like something very far away. " But as lunch was ending, a visitor pulled out a copy of Baldwin's play, The Amen Corner, which the Philadelphia Drama Guild will open at the Annenberg Center tomorrow night, and Baldwin's dark and heavy-lidded eyes widened with delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Walter Dallas knew James Baldwin well and worked with him during the last six years of his life. He was close enough to Baldwin, one of the most significant American writers of the century, to stay at his home in southern France, where the writer lived in self-imposed exile. Actor Reggie Montgomery talked to James Baldwin once - briefly, on the telephone. Montgomery was in New York, and Baldwin in Paris. It might be natural to assume that of the two, Dallas - Baldwin's friend - is more responsible for the creation of The Midnight Hour, a one-man play about the famous writer that Freedom Repertory Theatre is premiering.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
By Darryl Lorenzo Wellington Fifty years ago this month, the black gay novelist James Baldwin penned his powerful essay "A Letter to My Nephew. " In it, he wrote: "You were born into a society which spelled out with brutal clarity and in as many ways as possible that you were a worthless human being. " First published in the Progressive magazine and then reprinted in his book of essays The Fire Next Time , Baldwin's letter outlined what he called "the crux" of his dispute with America.
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NEWS
December 31, 2012
By Darryl Lorenzo Wellington Fifty years ago this month, the black gay novelist James Baldwin penned his powerful essay "A Letter to My Nephew. " In it, he wrote: "You were born into a society which spelled out with brutal clarity and in as many ways as possible that you were a worthless human being. " First published in the Progressive magazine and then reprinted in his book of essays The Fire Next Time , Baldwin's letter outlined what he called "the crux" of his dispute with America.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | Reviewed by Lewis Whittington
Eminent Outlaws The Gay Writers Who Changed America By Christopher Bram Twelve. 384 pp. $27.95   Christopher Bram's 1995 novel The Father of Frankenstein may have been fiction but was so accurate in its depiction of '30s gay film director James Whale that it could have passed for biography. Bram shows even more narrative power in his new nonfiction book Eminent Outlaws: The Gay Writers Who Changed America . Bram's portraits of an often-reluctant gay literary vanguard is fascinating enough, but alongside a 50-year narrative of unexplored gay aesthetic, he also provides a parallel history of the gay-rights movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's hard to think of two contemporary authors more disparate in their writing than jet-setting Truman Capote and freedom-fighting James Baldwin. They do have one link, aside from being writers born in 1924: Both were gay. This might be a questionable connection in the wider scheme of things, but in the context of an ambitious project by Mauckingbird Theatre, the city's professional company devoted to gay-themed work, it makes sense. Mauckingbird is running two plays about the late authors in repertory.
NEWS
January 12, 2010 | By Lewis Whittington FOR THE INQUIRER
Before the collective closet burst open, Truman Capote and James Baldwin were two authors who spoke to gay America not only through their writings, but also with the force of their fearless personalities. Capote was TV's fey mascot who could intellectually slay anyone in his path, Baldwin a black civil rights activist whose novel Giovanni's Room presented a frank, moving view of gay life. The writers are the focus of two one-man plays being presented in repertory by Mauckingbird Theatre Company this month.
NEWS
October 13, 2005 | ROTAN LEE
ADMITTEDLY, and somewhat conceitedly, I covet great literature. Those whose words and phrases ignite the soul, capture the imagination and bring deeper truths to consciousness deserve special status in our lives. The tellers of tales spin yarns that reveal us to ourselves, reaching beyond the simplicity of our good-vs.-evil assumptions, adding length, breadth, and color to our overly simplistic black-and-white worldviews. One of those storytellers, August Wilson, has just died - too quietly and, absurdly, without the funereal histrionics reserved for politicians and celebrities.
NEWS
July 23, 2004 | By Dominic Sama FOR THE INQUIRER
Author James Baldwin (1924-1987), who will be honored with a 37-cent commemorative today in the Literary Arts Series, is remembered for his sharp, poignant words on personal identity and racial politics. He wrote about controversial subjects that most other writers of his time avoided. Baldwin was born in poverty, the out-of-wedlock son of a domestic worker. Growing up in New York's Harlem, Baldwin had to endure the brutality of a stepfather. He spent many hours in the library, which inspired him to become a writer.
SPORTS
January 10, 2002 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christmas passed a couple of weeks ago, but there's still one thing Phillies manager Larry Bowa hopes to find under the swaying palm trees next month when spring training opens. "It's very important," Bowa said yesterday about how much he wants general manager Ed Wade to add a veteran pitcher to the starting rotation. "Talking with Ed, I have all the confidence in the world that we'll have another starting pitcher. If we don't get a starting pitcher, we'll have a lot of young kids who will probably have to go through some tough times.
SPORTS
July 27, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Barry Bonds hit his 43rd and 44th home runs of the season last night, passing Mickey Mantle for ninth place on the career list with 538, as the visiting San Francisco Giants beat Arizona, 11-3. Rich Aurilia and Bonds homered on consecutive pitches for the Giants in the fourth inning against Curt Schilling. Bonds hit a grand slam off Schilling in the fifth. Bonds had not hit a home run, and had just two hits, in his previous 19 at-bats until his line drive cleared the rightfield fence in the fourth inning to put San Francisco ahead, 2-1. In other games: At Montreal, Mike Mordecai fouled off four straight full-count pitches before drawing a bases-loaded walk in the 10th inning to give the Expos a 3-2 victory over Atlanta.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | By Mike Leary
"I met genuine black heroes who made the difference in my life," Claude Lewis once told an interviewer. "I met poet Langston Hughes. . . . I knew Malcolm X, and Muhammad Ali is a friend. James Baldwin and the Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King Jr. encouraged me. I help others, not just blacks, but anyone interested in self-improvement. " Claude was too modest to include himself in their ranks, but he rightly belongs there. As a journalist - the last to interview Malcolm X before his assassination - he was often a witness to history.
SPORTS
May 1, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
After tying Robin Ventura's team record for career grand slams, Ron Karkovice smiled when his teammate threatened him if he keeps it up. "I may have to sabotage him for the rest of his career," Ventura joked after yesterday's 17-11 victory over host Boston, aided by Karkovice's fifth career slam in the eighth inning. But when Ventura was reminded that the grand slam may have saved him from being the goat of the day, he had a little change of heart. "That's why I'm really glad he did it. " Glad because Chicago has committed 19 errors in its first five games - and Ventura has six of them.
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