CollectionsJames Taylor
IN THE NEWS

James Taylor

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Who were all those unfamiliar faces at the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Monday night? The answer, of course, lies in the fact that few of the 2,900 or so people who helped sell out the Academy of Music thought they were at a Philadelphia Orchestra concert. They thought they were at a James Taylor concert. And so they were. "This is fascinating," said one orchestra board member to another at the concert, referring to the obviously younger than usual audience. "This is what we need to tap into," the other said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011
An assistant for accomplished skier-singer-songwriter James Taylor says that Taylor fractured his left fibula and injured his left shoulder in a fall Monday on an expert trail while on a family vacation in Park City, Utah. Taylor was treated at a hospital - good thing he wasn't patched up on the slopes by a St. Bernard - and had a doctor fashion a movable splint that he hopes will fit in his boot and allow him to ski later in the week. Taylor, who lives in Massachusetts, said that, given all the problems in the world, his mishap was "nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The title song of James Taylor's new album, Never Die Young (Columbia ), is one of those I'm-a-survivor lyrics you'd expect would be awfully maudlin - instead, it's one of Taylor's most succinct and mature statements. He wants his fans to know that he's in it for the long haul, and for once, even we non-fans can appreciate his ideas. The music here is as richly melodic as anything he has recorded since 1977's JT. Kool Moe Dee How Ya Like Me Now (Jive/RCA ): Rap music sustained for a full album is rare indeed, and this tour de force also serves as a mini- history of the genre, from its roots in James Brown (the title song)
LIVING
January 15, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was an especially merry holiday season for James Taylor and Caroline "Kim" Smedvig, an executive with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The singer-songwriter proposed to Smedvig on Christmas Eve at their home in Brookline, Mass., giving her an antique diamond ring from Tiffany's, said Jessica Kusmin, their personal assistant. "I was very touched and charmed by how traditional and romantic it was," Smedvig said. The marriage will be Smedvig's second and Taylor's third. They have not yet set a date.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010
8:30 tonight CHANNEL 12 Carole King (left) and James Taylor (right) perform at the L.A. nightclub in a 2007 concert. Included: King's "So Far Away" and "It's Too Late"; Taylor's "Carolina in My Mind" and "Sweet Baby James. "
NEWS
July 23, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
In a word, the music of James Taylor is nice. It's all about that peaceful, easy feeling: blue jeans, snuggling by the fire, strawberry daiquiris, and holding hands on the beach at sunset. This is music that speaks to people, and there were more than 20,000 of them Friday night at the Tweeter Center. James Taylor looked at their smiling faces, in a crowd that stretched from the front row all the way to the top of the lawn, and declared that they were pretty nice, too. "Thanks for coming, folks.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
The beverage of choice at the Mann Music Center last night was the strawberry smoothie on sale at the concession stands. The fruit concoction - tangy, yet sweet and refreshing - was the perfect accompaniment to the heartening blend of songs that James Taylor brought to the stage. The singer shuffled out in suspenders and work pants, shrugging bashfully at the applause that greeted him. Then he put on a glorious show that made his humility seem misplaced indeed. The most touching moments came on "Close Your Eyes," "Walkin' Man," "Only a Dream in Rio," and other of Taylor's haunting, blues-hued folk compositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1995 | By Bruce Warren, FOR THE INQUIRER
How easy can easy-listening music get before it drifts into the somnolent world of Muzak? Quite easy, was the answer offered by James Taylor and his band with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Marvin Hamlisch on Thursday night at the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden. Hamlisch and the Pittsburgh Pops opened the show with a half-hour of Broadway hits, including songs from A Chorus Line, and a musical tribute to Barbra Streisand, after which Hamlisch welcomed Taylor to the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Larry Carlton and the Yellowjackets are at the Academy of Music on Sunday. Carlton, formerly of the Crusaders, has established a pattern of alternating acoustic and electric albums. At his concerts, this extraordinary guitarist - he has done memorable session work for Steely Dan, Joni Mitchell and many others - manages to explore both facets of his technique. New addition Kirk Whalum has been given a latitude unusual for Carlton sidemen to display his chops on saxophone. The Yellowjackets may be the most satisfyingly unified and talented ensemble working in the fusion field.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
A landmark comedy special by Bob Newhart, a beguiling musical hour by James Taylor, and probably the best documentary ever done about tornadoes brighten cable television tonight. Newhart, best-known as the star of TV situation comedies, returns to his roots as a hit act on record albums in Bob Newhart: Off the Record. He visually re-enacts nine of the verbal routines that first made him a major comedian. Taylor, one of the most enduring of folk singers, delivers 14 numbers in James Taylor: Going Home.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | A.D. Amorosi, For the Inquirer
