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James Ramseur

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NEWS
May 18, 1987 | New York Daily News
Shooting victim James Ramseur is expected to testify for the prosecution today as the trial of subway gunman Bernhard Goetz resumes in Manhattan Supreme Court. His appearance will give prosecutor Gregory Waples a second victim's story to go along with Troy Canty's earlier testimony, as the state prepares to rest its case that Goetz used "unreasonable force" in wantonly shooting four 19- year-olds on a subway train more than two years ago. Goetz is being tried on charges of attempted murder.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | New York Daily News
A state board has ruled that one of the young men shot by Bernhard Goetz aboard a subway train two years ago was trying to rob him. The ruling by the Crime Victims Board is the first by any official body to support Goetz's claim that he shot four men in self-defense. Goetz is expected to go on trial next month for shooting the four, who have said that they innocently asked Goetz for $5. The board ruled after one of the four, Troy Canty, asked for compensation that is available from the state for victims of crimes.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By PATRICK CLARK and JOSEPH McNAMARA, New York Daily News
James Ramseur, who balked at testifying during an earlier appearance, told a Manhattan Supreme Court jury yesterday how he took a bullet in the chest as Bernhard Goetz rose from his subway seat, pistol belching at him and three cohorts on an errand of robbery. Ramseur, 21, said the youths were enroute to rob some video machines when his friend Troy Canty approached Goetz on an IRT train over two years ago. Ramseur, who is serving eight to 25 years for rape, robbery and sodomy, told prosecutor Gregory Waples he thought Canty was asking the time but that he could not hear because of the subway noise.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
The Trial of Bernhard Goetz, tonight's new edition of American Playhouse (Ch. 12, 9 p.m.), is an amazing, unsettling event. This presentation is just what its title says: a dramatization of the trial of Goetz, the New York electrical engineer who shot four young men in a Manhattan subway car on Dec. 22, 1984, after they had asked him for money. What in theory sounds tedious - a 2 1/2-hour dramatization of the Goetz trial transcript - is in practice a hynotizing set piece. Director Harry Moses has whittled down 4,600 pages of trial transcript.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A judge yesterday dismissed attempted-murder and assault charges against subway gunman Bernhard Goetz, saying the grand jury that indicted him was improperly instructed on his right to self-defense. Justice Stephen Crane of the state Supreme Court filed a 35-page brief dismissing the four attempted-murder charges and four counts of assault against Goetz, who became known as the "subway vigilante" for shooting four youths who he feared were about to rob him on a subway train when they asked for $5 on Dec. 22, 1984.
NEWS
June 21, 1987
DEC. 22, 1984: An unidentified gunman opens fire on a crowded Manhattan subway car, wounding four Bronx teens. A conductor halts the train and the gunman disappears down the tracks. Dec. 23, 1984: Witnesses report that youths were harassing and possibly trying to rob the man. Police form a Vigilante Task Force. Dec. 31, 1984: After nine days on the run, a 37-year-old Manhattan electronics engineer named Bernhard Hugo Goetz turns himself in to police in Concord, N.H., and makes detailed, taped statements about the shootings.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in his life, Bernhard Goetz found himself in the same place as Troy Canty yesterday. They hardly looked at one another. The first time was the afternoon of Dec. 22, 1984, when the 18-year-old Bronx drug addict and petty thief walked over to Goetz in a subway car and either "asked" for (Canty's story) or "demanded" (Goetz's story) $5. This time it was in a jammed, fifth-floor courtroom in lower Manhattan where Goetz is on trial for attempted murder and other crimes in the subsequent shootings of Canty and three other Bronx youths.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense rested yesterday in the five-week-old trial of accused "subway vigilante" Bernhard Goetz without the 39-year-old electronics engineer being called to the witness stand. "The jury already sees and understands that there is no case here," attorney Barry Slotnick said afterward. "There is no reason to put Bernie Goetz on the stand. He has already been seen by the jury in his most tender moment. " Slotnick was referring to the playing during the trial's opening weeks of a pair of gut-wrenching taped statements Goetz made to police nine days after the Dec. 22, 1984, shootings of four Bronx youths on a crowded subway car. Prosecutor Gregory Waples has argued that Goetz's admissions on the tapes - including that he intended "to murder them" and to "hurt them as much as possible" - almost single-handedly proved the state's case.
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
Bernhard Goetz is back in the news. You remember him. He's the fella who gained fame as "the subway vigilante" in the city of New York. He stuck a loaded gun in his belt and went underground. It was 1:40 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 22, 1984. Four thugs, blacks, approached Goetz, who is white, on the train. One of the hoodlums, Troy Canty, asked Goetz for $5. Goetz seemed agreeable. "I have five for each of you," he said. Then he reached for the loaded gun in his belt and shot Canty in the chest.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Subway gunman Bernhard Goetz, cleared of all but one charge in the notorious shootings of four black youths, wants only to return to the private life he led before the case forced him into the spotlight. "I'm glad it's over," Goetz, who could avoid imprisonment or be jailed up to seven years, told the limousine driver who sped him from the courthouse. "The last two years have been hell. " The shooting attracted worldwide attention and sparked national debate on self-defense, crime, vigilantism and the right to carry guns.
