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James Thompson

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NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ingredients were all too familiar: a packed Old City nightspot, alcohol, men with short tempers, and one with a gun. So was the result: one dead, his brother paralyzed, and for James Thompson, a prison cell for the next 17 to 34 years. "It's a recipe for disaster," Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi told Thompson at Friday's sentencing. "If you didn't walk in there with that gun, this would never have happened, because if you didn't have a gun, you would never have talked to them the way that you did," said the judge, referring to the size of the late Scoey Potter and brothers Jermaine and Brian.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The three Potter brothers and a friend were relaxing near the bar in the crowded Bleu Martini nightclub in the early hours of Feb. 20 when James Thompson tried to walk by, but stopped when, he later claimed, one brother blocked his way. Within the hour, Scoey Potter, 33, would be lying on an Old City street with bullets in his neck and an arm. Jermaine Potter, 29, would be next to him, a bullet under both sides of his rib cage. Brian Potter, 23, would be left to help police piece together how a bar dustup had become yet another Philadelphia murder case.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ingredients were all there: crowded, popular Old City night spot; men with short tempers; ill-chosen words; and a gun. The volatile mixture Feb. 20 at the Bleu Martini ended with Jermaine Potter in a wheelchair, his brother Scoey dead, and, as of Tuesday, James Thompson headed for trial. Thompson, 27, of South Philadelphia, was held on charges of murder, assault, and gun violations after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Court Judge Kenneth J. Powell Jr. Potter and another brother, Brian, testified about the altercation, which took place about 12:30 a.m. at the night spot at Second and Market Streets.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers
Anger got the better of Selina Richardson, 31, and her 64-year-old husband, James Thompson, early yesterday. And Richardson's 12-year-old son was there to watch the chilling consequence. The domestic dispute in a house on Woodstock Street near Medary Avenue in Oak Lane turned ugly around 2 a.m. yesterday. Thompson, police said, fatally shot Richardson in the chest with a .32- caliber handgun after a struggle over the gun. Charles Watts, Richardson's 12-year-old son, witnessed the slaying.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Rick Callahan, Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Hijackers like those who crashed planes in New York, at the Pentagon, and in Pennsylvania on 9/11 could still get state IDs today despite efforts to create uniform standards for identification, a member of the panel that examined the 2001 terror attacks said Thursday. The 9/11 commission called for federal identification standards, but those haven't succeeded because of civil-liberties concerns and states' desire to guard their own processes, said former Illinois Gov. James Thompson, who served on the commission.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ingredients were all there: crowded, popular Old City night spot; men with short tempers; ill-chosen words; and a gun. The volatile mixture Feb. 20 at the Bleu Martini ended with Jermaine Potter in a wheelchair, his brother Scoey dead, and, as of Tuesday, James Thompson headed for trial. Thompson, 27, of South Philadelphia, was held on charges of murder, assault, and gun violations after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Court Judge Kenneth J. Powell Jr. Potter and another brother, Brian, testified about the altercation, which took place about 12:30 a.m. at the night spot at Second and Market Streets.
SPORTS
April 24, 1987 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tall and thin and regal, James Thompson surveyed the field like a baron admiring his estate. Then he stepped into the pocket, spotted an open receiver and fired a 40- yard strike through the middle of the defense. Touchdown. Ah, yes, it was the kind of sweet, uplifting moment he had been anticipating throughout his college career. OK, it was only spring practice. But for the first time since his high school days, practice is a prelude to playing, not to sitting on the bench, for Thompson.
SPORTS
October 7, 1987 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was going to be James Thompson's season at Temple. He was going to sparkle after three interminable years as the restless backup to quarterback Lee Saltz. But now that he's the starter, Thompson has discovered that the view from the driver's seat is a little different. It took him a long, long time to get there, and now - to hear him tell it - it is taking him a long, long time to feel comfortable. "It's a little slower than I had hoped," Thompson said yesterday. "I didn't come out expecting to complete every pass I threw.
SPORTS
September 4, 1987 | By Mike Bruton, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is no hesitation in James Thompson's voice when he talks about leading the Temple Owls into the 1987 football season. He appears to be beyond readiness. Thompson, a senior quarterback, sat for three years behind Lee Saltz waiting for his call to battle. He learned patience. And a patient man, once unleashed, often goes forth with a fury. Saltz, who is fighting for a spot on the Detroit Lions' roster, is gone. And an offense that relied on Heisman Trophy runner-up Paul Palmer 70 percent of the time is now in Thompson's hands.
