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James Cameron

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NEWS
June 10, 1998 | by Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Daily News
If you're tired of paying $7 to see "Titanic" - and Leo - for the sixth, seventh, eighth time, be of good cheer. James Cameron's ubiquitous love story will dock in video stores and retail outlets Sept. 1 with the consumer-friendly price of $19.95. The movie, which is nearing the $600 million mark at the box office, will be available initially only on VHS cassette in both pan-and-scan and wide-screen formats. A Spanish-subtitled version of the film will also be sold. No plans have been made for a DVD release.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
Eileen Moran, 60, a visual-effects producer who helped create the look of a bevy of blockbuster movies - from the ethereal world of Avatar down to King Kong's 460 billion strands of wind-rustled specially lighted fur - died Sunday in Wellington, New Zealand. The cause was cancer, her sister Janet Hamill said. Ms. Moran worked closely with the director James Cameron on Avatar and with the director Peter Jackson on the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, to be released in U.S. theaters this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009
'What day is it? What year?" asks the deeply disoriented dude who seems to have emerged from the primal ooze into a post-apocalyptic nightmare. Well, they don't say what day it is, but the year is 2018. In Terminator Salvation - fourth in the cyborgian series launched by James Cameron in 1984 - the man with the questions is Marcus Wright (Sam Worthington), and the weird thing is that at the beginning of the movie, he's strapped to a table in a California correctional facility being put to death for murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
If Titanic was James Cameron's meditation on the limits of technology, his new 3-D conversion underscores the point, to a fault. The conversion was expensive - at $18 million, it cost more to make than this year's Oscar winner ( The Artist , $15 million). And it was ambitious and exacting in the Cameron tradition - he sent bids out all over the world for the best technology, and asked companies to "audition" for the job by converting the same piece of footage. The winning firm spent a reported 60 weeks working round the clock to bring the new 3-D Titanic to theaters ahead of the 100th anniversary of its sinking, April 15. The result?
NEWS
September 10, 2012
ORCHESTRA TIX DEAL Individual tickets for Yannick Nézet-Séguin's inaugural season as music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra go on sale at noon Monday. That day only, the orchestra will cover all box-office fees for tickets purchased in person at the Kimmel Center Box Office at 15th and Spruce. The first 150 people in line will get either a free parking pass or a pair of tickets to the "West Side Story" concert in October. Box office closes at 6 p.m. THE DEEP BLU-RAY SEA Leave it to director James Cameron to go all out on a Blu-ray package for "Titantic.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Hollywood has shown this summer that while its special effects keep getting better, its movies do not. The industry has outdone itself creating spectacular illusions for "Backdraft" and "The Rocketeer," but it hasn't fooled anyone into thinking they're blockbuster material. Next in line is "Terminator 2: Judgment Day," and the result is the same: Great to look at, nothing under the hood. The first cost $6.7 million and wound up a sci-fi classic. The sequel may have cost as much as $110 million (estimates vary)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In one of the flashily mounted chases in True Lies, Arnold Schwarzenegger dangles from a helicopter pursuing an out-of-control stretch limousine. In truth, it's a fitting image of ostentatious waste for a picture whose length so far exceeds its content. With a staggering investment in excess of $100 million, it should perhaps not come as a surprise that James Cameron should entice the customers by offering two movies for the price of one. His much anticipated reunion with Schwarzenegger after the triumph of Terminator 2 has a curiously split personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Sanctum begins with the nowadays ubiquitous "inspired by a true story" prefatory note. The true story here, however - harrowing, but with a happy ending - has been transformed by the filmmakers into an elimination-round spelunking nightmare. Set in a huge and largely unexplored cave system in Papua New Guinea ("the mother of all caves," we're told - cut to an aerial shot of her vulvic maw, ringed by rain forest green), Sanctum follows a team of underwater cavers who become trapped when a flash flood blocks their escape route.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this article
Close followers of James Cameron, the writer-director of Terminator 2: Judgment Day - and that includes all real fans of screen science fiction - will soon realize that he's tried out one of his monsters before. And we don't mean Arnold. The sequel hinges on a clever twist in which two cyborgs from the future come to do battle in the present and thereby influence the course of human history in a post-nuclear world ruled by machines. One of them is a kinder, gentler Arnold Schwarzenegger, who is much changed from the robotic lethal weapon of the splendid Terminator (1984)
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
EVERY ONCE in a while, a 3-D movie includes a sequence that completely validates the technology, and there is one such moment in "Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away. " It involves a beautiful and extremely flexible brunette, diving from the rim of a gigantic cocktail glass, arching as she hits the water to avoid the bottom, then revolving beneath the surface so that we may examine her artistry from every possible angle. To which one can only add: Make mine a double. "Worlds Away" is the latest visual wonderment from the 3-D Fusion camera systems of James Cameron, by way of "Shrek" director Andrew Adamson and the dozens of dancing daredevils who comprise Cirque du Soleil.
