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James Joyce

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NEWS
April 8, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phyllis Helen Moss Stein, 92, a former library assistant who was a friend of author James Joyce and his family, died Tuesday at her home in Northeast Philadelphia. Mrs. Stein was born in Dublin, Ireland, and was a student of painter Patrick Tuohy in Paris when Joyce, author of Ulysses, came to Tuohy's studio to have his portrait painted during the 1920s. Mrs. Stein became a friend of the Joyce family. "She is mentioned in all the biographies of James Joyce," said her son, William Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | By Seymour I. Toll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Today is Bloomsday, the day in 1904 James Joyce chose as the time of his great novel Ulysses. Although the book is a monumental literary achievement, its history is quite another story. Honoring Joyce's literary sainthood, celebrations today conjure Poldy Bloom, his yes-saying wife Molly and the misty mews of Dublin. In the most devout quarters such as Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum & Library (owner of the Ulysses manuscripts), torchbearers will run relays of readings of the sacred text, their praise for Joyce gushing like Guinness from the taps of every pub in Dublin.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dog Katie was as intent as anyone on Delancey Place attending the reading yesterday afternoon of excerpts from the novel Ulysses, by James Joyce. Katie, small, white with mocha splotches, was held fast by a line tied between her green collar and a wrought-iron stair railing on the north side of Delancey. She strained toward the speaker across the street, past the 80 to 100 men and women occupying five arching rows of steel and plastic folding chairs set on the pavement. And it was not just because the voice was coming to Katie over two large speakers mounted atop poles and reading a passage about dogs.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"I've put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant, and that's the only way of insuring one's immortality. " - James Joyce to Jacques Benoist-Mechin Last Thursday. A club room at the Quadrangle, a retirement community. A dozen well-thumbed copies of Ulysses lay around a long, wooden table. Retired lawyers, economists and homemakers sat behind them. Ann Evans, a 1940 graduate of Wellesley who brought up her three children in Wayne, sat at the table's head, preparing to launch into a presentation on "Nestor," the novel's second chapter.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
History offers many sad examples of the fate that can await the child of a genius, and the case of Lucia Joyce, the only daughter of James Joyce, is among the most tragic and painful. Lucia was persuaded that her artistic stature rivaled that of her father. As she insists in James Joyce Is Dead and So Is Paris: The Lucia Joyce Cabaret, "they say there can be only one genius in a family. As you can see, there were two in mine. " The character makes the claim from the secured ward of an English mental hospital that forms the setting for the Pig Iron Theatre Company's collaborative production.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
TO MANY of his co-workers at the Daily News, Jack McKinney was simply the most interesting person we ever had met. Equally versed in football and ballet, boxing and opera, a man who easily quoted Shakespeare, James Joyce and Looney Tunes, someone who actually knew what the war in El Salvador was about, McKinney's stories - the ones he wrote - were done with grace and wit. And the ones he spoke were delivered with the kind of timing befitting a...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty Philadelphians have signed up to read excerpts from James Joyce's novel Ulysses tomorrow from the steps of the Rosenbach Museum and Library, and a lot of Irish names are on the list. Names such as Conner (Lester), Dempsey (Deborah), Dewane (Patrick), Doran (Mary), Durkan (Michael), Ginty (James), Mahaffey (Vicki), McGreal (Austin and Margaret), Ryan (Patrick), Slattery (Thomas) and Whelan (Patrick). But you don't have to be Irish to love James Joyce. Among other names on the list are: Abraham (Lynne)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Although it's well-stocked with admirable performances, the second of the two one-act-play evenings on view at the People's Light and Theatre Company is shorter on nourishment than the first, which includes yeasty works by Pirandello and LeRoi Jones. By comparison with its partner, you might say, this quartet tastes great but is less filling. Both bills are part of the company's second annual Short Stuff Festival, which will include 16 different one-acts by the time its final program opens in mid-July.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2014 | By Raymond M. Lane, For The Inquirer