SPORTS
October 27, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Starting quarterback James Thompson has left the Temple University football team as quietly as he waited four years in the wings for a chance to play regularly. Thompson, a fifth-year senior, informed coach Bruce Arians of the decision yesterday morning and then was unavailable for comment. Thompson's whereabouts remained unknown to teammates in Peabody Hall, the campus dormitory that houses most of the Temple football players, into the wee hours. The Tallahassee, Fla., native, inconsistent in his first year as a starter with the 3-4 Owls, first approached Arians last Tuesday to say that he was considering leaving the squad.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JIM THOMPSON was growing up in South Philadelphia, he worked for a time at a newsstand across the street from his home on 24th Street. It was there that he developed an abiding interest in current events, digesting the headlines and stories in the local papers of the happenings of his day. He carried this interest through his life, and always enjoyed engaging family and friends in discussions of what was going on in the world, including the...
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ingredients were all too familiar: a packed Old City nightspot, alcohol, men with short tempers, and one with a gun. So was the result: one dead, his brother paralyzed, and for James Thompson, a prison cell for the next 17 to 34 years. "It's a recipe for disaster," Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi told Thompson at Friday's sentencing. "If you didn't walk in there with that gun, this would never have happened, because if you didn't have a gun, you would never have talked to them the way that you did," said the judge, referring to the size of the late Scoey Potter and brothers Jermaine and Brian.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Rick Callahan, Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Hijackers like those who crashed planes in New York, at the Pentagon, and in Pennsylvania on 9/11 could still get state IDs today despite efforts to create uniform standards for identification, a member of the panel that examined the 2001 terror attacks said Thursday. The 9/11 commission called for federal identification standards, but those haven't succeeded because of civil-liberties concerns and states' desire to guard their own processes, said former Illinois Gov. James Thompson, who served on the commission.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By MENSAH M. DEAN, deanm@phillynews.com 215-854-5949
The three Potter brothers and a friend were relaxing near the bar in the crowded Bleu Martini nightclub in the early hours of Feb. 20 when James Thompson tried to walk by, but stopped when, he later claimed, one brother blocked his way. Within the hour, Scoey Potter, 33, would be lying on an Old City street with bullets in his neck and an arm. Jermaine Potter, 29, would be next to him, a bullet under both sides of his rib cage. Brian Potter, 23, would be left to help police piece together how a bar dustup had become yet another Philadelphia murder case.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ingredients were all there: crowded, popular Old City night spot; men with short tempers; ill-chosen words; and a gun. The volatile mixture Feb. 20 at the Bleu Martini ended with Jermaine Potter in a wheelchair, his brother Scoey dead, and, as of Tuesday, James Thompson headed for trial. Thompson, 27, of South Philadelphia, was held on charges of murder, assault, and gun violations after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Court Judge Kenneth J. Powell Jr. Potter and another brother, Brian, testified about the altercation, which took place about 12:30 a.m. at the night spot at Second and Market Streets.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ingredients were all there: crowded, popular Old City night spot; men with short tempers; ill-chosen words; and a gun. The volatile mixture Feb. 20 at the Bleu Martini ended with Jermaine Potter in a wheelchair, his brother Scoey dead, and, as of Tuesday, James Thompson headed for trial. Thompson, 27, of South Philadelphia, was held on charges of murder, assault, and gun violations after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Court Judge Kenneth J. Powell Jr. Potter and another brother, Brian, testified about the altercation, which took place about 12:30 a.m. at the night spot at Second and Market Streets.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers
Anger got the better of Selina Richardson, 31, and her 64-year-old husband, James Thompson, early yesterday. And Richardson's 12-year-old son was there to watch the chilling consequence. The domestic dispute in a house on Woodstock Street near Medary Avenue in Oak Lane turned ugly around 2 a.m. yesterday. Thompson, police said, fatally shot Richardson in the chest with a .32- caliber handgun after a struggle over the gun. Charles Watts, Richardson's 12-year-old son, witnessed the slaying.
NEWS
November 21, 1988 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
James J. "Peter Rabbit" Thompson Jr., who never met a man he didn't like to give money to, died Wednesday. He was 44 and lived in the Fishtown section of the city. Actually, Peter Rabbit would give money to women and children, too. He also gave people his time and attention and did personal favors. He bought vestments for the church. He was a 5-foot-11, 255-pound marshmallow swathed in a double-knit sportcoat, and everyone in Fishtown knew "The Rabbit" was easy. A bachelor with little family left in recent years, he became a self- appointed public servant in Fishtown, which on a good day could cost plenty, recalled a lifelong friend, Ray Lederer.
SPORTS
October 27, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Starting quarterback James Thompson has left the Temple University football team as quietly as he waited four years in the wings for a chance to play regularly. Thompson, a fifth-year senior, informed coach Bruce Arians of the decision yesterday morning and then was unavailable for comment. Thompson's whereabouts remained unknown to teammates in Peabody Hall, the campus dormitory that houses most of the Temple football players, into the wee hours. The Tallahassee, Fla., native, inconsistent in his first year as a starter with the 3-4 Owls, first approached Arians last Tuesday to say that he was considering leaving the squad.
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