CollectionsJames Mcbride
IN THE NEWS

James Mcbride

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
James McBride, a retired forklift operator who was active in his church and Masonry, died Friday. He was 74 and lived in North Philadelphia. McBride had been employed by Terminal Warehouse in Bellmawr, N.J., for 40 years, retiring in 1985. He was one of the founders and organizers of the McBride Family Reunion in the early 1970s, a family which has located some 300 descendants. The reunion, held every other year, was held last year in Baltimore and hosted about 150 family members.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
American society, says author and musician James McBride, sees him as a black man. But when he looks in the mirror, he sees only himself. "If I grew up in a truly color-blind society, I would not be a black American," McBride said. "I wrote this book [The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother] because I wanted people to see that our community is more than our differences. I've talked about this book to people around the world, black, white, Asian, short, tall, and literally I've met people who have had the same experiences growing up. " McBride, 41, the son of a white Jewish mother and a black Baptist minister, spoke this week to ninth through 12th grade students at the private, all-female Baldwin School.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
James McBride met Ed Shockley early in this decade when McBride, a tenor saxophonist by talent and inclination, was working a newspaper internship on the Wilmington News-Journal, and Shockley, a 6-foot-8 giant and former hoop star at Columbia, was dabbling in local theater. In due time they sat down and collaborated on a work of musical theater - music by McBride, book by Shockley. "All Roads Lead Home" debuted in the summer of '82 in the Black Theater Festival at Theater Center Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 12, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James McBride's The Color of Water, a black man's tribute to his Polish-Jewish mother, is the book Philadelphia wants people to talk about this year. Mayor Street is to announce today the selection of the 1996 best-seller, McBride's meditation on his "brown skin, curly hair and divided soul," as the centerpiece of the city's second One Book, One Philadelphia reading program. The 46-year-old writer and jazz saxophonist, who lives in Solebury, Bucks County, will talk and perform at several of more than 100 One Book, One Philadelphia events organized by the Philadelphia Free Library and held around the region through March 15. "It's a beautiful book, and very moving," said Elliot L. Shelkrot, the library director, who has ordered 5,000 paperback copies to be distributed to area schools and library branches.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Let's get right to the heart of the matter. "Bobos" is a wonderful show. "Bobos," dubbed a "street opera," is the inaugural attraction of the 10th-anniversary season of the American Music Theater Festival. It opened its world-premiere run last night at Plays and Players and will be there through April 11. "Bobos" perhaps has been the beneficiary of more pre-opening hype than any show since Howard Hughes dangled "The Outlaw" and Jane Russell's decolletage before a gullible American public in 1943.
LIVING
December 7, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When James McBride's mother read what her son had written about her, she wept. "She had a hard time with it. She cried and stayed in her room for a couple of days," recalled James McBride, author of The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother (Riverhead Books, $12). "Then, when she emerged, she said she was OK with it. And now, she's happy about it. " It's not surprising that Ruth McBride Jordan, now 76, would have a strong reaction to her son's best-selling book.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
RICHARD BEN CRAMER, an iconic journalist and author who won a Pulitzer Prize at the Inquirer for his vivid overseas reporting, died Monday evening in Baltimore after a battle with lung cancer. He was 62. Cramer, who'd been living on Maryland's Eastern Shore and had been working on a book about New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez in recent years, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, according to his close friend James McBride. Cramer's death was confirmed by family members to other news organizations late Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A note in the program for All Roads Lead Home says the show was first presented at the Black Theater Festival of 1981 (actually it was 1982) and that "after being critically praised it went on to a long, difficult career of disappointments. . . . " A check in The Inquirer's library relieved this critic of the fear that his review might have encouraged writer Ed Shockley and composer James McBride to take their work on to heartbreak. I didn't like All Roads Lead Home in 1982, and I don't like it now. The story of this drama with music is contrived, the writing is strained and flat, and the music is undistinguished.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1989 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
The 1989 Black Theater Festival's closing production, "All Roads Lead Home" is billed in turn as a "revisitation of the turbulent 1960s through the eyes of two cabaret singers" and a "musical examination" of the period. But don't expect a bombastic production full of heart-rending or show- stopping songs, belted out by a couple of middle-aged ladies who "remember when . . . " You get no freedom songs here. Or peace anthems. No incendiary revolutionary themes or psychedelic tunes.
