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Jamie Wyeth

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NEWS
June 29, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jimmy Lynch, 63, formerly of Chadds Ford, "an appealing vagabond," artist and artist's model who was the subject of several important paintings by Andrew Wyeth and his son, Jamie, died of hypertension and heart arrhythmia June 4 at his home in Lewisburg, W.Va. Mr. Lynch grew up in Chadds Ford, two doors down from the Wyeths. Jamie Wyeth, just two years older, became a buddy. "I taught him to drive and he showed me what New York was," Mr. Lynch told a reporter in 1988. When galleries assigned a limousine to Jamie Wyeth for exhibit openings, "I'd sit in the back, play the guitar, and we'd think we were the Beatles or something.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Artist Jimmy Lynch once posed nude for Andrew Wyeth. For another painting, Draft Age, by Jamie Wyeth, he wore his signature leather jacket and a pair of 1960s-style wraparound sunglasses. In the end, the Andrew Wyeth painting, completed in 1990 and titled Man and the Moon, captured what Lynch thinks of today as his former "dark" self. Now, Lynch, 54, is no longer prone to the long and moody meditations that once found him sitting on his porch swing for days, pondering a career move to California.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Jamie Wyeth, like his late father, Andrew, was destined from childhood to become an artist. Also like Andrew, who died in January 2009, he was a precocious talent. The immediate evidence for that is the earliest work in Jamie's exhibition at the Brandywine River Museum, "Farm Work," accomplished watercolors such as Kennedy's Butter and Eggs, Mr. Borneman's Barn , and Stanchion Stall, all painted between the ages of 13 and 14. Jamie and his father ran on parallel tracks for a half century, but the son was always an independent spirit, especially in later years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Best known for a portrait of a pig, artist Jamie Wyeth says he has long had an affinity for animals. He has solicited roadkill from friends to feed a baby vulture, for instance. A trip to the White House was highlighted by a bout with a feisty presidential pooch. And when a neighbor's cow died, Wyeth was there in a flash to paint the burning of its carcass. Such brushes with animals resonate with a quirkiness that is comfortably consistent with his unconventional upbringing in Chadds Ford.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
Even though ours is an era characterized by a mix of styles and attitudes, the paintings in the "Jamie Wyeth - Seven Deadly Sins" show at Brandywine are remarkable hybrids. Such feverish portrayals of the daily life of seagulls seen close up in the wild off Monhegan Island, and the insistent painterly surface of these works, exemplify the current shift toward environmental tendencies in today's art. Clearly the work of a confirmed animal lover, the project features a mural-sized piece, several bird studies and a centerpiece: seven paintings of scavenger gulls portrayed as emblems of the human sins of avarice, anger, envy, gluttony, lust, pride, and sloth.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
Jamie Wyeth looks over spacing details for paintings to be included in "N.C. Wyeth and His Grandson: A Legacy. " The exhibit at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford opens tomorrow.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the dining room of their 18th-century Chadds Ford farmhouse, a Jamie Wyeth painting depicts a pastoral scene but a slightly chaotic one - his wife, Phyllis, in the midst of their farm animals. "Just the menagerie Phyllis has created around this place - the peacock, the emus, the black cat. A fox carrying on with the chickens," Jamie Wyeth said the other day, standing in front of the painting, titled Pointlookout Farmlife. Amid the swans and low-flying geese in the bottom right corner, kicking at some of those chickens with his hind legs, is a yearling.
SPORTS
May 2, 2012 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer
JAMIE WYETH left school in sixth grade, so, in his formative years, he interacted far more with animals than people. "I spent a lot of time alone; I left school to be tutored," the 65-year-old artist said last week. "So most of my companions were animals. It's as simple as that. I knew more animals than I did people. " He was talking about his life on the porch outside the throwback home he shares with his wife Phyllis at the glorious Point Lookout in Chadds Ford, the land spreading out below almost as far as the eye can see, the rolling Brandywine Creek and a railroad track sharing the foreground, a perfect frame for the deer lounging near the faraway tree line.