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NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
EVERY ONCE in a while, a 3-D movie includes a sequence that completely validates the technology, and there is one such moment in "Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away. " It involves a beautiful and extremely flexible brunette, diving from the rim of a gigantic cocktail glass, arching as she hits the water to avoid the bottom, then revolving beneath the surface so that we may examine her artistry from every possible angle. To which one can only add: Make mine a double. "Worlds Away" is the latest visual wonderment from the 3-D Fusion camera systems of James Cameron, by way of "Shrek" director Andrew Adamson and the dozens of dancing daredevils who comprise Cirque du Soleil.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE LOVES the Internet as much as the next guy but occasionally it can be misleading. With big news stories, Internet sources are so eager to get stories up quickly, a lot of them turn out to be completely wrong. With the recent Newtown massacre, for instance, we quickly learned that the shooter's mother was a teacher at the school, that his father was killed in New Jersey, that he left his mother's Bushmaster rifle in the car and that his name was Ryan. That's Oh-for-four.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
Eileen Moran, 60, a visual-effects producer who helped create the look of a bevy of blockbuster movies - from the ethereal world of Avatar down to King Kong's 460 billion strands of wind-rustled specially lighted fur - died Sunday in Wellington, New Zealand. The cause was cancer, her sister Janet Hamill said. Ms. Moran worked closely with the director James Cameron on Avatar and with the director Peter Jackson on the Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, to be released in U.S. theaters this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
ELLEN DeGENERES was hailed as a trailblazer Monday night as she received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor at the Kennedy Center, in Washington. The show will be broadcast Oct. 30 on PBS stations. When DeGeneres first heard that she was receiving the same honor that Bill Cosby , Tina Fey and Will Ferrell won in recent years, she joked, "It really makes me wonder . . . why didn't I get this sooner?" More than just 'Avatar' Deep-sea explorer James Cameron has come up from beneath the sea. The director of "Aliens," "Terminator 2," "Titanic" and "Avatar," has picked up movie rights to The Informationist , a novel by Taylor Stevens , whose main female character has been compared with Lisbeth Salander, "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
ORCHESTRA TIX DEAL Individual tickets for Yannick Nézet-Séguin's inaugural season as music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra go on sale at noon Monday. That day only, the orchestra will cover all box-office fees for tickets purchased in person at the Kimmel Center Box Office at 15th and Spruce. The first 150 people in line will get either a free parking pass or a pair of tickets to the "West Side Story" concert in October. Box office closes at 6 p.m. THE DEEP BLU-RAY SEA Leave it to director James Cameron to go all out on a Blu-ray package for "Titantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thirty-three years ago Ridley Scott's Alien unleashed on an unsuspecting public one of the most virulent, relentless monsters in movie history. Audiences in 1979 were shocked when, in a now-classic scene, the creature burst onto the scene after tearing, ripping, and biting its way out of John Hurt's chest. Featuring Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, and Ian Holm, Alien is a stunning science-fiction-horror parable that brings to life a creature so utterly different from us, so hostile, so unimaginably other that it is simply called the alien.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
If Titanic was James Cameron's meditation on the limits of technology, his new 3-D conversion underscores the point, to a fault. The conversion was expensive - at $18 million, it cost more to make than this year's Oscar winner ( The Artist , $15 million). And it was ambitious and exacting in the Cameron tradition - he sent bids out all over the world for the best technology, and asked companies to "audition" for the job by converting the same piece of footage. The winning firm spent a reported 60 weeks working round the clock to bring the new 3-D Titanic to theaters ahead of the 100th anniversary of its sinking, April 15. The result?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
THE EUROVISION Song Contest has been won by the likes of Lulu , ABBA , Celine Dion and many performers no one in the U.S. has ever heard of. This year, Russia's entry will be the Buranovo Grannies , eight women from Russia's Udmurtia Republic who blend modern pop sounds - at least what passses for modern in Udmurtia - with their own traditional choral singing style. Their big song? "Party for Everybody," which is part in English and part in Udmart, a distant relation of Finnish.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Sanctum begins with the nowadays ubiquitous "inspired by a true story" prefatory note. The true story here, however - harrowing, but with a happy ending - has been transformed by the filmmakers into an elimination-round spelunking nightmare. Set in a huge and largely unexplored cave system in Papua New Guinea ("the mother of all caves," we're told - cut to an aerial shot of her vulvic maw, ringed by rain forest green), Sanctum follows a team of underwater cavers who become trapped when a flash flood blocks their escape route.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009
'What day is it? What year?" asks the deeply disoriented dude who seems to have emerged from the primal ooze into a post-apocalyptic nightmare. Well, they don't say what day it is, but the year is 2018. In Terminator Salvation - fourth in the cyborgian series launched by James Cameron in 1984 - the man with the questions is Marcus Wright (Sam Worthington), and the weird thing is that at the beginning of the movie, he's strapped to a table in a California correctional facility being put to death for murder.
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