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Jane Eyre

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NEWS
March 4, 2012
By Margot Livesey HarperCollins. 464 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Maribel Molyneaux In The Flight of Gemma Hardy , Margot Livesey recasts Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre as a riveting story of self-actualization for contemporary readers. Livesey's narrative, set in post-World War II Scotland, replaces carriages and candlelight with automobiles and electric lights, but modern comforts do not diminish a quest that, like Jane Eyre's, takes Gemma Hardy on a sometimes harrowing journey to uncover the secrets of her own identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You've got to admire the perseverance behind Jane Eyre, the musicalization of the Charlotte Bronte novel that opened on Sunday at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. It has been a decade, more or less, since a pop songwriter named Paul Gordon conceived of the show and, with no collaborator in sight, began to write music and lyrics. It has been more than six years since John Caird, director of Les Miserables and Nicholas Nickleby, signed on as book writer and stager, and a full four years since the musical opened in Toronto for a run intended to lead straight to Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Jane Eyre" is the lumbering Bronte-saurus of cinema, still un-extinct after 18 adaptations. That's not counting a couple of TV miniseries (the latest an '06 BBC job) that pulled the Charlotte Bronte story out of gothballs. And it's certainly not counting SCTV send-up "Jane Eyrehead," in which Andrea Martin's Jane is hilariously slow to wake up to strange noises coming from the upstairs room of her wealthy suitor/master. The SCTV interpretation speaks to the modern woman - these days, girls, you have a right to know what's in your boyfriend's attic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Toward the end of Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte penned a line that explains why her novel will always present monumental problems for filmmakers. Long after turning down her ardent suitor, St. John Rivers, Jane observes that her words of rejection were never mentioned in any later meeting but "were always written on the air between him and me. " Franco Zeffirelli's latest version of Jane Eyre is a praiseworthy effort that nevertheless fails to...
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'Y ou can only breathe so much in corsets," says Mia Wasikowska , who was required to wear such an apparatus, along with various bell-shaped skirts, flounced petticoats, and tight little bonnets, as she assayed the title role in the new and beautifully miserable Jane Eyre . "It restricts your voice and your breath, and it's really symbolic of the repression of the day," she observes. "That's very much what that time represented for women - physical repression that becomes mental.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1999 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So you're going to the movies and the choice is Enemy of the State or Elizabeth. You take one look at him and know there's no choice at all. He's not going to watch men in tights. You're going to watch men blow things up. It doesn't matter if you promise severed heads, bared breasts and rivers of gore - all of which Elizabeth handily delivers - he won't go. Suggest Shakespeare in Love and it's worse still. Now, you've mentioned two things he has no interest in seeing.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Jane Eyre" offers valuable dating tips to women seeking to marry rich men. The most important rule: Never agree to marry a guy - doesn't matter how big his mansion is - without first getting a straight answer about the screaming noises coming from the attic. Jane Eyre (Charlotte Gainsbourg) is a smart, tough gal - reared and educated in a spartan orphanage. This has given her a delicate appreciation of music and literature, and a strong backbone. She is ideal for the position of governess at the country estate of a widower named Mr. Rochester (William Hurt)
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The teacher had heard about the books. Thousands and thousands of them, from two dozen city schools shuttered two years ago. Perfectly usable. All sitting boxed up and unused in the basement of the Philadelphia School District's headquarters. Like so many city teachers, she uses fund-raising websites to get the books she needs for her students. Like so many city teachers, she has students who can't bring home their torn-up textbooks because there aren't enough to go around.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
As Jane Eyre in Cary Joji Fukunaga's moody adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë novel, Mia Wasikowska progresses from a womanchild scared of her own shadow to one who, after a long eclipse, comes into the light. Both Wasikowska (recently the title character in Alice in Wonderland and The Kids Are All Right ) and Michael Fassbender ( Inglourious Basterds ) as Rochester, Jane's moody and magnetic employer, strike all the right notes. If you don't count I Walked With a Zombie , this is the 27th screen adaptation of Brontë's classic, the mother of all Gothic romances.
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NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The teacher had heard about the books. Thousands and thousands of them, from two dozen city schools shuttered two years ago. Perfectly usable. All sitting boxed up and unused in the basement of the Philadelphia School District's headquarters. Like so many city teachers, she uses fund-raising websites to get the books she needs for her students. Like so many city teachers, she has students who can't bring home their torn-up textbooks because there aren't enough to go around.