NEWS
October 15, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles F. Ellis, 82, formerly of Narberth, an art teacher and illustrator, died of heart failure Oct. 1 at his daughter Kathy Mannering's home in North Richland Hills, Texas. In 1971 Mr. Ellis was hired to teach illustration at the newly opened Art Institute of Philadelphia. He remained at the school for 22 years, teaching promising pupils such as poster artist Richard Amsel and painter Jamie Wyeth, who became a friend. Mr. Ellis also worked as a commercial artist for local advertising agencies; did illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post, Jack and Jill magazine, The Inquirer's Sunday magazine and other publications; and painted portraits for wealthy clients.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
How do different generations of Americans view the patriots and pirates of their day? That topic - and all its subtle shades of meaning - is broadly addressed in "One Nation: Patriots and Pirates Portrayed by N.C. Wyeth and James Wyeth," which opened recently at the Brandywine River Museum. While the exhibit offers a balanced showing of work by the patriarch of one of America's most celebrated artistic families and his grandson, it also manages to convey an entire country's evolving views, from the early 20th century to the present.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It all seems normal and matter-of-fact to Jamie Wyeth. He enters his grandfather's old studio, a National Historic Landmark owned and operated by the Brandywine River Museum, and there is the familiar birch bark canoe suspended from the ceiling, high in the barnlike space. There is the stuffed river otter, as fierce as ever; there, the model schooner; there, the carved bull's head, the horse head, the old camera, calipers, brushes, palette. And on an easel, left exactly as it was when N.C. Wyeth died in 1945, is an unfinished portrait of George Washington on horseback.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
A contemporary master painter and one of the greatest painters of all time, jewelry made in accordance with an ancient tradition and jewelry made millennia ago by a people nearly forgotten, the records of life set in stone-these are just some of what is featured in this season's selection of books designed for both reading and display. They're all worth their price tags. Jamie Wyeth by Elliot Bostwick Davis and David Houston (MFA Publications, $50). It's time Jamie Wyeth's work was looked at on its own terms, not in terms of family resemblances.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
That an expansive exhibition of work by painter Charles Burchfield is about to open at a Philadelphia-area museum is not an everyday event. Burchfield, who died in 1967, may not be well known here - he lived in Ohio and upstate New York - but he is considered one of the finest watercolorists ever to ply the trade in North America. "Breathtaking," wrote critic Christopher Knight of a 2009 Burchfield exhibition in Los Angeles. For Philadelphia, the exhibition is certainly welcome because it is unusual.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Born 64 years apart in different centuries, Jamie Wyeth and Rockwell Kent are distinctly different artists. Yet they share a deep familiarity with and affection for a small island called Monhegan, 12 miles off the coast of mid-Maine. It's not just that Wyeth and Kent painted on isolated, picturesque Monhegan; scores of American artists have done that, beginning in the mid-19th century. Living there at different times for extended periods, they became intimate with the granite-ribbed, seagirt community to a degree that eludes casual or seasonal visitors.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
ELMONT, N.Y. - It wasn't much of a hole for Union Rags to navigate, little more than a slip of light between the rail and Paynter, a speed horse that was threatening to steal away with the Belmont Stakes on Saturday evening. On another day, in another race, with luck that didn't hold quite as well, there wouldn't have been enough room for jockey John Velazquez to urge Union Rags from the shadow of his previous two races and into the winner's circle at last. Union Rags has experienced those days in what had been a disappointing racing season, but this time he got through, and this time, there's no longer a reason to question whether it was more than just bad racing fortune that held him back before.
SPORTS
May 7, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - From a sixth-floor balcony above the finish line at Churchill Downs, Chadds Ford's Phyllis Wyeth strained to find her horse through her binoculars as the field of the 138th Kentucky Derby passed by the first time. Wyeth's view was partially obstructed, and maybe that was for the best. She asked her husband, where is he? "Way back there," Jamie Wyeth said when he finally spotted Union Rags. " Way back there. " His odds of winning had evaporated before Union Rags even got running.
SPORTS
May 2, 2012 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer
JAMIE WYETH left school in sixth grade, so, in his formative years, he interacted far more with animals than people. "I spent a lot of time alone; I left school to be tutored," the 65-year-old artist said last week. "So most of my companions were animals. It's as simple as that. I knew more animals than I did people. " He was talking about his life on the porch outside the throwback home he shares with his wife Phyllis at the glorious Point Lookout in Chadds Ford, the land spreading out below almost as far as the eye can see, the rolling Brandywine Creek and a railroad track sharing the foreground, a perfect frame for the deer lounging near the faraway tree line.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the dining room of their 18th-century Chadds Ford farmhouse, a Jamie Wyeth painting depicts a pastoral scene but a slightly chaotic one - his wife, Phyllis, in the midst of their farm animals. "Just the menagerie Phyllis has created around this place - the peacock, the emus, the black cat. A fox carrying on with the chickens," Jamie Wyeth said the other day, standing in front of the painting, titled Pointlookout Farmlife. Amid the swans and low-flying geese in the bottom right corner, kicking at some of those chickens with his hind legs, is a yearling.
NEWS
December 13, 2011
Because of a production error, part of a paragraph in a story Sunday about A&P supermarkets was not published. The paragraph should have read: "Stores were closed, leases torn up, and vendor contracts renegotiated. But with the revised union contracts, the cost-cutting is now over, and the once-Wall Street-traded corporation may emerge as a privately owned business as early as February. " A story Sunday about the rerelease of Jewish music from the postwar era erroneously described the nightclub owner and singer Avram Grobard.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and a celebrated American artist came together Sunday in Chadds Ford in the name of a beloved dog - and for families who will outlive their pets. Jamie Wyeth never met the hound named Sammy, but when writer Barbara Walsh placed a blind call to him - she was expecting to reach an assistant - Wyeth answered, then listened as she talked about a children's book she had written to help families cope with loss after a pet dies. Wyeth, the third generation of the Brandywine-area dynasty of artists and an animal lover whose notable works include a finely detailed painting of a pig, was interested.
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