When veteran Brit music makers Peter Asher and Albert Lee played Sellersville Theater Sunday, they did two truly rare things. The first was making visit a matinee, a delightful afternoon for which even Asher was unprepared. "I normally have one of these after 10 p.m. when we usually finish," he said, signaling a cold martini while wondering if perhaps a spot of tea might be more appropriate. The second rarity was that the pair spoke at length - even more than they sang and played - winsomely, and in depth about their illustrious pasts.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | by Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the high-stakes conflict over U.S. climate-change policy, groups that deny or cast doubt on global warming brought in $7.2 billion from 2003 through 2010 - less than a third of it publicly traceable to the donors. In a recently released study of 91 such organizations, a Drexel University professor found that $5.2 billion of their funding was "dark money" from undisclosed sources. Also of unknown origin: $78 million channeled by major benefactors through a special nonprofit that then redirected the money while keeping the givers' identities private.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | Inquirer Staff Writers
The bangs have bung; the sweep is swept. Michelle Obama wowed the world in January, when she debuted her bangs at hub Barack Obama's second presidential inauguration. But that was so five months ago. Lately, the First Female has been calling her bangs "irritating," and Friday, at a commencement at Maryland's Bowie State University, she had a longer, wavy hairstyle, with the grown-out bangs swept to the side. Nice.   Beyoncé, fertile! As in preggers! E!Online was "confirming" Friday, via Multiple Sources , that Beyoncé 's long-rumored inhabitation by a small human is indeed a fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012
James Taylor With his more than 50 million albums sold and five Grammy Awards, it doesn't much matter if James Taylor hasn't had a hit single in years: He doesn't need one. As his multigenerational legion of fans knows, the 64-year-old troubadour makes his musical connection most strongly onstage. This time out, though, there's no new record, no Carole King, no concert agenda at all; just his decades' worth of songs. Taylor, whose warm, reedy baritone can soothe even the most angst-ridden heart, is joined for his summer tour by an 11-member band that includes horns, percussion, keyboards, fiddle, and a bevy of backing singers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011
An assistant for accomplished skier-singer-songwriter James Taylor says that Taylor fractured his left fibula and injured his left shoulder in a fall Monday on an expert trail while on a family vacation in Park City, Utah. Taylor was treated at a hospital - good thing he wasn't patched up on the slopes by a St. Bernard - and had a doctor fashion a movable splint that he hopes will fit in his boot and allow him to ski later in the week. Taylor, who lives in Massachusetts, said that, given all the problems in the world, his mishap was "nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
OK, boomers: How do you know you've become your parents? When you look at the lengthy lineup of music specials that PBS (and, locally, WHYY-TV12) is tossing out as lures for its March Madness fundraising campaign, and most of 'em make you smile and say, "Wow, they're finally on my wavelength. " As a rule, PBS skews older in demographic appeal than the average TV network, getting the bulk of its fundraising bucks from folks in the 50-plus and even 60-plus demographics. That's why you used to see so many fund-drive specials built around doo-wop acts of the '50s and '60s, or those bubbly Champagne Music Makers of "The Lawrence Welk Show.
NEWS
June 12, 2010 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just four songs into their show at the sold-out Wachovia Center on Thursday night, James Taylor got the age joke out of the way. He and Carole King, he said, "were trying to remember what was in the original set when we played the Troubadour in 1903. " Yes, the two iconic artists who helped set the template for the singer-songwriter movement of the 1970s are long in the tooth - King is 68 and Taylor 62. They actually first played the Troubadour, the storied Los Angeles club, in 1970, the year they began their enduring friendship and artistic collaboration.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010
8:30 tonight CHANNEL 12 Carole King (left) and James Taylor (right) perform at the L.A. nightclub in a 2007 concert. Included: King's "So Far Away" and "It's Too Late"; Taylor's "Carolina in My Mind" and "Sweet Baby James. "
NEWS
June 3, 2008 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
No "Fire and Rain"? Does James Taylor's not playing that 1970 breakthrough single constitute a deal-breaker for attendees of a JT show? It remains his signature tune, an autobiographical processing of psychiatric-hospital stays, substance abuse, band breakup, suicide; and it's got that chorus-clincher "But I always thought that I'd see you again" which resonated so poignantly at, say, the post-9/11 Concert for New York City. And sure, it was missed at Taylor's two-hour, two-set show Sunday night at the Mann Center - but the JT faithful are an easygoing lot, and the singer-songwriter doled out many other crowd-pleasing cuts.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|