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Jamestown

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NEWS
May 11, 2007 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The "Eureka!" moment, as Bill Kelso recalls it, occurred in June 1994, when he discovered post holes forming an outline of the long-lost fort built by the Jamestown settlers. What he really found, though he didn't realize it then, was the key to understanding the American idea, unraveling a mystery that had been buried for nearly four centuries and changing everything for true believers in the Jamestown saga. Through the three-sided, palisaded structure and the nearly one million artifacts unearthed at the site, a story could be told of 104 immigrants determined to survive and succeed - a counterargument to scholars who portrayed a colony of indolent Englishmen, decimated by disease and famine, reduced to extorting food from the Indians and eating rats and, eventually, one another.
SPORTS
October 13, 2002 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Hatboro-Horsham girls' team travels five miles just to practice on William Tennent's hilly cross-country course, and Jamestown of Williamsburg, Va., drives more than five hours one way to race at the William Tennent Invitational. Now in its 47th year, the meet is the longest continuously held cross-country invitational in Pennsylvania, according to meet director Ted Abel. It offers something for everybody, with varsity, junior varsity and novice races. This year, it also provided an athletic outlet for two teams on alert due to the sniper attacks in the Washington area.
NEWS
August 23, 2007 | Seymour I. Toll
Seymour I. Toll is a Philadelphia lawyer This is the 400th anniversary of two pioneering efforts to establish English colonies in America: Jamestown in Virginia and Popham Colony (Fort St. George) at the mouth of the Kennebec River on Maine's mid-coast. Although nearly abandoned in 1610, Jamestown survived to become the first successful English colony in America. Its culminating celebration in May included Queen Elizabeth II and President and Laura Bush. Maine's village of Popham in the town of Phippsburg (2000 census of 2,106 people)
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Ralph Vigoda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dusk was settling on Roanoke Island when Englishman John White stepped onto land and stepped into a mystery that has gone unsolved for four centuries. White and his sailors who came ashore that August day in 1590 found remains of a log fire and footprints. What they didn't find was any trace of the men, women and children White had left behind three years earlier to establish a colony in the New World, one that predated Jamestown by 20 years. It was here - in what was then part of the vast territory of Virginia - that White's granddaughter, Virginia Dare, had become the first English child born in the colonies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the opening moments of The New World an ominous thunderclap silences the birdsong, signaling the arrival of English colonists in Powhatan country (now Virginia) in 1607. Can the native Powhatans, who tread lightly on the bountiful land, coexist with the English, who deforest acres to build Jamestown colony? Terrence Malick's ravishing film, a meditation on America's foundation myth, centers on the encounter between Powhatan princess Pocahontas (Q'orianka Kilcher) and English adventurer John Smith (Colin Farrell)
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here are some of the writings and quotes cited by those who have questioned Patrick J. Buchanan's views on blacks, Jews, immigrants and women: "I think God made all people good, but if we had to take a million immigrants in, say Zulus, next year, or Englishmen, and put them in Virginia, what group would be easier to assimilate and would cause less problems for the people of Virginia?" From ABC News' This Week With David Brinkley, 1991. Women "are simply not endowed by nature with the same measures of single-minded ambition and the will to succeed in the fiercely competitive world of Western capitalism.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | By Gary Farrugia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia may be the birthplace of the nation, but this is where the United States was conceived. In Williamsburg, America's earliest political superstars (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and George Mason) shaped the debates that led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. From 1699 until 1780, Williamsburg was the capital of the influential Virginia Colony, a major social and cultural center rivaling Philadelphia, Boston and New York in prestige.
SPORTS
January 4, 1993 | By Nick Fierro, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ron Rainey learned what it felt like to lose on the wrestling mat last season. He learned it early and often - 15 times in his 20 matches, to be exact. But it has not taken long for the Ridley senior to put his losing ways behind him. Some off-season workouts and a few summer tournaments were apparently all he needed. By capturing the Ridley Tournament championship at 160 pounds on Wednesday, Rainey improved his record this season to 7-1 and has become one of the team's more dependable wrestlers.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The National Constitution Center will host the debut of a major traveling exhibition exploring the four-century sweep of the black American experience, from slavery to the cusp of the presidency, officials announced yesterday. America I AM: The African American Imprint was conceived by talk-show host and author Tavis Smiley, and organized by the Cincinnati Museum Center and Arts and Exhibition International, the private entity best known in Philadelphia for the blockbuster King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute last year.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
THINK Jane Austen and you think Pride and Prejudice , right? Not if you're director Kathryn MacMillan . While she is an Austen fan right down the line, "P&P" is, at best, a runner-up. For her, it's all about "Emma. " "It was the first thing I ever read and it's still my favorite," offered McMillan, who last night saw her version of "Emma" launch its six-week run at Center City's Lantern Theater with the first of five nights of previews. "I'm a big fan of all her writing, but 'Emma' is my favorite.