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NEWS
May 11, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
The Trial of Bernhard Goetz, tonight's new edition of American Playhouse (Ch. 12, 9 p.m.), is an amazing, unsettling event. This presentation is just what its title says: a dramatization of the trial of Goetz, the New York electrical engineer who shot four young men in a Manhattan subway car on Dec. 22, 1984, after they had asked him for money. What in theory sounds tedious - a 2 1/2-hour dramatization of the Goetz trial transcript - is in practice a hynotizing set piece. Director Harry Moses has whittled down 4,600 pages of trial transcript.
NEWS
June 21, 1987
DEC. 22, 1984: An unidentified gunman opens fire on a crowded Manhattan subway car, wounding four Bronx teens. A conductor halts the train and the gunman disappears down the tracks. Dec. 23, 1984: Witnesses report that youths were harassing and possibly trying to rob the man. Police form a Vigilante Task Force. Dec. 31, 1984: After nine days on the run, a 37-year-old Manhattan electronics engineer named Bernhard Hugo Goetz turns himself in to police in Concord, N.H., and makes detailed, taped statements about the shootings.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The initial news reports on Dec. 22, 1984, described a seemingly crazed gunman who opened up on a crowded subway train. Within a day, the portrait had changed. The mysterious gunman, who had disappeared down the tracks that Saturday afternoon, now was portrayed as the victim of the incident - a tall, blond man who had been harassed by rowdy, black teens and answered with bullets. Word began to leak out: Two of the youths were carrying weapons (screwdrivers), and they had admitted to approaching the mystery gunman to ask for money.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Subway gunman Bernhard Goetz, cleared of all but one charge in the notorious shootings of four black youths, wants only to return to the private life he led before the case forced him into the spotlight. "I'm glad it's over," Goetz, who could avoid imprisonment or be jailed up to seven years, told the limousine driver who sped him from the courthouse. "The last two years have been hell. " The shooting attracted worldwide attention and sparked national debate on self-defense, crime, vigilantism and the right to carry guns.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Subway gunman Bernhard Goetz was acquitted yesterday of all major charges in the shooting of four black youths on a Manhattan subway more than two years ago. In a case that attracted worldwide attention and sparked a national debate over crime and the right to self-defense, the jury found Goetz guilty of only one minor weapons charge, illegally possessing the gun he used in the shootings. Goetz, who became known as the "subway vigilante," was ordered to appear for sentencing Sept.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense rested yesterday in the five-week-old trial of accused "subway vigilante" Bernhard Goetz without the 39-year-old electronics engineer being called to the witness stand. "The jury already sees and understands that there is no case here," attorney Barry Slotnick said afterward. "There is no reason to put Bernie Goetz on the stand. He has already been seen by the jury in his most tender moment. " Slotnick was referring to the playing during the trial's opening weeks of a pair of gut-wrenching taped statements Goetz made to police nine days after the Dec. 22, 1984, shootings of four Bronx youths on a crowded subway car. Prosecutor Gregory Waples has argued that Goetz's admissions on the tapes - including that he intended "to murder them" and to "hurt them as much as possible" - almost single-handedly proved the state's case.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By PATRICK CLARK and JOSEPH McNAMARA, New York Daily News
James Ramseur, who balked at testifying during an earlier appearance, told a Manhattan Supreme Court jury yesterday how he took a bullet in the chest as Bernhard Goetz rose from his subway seat, pistol belching at him and three cohorts on an errand of robbery. Ramseur, 21, said the youths were enroute to rob some video machines when his friend Troy Canty approached Goetz on an IRT train over two years ago. Ramseur, who is serving eight to 25 years for rape, robbery and sodomy, told prosecutor Gregory Waples he thought Canty was asking the time but that he could not hear because of the subway noise.
NEWS
May 18, 1987 | New York Daily News
Shooting victim James Ramseur is expected to testify for the prosecution today as the trial of subway gunman Bernhard Goetz resumes in Manhattan Supreme Court. His appearance will give prosecutor Gregory Waples a second victim's story to go along with Troy Canty's earlier testimony, as the state prepares to rest its case that Goetz used "unreasonable force" in wantonly shooting four 19- year-olds on a subway train more than two years ago. Goetz is being tried on charges of attempted murder.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in his life, Bernhard Goetz found himself in the same place as Troy Canty yesterday. They hardly looked at one another. The first time was the afternoon of Dec. 22, 1984, when the 18-year-old Bronx drug addict and petty thief walked over to Goetz in a subway car and either "asked" for (Canty's story) or "demanded" (Goetz's story) $5. This time it was in a jammed, fifth-floor courtroom in lower Manhattan where Goetz is on trial for attempted murder and other crimes in the subsequent shootings of Canty and three other Bronx youths.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A jury will convene tomorrow morning in a faded, dust-flocked Manhattan courtroom to sit in judgment of Bernhard Hugo Goetz, the half-forgotten "subway vigilante. " Twenty-eight months after the skinny, bespectacled electronics repairman became an international celebrity by gunning down a quartet of Bronx teenagers, four women and eight men are set to decide whether he acted criminally or in self-defense. The legal strategies are fairly straightforward: The defense will attempt to convince the jury that Goetz's actions were justified by his fear of being robbed by the youths, fueled by latent anxiety over a violent mugging he had suffered four years earlier.
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