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James Stockdale

NEWS
October 2, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services Compiled by staff writer Ron Goldwyn from the Associated Press and other news services
He's back - pesky and defiant as ever, ready to spend, ready to roll - and mired at 7 percent in the latest poll. In the heady days of May and June, Ross Perot was a potential president. Now, he's likely no more than potential spoiler, but nonetheless a wild card who could reshuffle the deck in the campaign's closing weeks. The Perot Factor was reintroduced yesterday, 33 days before the election and 77 days after the Texas billionaire abandoned plans to run, saying he had concluded he could not win. Despite Perot's announcement in Dallas yesterday that he is now an active candidate, the odds are even slimmer.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The table is set: a staccato burst of four debates in nine days, featuring three-candidate showdowns that are unprecedented in modern presidential campaigns. That is what the negotiators for President Bush and Democrat Bill Clinton have cooked up for the American electorate, starting next Sunday night. The question is, will it matter? Can Bush do anything to scratch Clinton's Teflon lead? And how will Ross Perot, the wildest wildcard in politics for quite a while, change the dynamics?
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now that was a debate. Freed from the constraints of the traditional debate format, Vice President Quayle and Democrat Al Gore went after each other with a vengeance, creating a confrontation that was always lively, often combative, occasionally mean- spirited. Quayle gave a performance that was animated, sometimes to the point of being frenetic, playing the time-honored vice presidential campaign role of hatchet man. Despite the edge in his voice, he succeeded in hammering home the charge on which the Republicans are pinning their fading hopes, that Democrat Bill Clinton lacks the character to lead the nation.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Excerpts from last night's vice presidential debate: Moderator Hal Bruno: What role would each of you like to play as vice president; what areas interest you, and what are your qualifications to serve as president, if necessary? Vice President Quayle: I've done the job. I've done many things for the President. But even as vice president, you never know exactly what your role is going to be from time to time. And let me just give you an example of where I was tested under fire and in a crisis.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | By Charles Green and Katharine Seelye, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The presidential campaign took on a new urgency yesterday as President Bush and Democratic challenger Bill Clinton tried to cope with the resurgence of independent Ross Perot. "For nine days, you'll see a battle for the spirit of America," a pumped- up Clinton told supporters here. "We have 20,000 volunteers listed here in Michigan for Election Day, but we could use a few more. " A determined Bush left the White House yesterday for nine days of nonstop campaigning. He was joined by chief of staff James A. Baker 3d, who was brought to the White House in the summer to help propel the troubled campaign.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is the one. Tonight's long-awaited, first-of-three presidential debates provides a moment George Bush must seize. For the President, running far behind Bill Clinton in the polls, the hour may already be too late. But if Bush is to make a move, politicians say, he must do so now, the only time in this year's sequence of debates when a huge television audience is sure to be watching. "If President Bush doesn't do exceedingly well (tonight) and in subsequent debates, this thing may be over," said Michael S. Dukakis, the Democrats' 1988 presidential nominee, offering an opinion shared by many Republicans.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Darrell Hammond, who plays Al Gore as a cross between the nutty professor and Frankenstein on downers, worries about this election. "Until this year, I had never, ever had anyone take me seriously," he said in a telephone interview Tuesday. "It was just a comic act. It was all jokes, and the whole idea was to laugh and have fun. " But a lot of people are saying that Hammond and his Saturday Night Live colleague Will Ferrell, who does George W. Bush as an overgrown boy trying desperately to move an idea into the vacant expanses of his brain, could influence which real politician is elected in a tight race.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | By Kristin Huckshorn and Charles Green, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Vice President Quayle and Sen. Al Gore of Tennessee tangled in an aggressive, free-form debate last night that featured sharp attacks on the economic policies, character and trustworthiness of President Bush and Bill Clinton. The pair stayed on the offensive throughout the 90-minute vice presidential debate. Quayle portrayed Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, as a flip- flopping, tax-and-spend liberal who "has trouble telling the truth. " Gore hit Bush as a failed president who cares more about foreign affairs than the economic well-being of the American people.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By David Hess and Mary Voboril, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Kristin Huckshorn and R.A. Zaldivar of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article, as did Inquirer wire services
Running on adrenalin and sheer willpower, President Bush and Bill Clinton kept up their attacks on each other yesterday, as both were confronted with controversies they would rather have avoided. With two days of campaigning left, a report in the Washington Times reopened the controversy over Clinton's efforts to avoid military service during the Vietnam War. And the Bush campaign was dogged by continuing allegations that the President - contrary to what he has said - was indeed aware that a 1986 arms deal with Iran involved a trade for U.S. hostages in Lebanon.
NEWS
October 17, 1992
SUPPORT OF GOV. FLORIO AND HIS IDEAS DRAWS FIRE The Oct. 10 editorial, "Amazing gall," demands a response. New Jersey changed its legislature in response to an arrogant government that did not listen to its people. Gov. Florio will also be gone at the end of his term. What is amazing, is your gall. Your continued praise of a power-hungry governor and attacks on a newly elected legislature fly in the face of what the people of New Jersey want. The Inquirer continues to sing praises to ideas that no longer have any value in New Jersey.
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