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James Hoffa

BUSINESS
July 9, 1999 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Teamster Local 107 members approved a new labor agreement late last night to end a six-day strike that idled freight trains and caused cargo to pile up on the Philadelphia waterfront. The workers at Ameriport, a South Philadelphia yard that transfers containerized cargo between trains and trucks, agreed to more flexible shift starting times, designed to cut the yard's operating costs. But they held onto their $17.51 hourly wage as well as their benefits package. They also will continue to get overtime after eight hours in a day, instead of after 40 hours in a week, as the employer had proposed, said Frank Gillen, the trustee in charge of Local 107. "There are things we don't like, but we won a lot of damn good things," said Shawn Dougherty, an Ameriport worker who is running for president of Local 107. The 12 Teamster workers at Ameriport went on strike Saturday when a second 30-day extension of their contract with the Delaware River Port Authority expired.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
mergers Failed union may spur others to team up The failed merger of SmithKline Beecham and Glaxo Wellcome may spur other combinations in the drug industry, as the two U.K. companies are likely to seek partners and U.S. rivals bulk up to compete. Zeneca Group, Astra, Roche Holding and Rhone-Poulenc Rorer are among the European drugmakers that analysts say will attract interest from SmithKline and Glaxo, which ended their planned merger on Monday amid differences over who would manage what would have been the biggest drugmaker.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ron Carey was elected Teamsters president five years ago, he vowed to return democracy to the corruption-riddled union. And yesterday, as the 25th meeting of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters opened at the Convention Center, Carey found out that democracy can be loud, boisterous and occasionally obnoxious. The tumult began as soon as he opened the morning session. He was greeted with a steady roar of shouting and heckling from his opponents, loyalists to James Hoffa, son of the former union president, that drowned out Carey and virtually every speaker who followed.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing like a drive to survive to push solidarity between unions - even two unions on opposite sides of last year's split in the labor movement. That's what happened with the Communications Workers of America, led by Larry Cohen, and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, led by James Hoffa. Hoffa was among the leaders who pulled their unions out of the AFL-CIO, denouncing what they called its focus on politics at the expense of organizing and criticizing its leadership.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Dick Polman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consider this improbable juxtaposition of political players: Ralph Nader and James Hoffa. The lanky Mr. Clean, the personification of civic virtue, flirting in public with the squat boss of a union best known for its notorious past. So it went Thursday at Teamsters headquarters. Nader had just pitched his presidential candidacy to the union's executive board, and now Hoffa and Nader were parading before the cameras in an orchestrated show of solidarity. The pairing probably deserves this year's Strange Bedfellows Award, and it speaks volumes about the woes that continue to plague Democratic candidate Al Gore.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who marks their conventions with customized semitrailers snaking through a city, blaring rock music? Who offers campaign buttons in the form of temporary tattoos? Who can turn parliamentary debate into a roller derby? The Teamsters, that's who. And they might ask, "You got a problem with that?" The 25th convention of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which ended Friday at the Convention Center, once again showed there is no other labor union quite like it. It was a week of pushing, shoving and yelling.
NEWS
June 8, 2000
Street is self-seeking John Street will do exactly what John Street wants to do, regardless of the consequences to Philadelphians. He and his henchmen are having a very negative effect. Jam a stadium down the people's throats for overpaid, prima-donna sports workers - and at a site based on what it will do for John Street; to hell with the residents. He says the funds are "dedicated" to a stadium, but funds are shuffled in and out of accounts as easily as you change your socks.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To use the facilities at the National 4-H Center just outside Washington, D.C., people have to sign an agreement promising not to drink alcohol or smoke and to be responsible for any damage they might cause. The Teamsters are coming anyway. Starting today, the center will be the site for the ballot count for the Teamsters' bitter presidential election, which pits incumbent Ron Carey against challenger James Hoffa. The outcome of the election, which has been conducted by mail and has become a focus of attention throughout the labor movement, is expected to be known later in the week.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beefy guy in the Teamsters sport shirt stepped up on the loading dock and headed for the forklift operator, easing his way past a pallet piled high with shipping boxes. "I'm Jim Hoffa. I'm running for president," he said, thrusting his hand out. Hoffa. Teamsters. The words echo from a different era. But the man standing in this freight barn on the outskirts of Cincinnati was no apparition. He is the father's son. And he wants to run the union that made his father famous, the one that cost his father his life.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as he is poised to be installed tomorrow for a second term as Teamsters president, Ron Carey, who has staked his reputation as a labor reformer, is embroiled in a campaign-finance controversy that could threaten his control of the nation's largest union. Carey, who narrowly defeated James P. Hoffa in December balloting, has returned $220,000 in campaign contributions in the last three weeks - about 10 percent of his total fund-raising. The refunds follow allegations by Hoffa, son of the union's infamous former president Jimmy Hoffa, that the donations were at best improper and at worst illegal.
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