SLIGO, Ireland - "The landscape isn't, strictly speaking, necessary," said Helen Vendler of Harvard University. She has written about and teaches about Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet William Butler Yeats and other great writers and had some advice about the presumed pleasure of combining place with poetry - a lure to which all too many literary junkies fall prey. My librarian wife and I knew the wordy part about Ireland fairly well, and where to find some of its low-land temples.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Dubliners is one of the great books of the 20th century. " Bracing words from Colum McCann, a National Book Award-winning novelist ( Let the Great World Spin ). Sunday is the 100th anniversary of the publication of James Joyce's Dubliners , by the London house Grant Richards on June 15, 1914. It comes a day before Bloomsday, the day on which Joyce's Ulysses takes place. The Rosenbach Museum and Library is in the midst of a weeklong Bloomsday celebration (bit.ly/1kxQkrP)
TRAVEL
May 18, 2014 | By Raymond M. Lane, For The Inquirer
SLIGO, Ireland - "The landscape isn't, strictly speaking, necessary," said Helen Vendler of Harvard University. She has written about and teaches about Nobel Prize-winning Irish poet William Butler Yeats and other great writers and had some advice about the presumed pleasure of combining place with poetry - a lure to which all too many literary junkies fall prey. My librarian wife and I knew the wordy part about Ireland fairly well, and where to find some of its low-land temples.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stately, plump, a 1922 first edition of James Joyce's Ulysses sits in state at the Rosenbach Museum and Library. And right across from it, 310 yellow rubber gloves dangle from the ceiling in a concentric spiral, bearing, in black Sharpie, the entire text of Ulysses , starting with Stately, plump on Glove 1 and, right in the center, finishing with the word Yes   on the ring finger of Glove 310. It's called Thy Father's Spirit:...
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The language of Ulysses is its glory, but also its challenge. It ranges from the limpidly beautiful - "the heaventree of stars hung with humid nightblue fruit" - to the formidably opaque: "the like way is all hidden when we would backward see from what region of remoteness the whatness of our whoness hath fetched his whenceness. " David Butler, the education officer at Dublin's James Joyce Centre, says the book is "about how language surrounds us and conditions us . . . how we're within language.
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the 20th anniversary of the events in Ulysses - thought by many the greatest novel of the 20th century - James Joyce wrote this in his notebook: "Today, 16 of June 1924 twenty years after. Will anybody remember this date. " The suggestion of doubt is uncharacteristic. Joyce may often have been short of cash, but he was rarely short of self-confidence. As it happens, he need not have worried. On Wednesday, the centenary of "Bloomsday" - that fictional day in Dublin - will be celebrated in cities around the world.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
History offers many sad examples of the fate that can await the child of a genius, and the case of Lucia Joyce, the only daughter of James Joyce, is among the most tragic and painful. Lucia was persuaded that her artistic stature rivaled that of her father. As she insists in James Joyce Is Dead and So Is Paris: The Lucia Joyce Cabaret, "they say there can be only one genius in a family. As you can see, there were two in mine. " The character makes the claim from the secured ward of an English mental hospital that forms the setting for the Pig Iron Theatre Company's collaborative production.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
TO MANY of his co-workers at the Daily News, Jack McKinney was simply the most interesting person we ever had met. Equally versed in football and ballet, boxing and opera, a man who easily quoted Shakespeare, James Joyce and Looney Tunes, someone who actually knew what the war in El Salvador was about, McKinney's stories - the ones he wrote - were done with grace and wit. And the ones he spoke were delivered with the kind of timing befitting a...
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She danced with Brad Pitt in 12 Monkeys, emoted with Winona Ryder and Angelina Jolie in Girl, Interrupted, and appeared with Susan Lucci on All My Children. In a December Wilma Theater production, she did a Cockney-accented comic turn in a Tom Stoppard play. But of all the roles actress Drucie McDaniel has played in her more than 20-year career, the one that's grown closest to her heart is Molly Bloom, one of the characters in James Joyce's novel Ulysses. Saturday marks McDaniel's 10th year reading the part of Molly at the Rosenbach Library and Museum's annual Bloomsday event, set on the day (June 16)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Headlong Dance Theater's Ulysses doesn't aspire to do what James Joyce did, but to the way he did it: refracting a simple story through a barrage of styles and forms. Where in the novelist's modernist epic this yields a sense of the underlying mystery of each moment, Headlong's Ulysses (with the subtitle "Sly Uses of a Book by James Joyce") riffs on the endless complexities of trying to communicate that moment. This version, performed Friday and Saturday at Penn's Iron Gate Theater, has evolved a bit since its premiere last year, a first-of-its-kind Bloomsday commission by the Rosenbach Museum and Library.
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