NEWS
March 4, 2012
By Margot Livesey HarperCollins. 464 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by Maribel Molyneaux In The Flight of Gemma Hardy , Margot Livesey recasts Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre as a riveting story of self-actualization for contemporary readers. Livesey's narrative, set in post-World War II Scotland, replaces carriages and candlelight with automobiles and electric lights, but modern comforts do not diminish a quest that, like Jane Eyre's, takes Gemma Hardy on a sometimes harrowing journey to uncover the secrets of her own identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
IN "RESTLESS," a troubled loner crashes funerals in Edwardian mourning garb set off by a watch fob, an indie-rocker haircut and Converse sneakers. He is, in other words, instantly and completely loathsome, and though he is regularly denounced as a childish and selfish, I felt I needed more denunciation. This despite that Gus Van Sant's "Restless" gives you ample reason to feel sorry for the guy (Henry Hopper), whose sobby backstory gives us an understanding of his self-pity and memorials obsession.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Jane Eyre" is the lumbering Bronte-saurus of cinema, still un-extinct after 18 adaptations. That's not counting a couple of TV miniseries (the latest an '06 BBC job) that pulled the Charlotte Bronte story out of gothballs. And it's certainly not counting SCTV send-up "Jane Eyrehead," in which Andrea Martin's Jane is hilariously slow to wake up to strange noises coming from the upstairs room of her wealthy suitor/master. The SCTV interpretation speaks to the modern woman - these days, girls, you have a right to know what's in your boyfriend's attic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
As Jane Eyre in Cary Joji Fukunaga's moody adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë novel, Mia Wasikowska progresses from a womanchild scared of her own shadow to one who, after a long eclipse, comes into the light. Both Wasikowska (recently the title character in Alice in Wonderland and The Kids Are All Right ) and Michael Fassbender ( Inglourious Basterds ) as Rochester, Jane's moody and magnetic employer, strike all the right notes. If you don't count I Walked With a Zombie , this is the 27th screen adaptation of Brontë's classic, the mother of all Gothic romances.
NEWS
March 20, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'Y ou can only breathe so much in corsets," says Mia Wasikowska , who was required to wear such an apparatus, along with various bell-shaped skirts, flounced petticoats, and tight little bonnets, as she assayed the title role in the new and beautifully miserable Jane Eyre . "It restricts your voice and your breath, and it's really symbolic of the repression of the day," she observes. "That's very much what that time represented for women - physical repression that becomes mental.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her son and only child starting college, Jane Eyre was looking - as so many do - for ways to enliven her evenings and fill the empty nest. In a community night-school catalog, two courses caught her interest: tai chi and fencing. An artist and athlete, Eyre was seeking to engage both mind and body. In her mid-40s, she also was itching for a way to express a newfound sense of self-confidence. Eyre signed up for fencing and within just a few sessions knew she had found her passion.
NEWS
December 21, 2005 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
The education of Soo and Jane Kim, like that of Henry Adams, bristled with moments of triumph and reversal. At her father's request, Soo read Jane Eyre one high school summer at a pace of 20 pages a day, highlighting every word she didn't understand, looking up its definition, and writing it out in a separate notebook. She learned a slew of them - 500 new words by book's end. Jane, like Soo, earned a candy bar as a child for each new library book she read. She too got 15-minute ping-pong and badminton breaks after intense parent-urged weekend study sessions for the SAT. Rewards also included mall trips, movies and Pizza Hut. But when Jane's grades slipped one year during high school, her parents scaled back their work hours, read her textbooks in order to help her, and devised a plan of attack that included extra study of math and science on top of regular homework.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You've got to admire the perseverance behind Jane Eyre, the musicalization of the Charlotte Bronte novel that opened on Sunday at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. It has been a decade, more or less, since a pop songwriter named Paul Gordon conceived of the show and, with no collaborator in sight, began to write music and lyrics. It has been more than six years since John Caird, director of Les Miserables and Nicholas Nickleby, signed on as book writer and stager, and a full four years since the musical opened in Toronto for a run intended to lead straight to Broadway.
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