NEWS
October 20, 2005 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clean those bifocals and plump up the easy chair. Soon, the city will get its annual reading assignment when Mayor Street announces the "One Book, One Philadelphia" literature selection for 2006. Only this year, it will be three books - none of them announced yet, but all of them about Ben Franklin. "He's a larger-than-life person, with so many facets, so many gifts," said Marie Field, who chairs the selection committee for the Free Library. "One book wouldn't do. " Deciding to focus on Franklin in the year of his 300th birthday was a no-brainer for the 30-member committee, a group of avid readers drawn from educators, corporations, government, the library and nonprofit groups.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holiday time for many of us still is book-giving time. So the call goes out - and people are really pounding me, assistant books editor, for recommendations. What's good? What do you recommend? Old, new, no matter? Why should I do all the work, though? Luckily, the Inquirer staff is full of readers, folks of discrimination and taste, of course. Here are their recommendations. Most prices are for hardbacks (but we know plenty of folks giving e-books). There's something below for almost any bibliophile, for Christmas or any other time.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
RICHARD BEN CRAMER, an iconic journalist and author who won a Pulitzer Prize at the Inquirer for his vivid overseas reporting, died Monday evening in Baltimore after a battle with lung cancer. He was 62. Cramer, who'd been living on Maryland's Eastern Shore and had been working on a book about New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez in recent years, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, according to his close friend James McBride. Cramer's death was confirmed by family members to other news organizations late Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Last summer's concert catastrophe occurred when Sugarland's stage collapsed in August, killing six, when a storm thrashed Indiana. On Saturday disaster struck in Toronto, where the stage collapsed before a Radiohead concert, killing Scott Johnson, the band's drum technician, who was trapped under the rubble. Three other people were injured. Officials from the Ontario Ministry of Labor searched through the wreckage for clues to the cause of the collapse. They were also investigating whether safety regulations and standards were followed and if staff were properly trained.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
If Spike Lee's Miracle at St. Anna were a symphony, you'd think, three sublime movements, a fourth that's turgid, and what's with the wacky coda? Adapted by James McBride from his best-seller, Miracle is, by turns, a dazzling, dim, lucid, confounding, absorbing, tedious, silly, profound, bloody and - 160 minutes and almost as many subplots later - bracing account of four African American infantrymen separated from their Buffalo Soldiers unit in Tuscany during World War II. The film opens in 1983 as one of the soldiers, Hector (Laz Alonso)
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
For Andy Kahan and Sara Goddard, director and associate director of author events at the Free Library's Central Branch, the second annual Philadelphia Book Festival this weekend will be an upbeat work in progress. "One of the things that we've learned is that it has a more populist orientation than we necessarily expected," said Kahan, referring to last year's debut that drew 25,000-plus visitors to the library's Parkway building and scores of booths and sponsor areas around it. "With the events that we do all year," he said, chatting about the festival, along with Goddard, in a library conference room this week, "we noticed that many of those folks did not show up for the book festival.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One Philadelphia business owner makes his views known with a sign reading, "This Is America. When Ordering Please Speak English. " Two towns in the region have laws intended to drive out illegal immigrants. On the statewide political trail, two Senate candidates swap heated words about immigration issues. The question of who belongs here and who doesn't, who is American and who isn't, is dominating much local and national debate. Which makes the latest selection for "One Book, One Philadelphia" all the more appropriate.
NEWS
October 20, 2005 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clean those bifocals and plump up the easy chair. Soon, the city will get its annual reading assignment when Mayor Street announces the "One Book, One Philadelphia" literature selection for 2006. Only this year, it will be three books - none of them announced yet, but all of them about Ben Franklin. "He's a larger-than-life person, with so many facets, so many gifts," said Marie Field, who chairs the selection committee for the Free Library. "One book wouldn't do. " Deciding to focus on Franklin in the year of his 300th birthday was a no-brainer for the 30-member committee, a group of avid readers drawn from educators, corporations, government, the library and nonprofit groups.
NEWS
February 13, 2004 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lorene Cary was a young writer struggling to write her first book when she found a lifeline at a local literary conference. As part of Philadelphia's annual Celebration of Black Writing, she had signed up for a workshop with an essayist she admired. "I walked out of there so encouraged," Cary said, "with such a sense that out of my confusion could come some prose that might be worthy of reading. " Cary, author of the memoir Black Ice and the novel The Price of a Child, is getting the chance to return the favor.
NEWS
January 12, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James McBride's The Color of Water, a black man's tribute to his Polish-Jewish mother, is the book Philadelphia wants people to talk about this year. Mayor Street is to announce today the selection of the 1996 best-seller, McBride's meditation on his "brown skin, curly hair and divided soul," as the centerpiece of the city's second One Book, One Philadelphia reading program. The 46-year-old writer and jazz saxophonist, who lives in Solebury, Bucks County, will talk and perform at several of more than 100 One Book, One Philadelphia events organized by the Philadelphia Free Library and held around the region through March 15. "It's a beautiful book, and very moving," said Elliot L. Shelkrot, the library director, who has ordered 5,000 paperback copies to be distributed to area schools and library branches.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|