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NEWS
September 20, 2013
THINK Jane Austen and you think Pride and Prejudice , right? Not if you're director Kathryn MacMillan . While she is an Austen fan right down the line, "P&P" is, at best, a runner-up. For her, it's all about "Emma. " "It was the first thing I ever read and it's still my favorite," offered McMillan, who last night saw her version of "Emma" launch its six-week run at Center City's Lantern Theater with the first of five nights of previews. "I'm a big fan of all her writing, but 'Emma' is my favorite.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The first chops, to the forehead, did not go through the bone and are perhaps evidence of hesitancy about the task. The next set, after the body was rolled over, was more effective. One cut split the skull all the way to the base. "The person is truly figuring it out as they go," said Douglas Owsley, a physical anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution. In the meantime, someone - perhaps with more experience - was working on a leg. The tibia bone is broken with a single blow, as one might do in butchering a cow. That's one possible version of an event that took place sometime during the winter of 1609-10 in Jamestown.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The National Constitution Center will host the debut of a major traveling exhibition exploring the four-century sweep of the black American experience, from slavery to the cusp of the presidency, officials announced yesterday. America I AM: The African American Imprint was conceived by talk-show host and author Tavis Smiley, and organized by the Cincinnati Museum Center and Arts and Exhibition International, the private entity best known in Philadelphia for the blockbuster King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute last year.
NEWS
August 23, 2007 | Seymour I. Toll
Seymour I. Toll is a Philadelphia lawyer This is the 400th anniversary of two pioneering efforts to establish English colonies in America: Jamestown in Virginia and Popham Colony (Fort St. George) at the mouth of the Kennebec River on Maine's mid-coast. Although nearly abandoned in 1610, Jamestown survived to become the first successful English colony in America. Its culminating celebration in May included Queen Elizabeth II and President and Laura Bush. Maine's village of Popham in the town of Phippsburg (2000 census of 2,106 people)
NEWS
May 11, 2007 | By Steve Goldstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The "Eureka!" moment, as Bill Kelso recalls it, occurred in June 1994, when he discovered post holes forming an outline of the long-lost fort built by the Jamestown settlers. What he really found, though he didn't realize it then, was the key to understanding the American idea, unraveling a mystery that had been buried for nearly four centuries and changing everything for true believers in the Jamestown saga. Through the three-sided, palisaded structure and the nearly one million artifacts unearthed at the site, a story could be told of 104 immigrants determined to survive and succeed - a counterargument to scholars who portrayed a colony of indolent Englishmen, decimated by disease and famine, reduced to extorting food from the Indians and eating rats and, eventually, one another.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the opening moments of The New World an ominous thunderclap silences the birdsong, signaling the arrival of English colonists in Powhatan country (now Virginia) in 1607. Can the native Powhatans, who tread lightly on the bountiful land, coexist with the English, who deforest acres to build Jamestown colony? Terrence Malick's ravishing film, a meditation on America's foundation myth, centers on the encounter between Powhatan princess Pocahontas (Q'orianka Kilcher) and English adventurer John Smith (Colin Farrell)
SPORTS
October 13, 2002 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Hatboro-Horsham girls' team travels five miles just to practice on William Tennent's hilly cross-country course, and Jamestown of Williamsburg, Va., drives more than five hours one way to race at the William Tennent Invitational. Now in its 47th year, the meet is the longest continuously held cross-country invitational in Pennsylvania, according to meet director Ted Abel. It offers something for everybody, with varsity, junior varsity and novice races. This year, it also provided an athletic outlet for two teams on alert due to the sniper attacks in the Washington area.
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Eileen Ogintz, FOR THE INQUIRER
The kids looked dubious. Six soldiers shared that flimsy tent smaller than a pup tent? They didn't have sleeping bags either. Revolutionary War soldiers were assigned just one big blanket per tent: They'd cut it so each man got a piece, explained Bill Blair, chief interpreter for the Yorktown Victory Center museum as he stood in the "military encampment. " He invited the kids to lie down on top of the straw, as the soldiers did, sleeping in shifts. Most barely out of their teens, he explained, the soldiers ate watery stew, hard biscuits and whatever else they could find, getting sick often, with only herbal remedies to relieve their symptoms.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here are some of the writings and quotes cited by those who have questioned Patrick J. Buchanan's views on blacks, Jews, immigrants and women: "I think God made all people good, but if we had to take a million immigrants in, say Zulus, next year, or Englishmen, and put them in Virginia, what group would be easier to assimilate and would cause less problems for the people of Virginia?" From ABC News' This Week With David Brinkley, 1991. Women "are simply not endowed by nature with the same measures of single-minded ambition and the will to succeed in the fiercely competitive world of Western capitalism.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quick as the judge got the word out, Janey Rose's daddy erupted from the back row and stormed out of the only courtroom in town. Though Wallace Bobo Jr. was sitting up front with his lawyer, he could not have missed the abrupt exit. And when Bobo left the courtroom himself awhile later - undoubtedly relieved that one charge against him had just been dismissed - he showed no surprise at what he found outside. Sure enough, there stood John "Junior" Rose - feet planted on the cracked tile floor, hands plunged into the pockets of his signature khaki pants - when Bobo lumbered toward him down the wide flight of marble stairs.
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